Intransitive verbs do not take a direct object or complement.

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3answers
2k views

Intransitive verbs with preposition in passive sentences

The words listen, shout, etc. are intransitive verbs, but why are they used in passive sentences with preposition to, at, etc.? e.g: she was never listened to. I don’t like to be shouted at. ...
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2answers
2k views

What's the difference between using the verb “change” transitively and intransitively?

I am confused about using transitive and intransitive verbs for making passive sentences. Especially when that verb can be both (like the verb change).
7
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2answers
3k views

What is the difference between “raise” and “rise”?

What is the difference between raise and rise? When and how should I use each one?
9
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1answer
151 views

Do reflexive verbs often evolve into intransitive usage?

With the relatively recent proliferation in the number and variety of genders that our contemporaries willingly proclaim themselves to be or belong to, a new intransitive sense of the verb identify, ...
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3answers
50k views

“Email me” and “mail to me”

Why is it correct to say "email me", whereas with the word mail we say/write "mail to me"?
2
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1answer
76 views

Can “expirable” be a word?

[Code Naming Issue] Please anyone leave me a comment. Anything will be great for me now. I am working on what to name a feature which works as part of a module that generates URLs that expire when ...
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1answer
73 views

Is there an intransitive verb with a passive meaning in English?

Is there an intransitive verb with a passive meaning in English? More than one example is also welcome.