Intransitive verbs do not take a direct object or complement.

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What's the difference between using the verb “change” transitively and intransitively?

I am confused about using transitive and intransitive verbs for making passive sentences. Especially when that verb can be both (like the verb change).
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2answers
2k views

What is the difference between “raise” and “rise”?

What is the difference between raise and rise? When and how should I use each one?
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3answers
1k views

Intransitive verbs with preposition in passive sentences

The words listen, shout, etc. are intransitive verbs, but why are they used in passive sentences with preposition to, at, etc.? e.g: she was never listened to. I don’t like to be shouted at. ...
4
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4answers
554 views

Why is “look” transitive in “look you in the eye”?

Why is look used as a transitive verb in the phrase look you in the eye? I checked look in Cambridge Dictionaries and found only an intransitive look, not a transitive one.
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2answers
416 views

Does one remonstrate another or does one remonstrate with another?

If I am protesting forcefully the actions of another, let’s call him Joe, would it be better to say: I remonstrated Joe over his choice of words in that argument. or would I say: I ...
3
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3answers
37k views

“Email me” and “mail to me”

Why is it correct to say "email me", whereas with the word mail we say/write "mail to me"?
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3answers
730 views

If the conditions warrant

! Source 'Central bank securities purchases have provided meaningful support to the economic recovery,' he said adding later that, 'we should not rule out the further use of such policies if ...
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1answer
63 views

Is there an intransitive verb with a passive meaning in English?

Is there an intransitive verb with a passive meaning in English? More than one example is also welcome.