3
votes
4answers
105 views

Why is “look” transitive in “look you in the eye”?

Why is look used as a transitive verb in the phrase look you in the eye? I checked look in Cambridge Dictionaries and found only an intransitive look, not a transitive one.
-1
votes
1answer
136 views

Is “reduce” transitive or intransitive?

Is the verb reduce used incorrectly in the sentence below? Would you personally choose to replace reduce with an alternative such as drop or fall? The birth rate has reduced over the past 10 ...
1
vote
0answers
36 views

how to use the verb 'face' [duplicate]

This is one of the questions from SAT. Preserving rare and valuable books is one of the challenges facing the Librarian of Congress. My question is if the sentence above has no error. Isn't the ...
4
votes
3answers
216 views

“The same X” and intransitive verbs

As I have had explained to me at great length, wonder is intransitive. That's fine, but it can seem to take an object: Jim: Yesterday I wondered what that mark on the wall was made by Dave: I ...
1
vote
2answers
753 views

What's the difference between using the verb “change” transitively and intransitively?

I am confused about using transitive and intransitive verbs for making passive sentences. Especially when that verb can be both (like the verb change).
2
votes
1answer
82 views

“trust the fact” vs. “trust to the fact”?

I think "trust the fact" is more natural than "trust to the fact", but the search result shows that the latter is more popular. What's the difference between them? Thanks. Yet another derived ...
1
vote
2answers
212 views

Is it “Seeking a bigger challenge” or “Seeking for a bigger challenge”?

Sometimes in a job application form, it asks you for the reason of leaving the previous company, and if the reason is to look for a bigger challenge, would it be Seeking a bigger challenge Seeking ...
1
vote
0answers
275 views

transitive vs intransitive verb [closed]

I'm not expert in English grammar, but I need to understand the difference between a transitive verb and an intransitive verb. Can someone explain this to me?
0
votes
1answer
303 views

Is the verb 'let' transitive or intransitive?

Is the verb 'let', with the meaning 'to cause to', transitive or intransitive? E.g.: Do you want to go out for a pizza? Please let know. Is this allowed or is it misuse?
5
votes
3answers
4k views

“Pay rise” vs “pay raise”

Which sentence below is correct? Ben received a pay rise. Ben received a pay raise.
2
votes
3answers
22k views

“Email me” and “mail to me”

Why is it correct to say "email me", whereas with the word mail we say/write "mail to me"?
7
votes
2answers
1k views

What is the difference between “raise” and “rise”?

What is the difference between raise and rise? When and how should I use each one?