Intransitive verbs do not take a direct object or complement.

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Passive version of “process” (verb)

The context is programming, if you're wondering. It's pretty straightforward to tell a Processor to Process something, but I wonder what you would tell the Processee. Is there some verb that means ...
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1answer
29 views

Transitive / intransitive verbs

I’d appreciate a second opinion on an exercise I’m doing, that is, to determine whether the main verbs of sentences are transitive or intransitive. The sentence is as follows: The teacher decided ...
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1answer
51 views

“Hover a link” vs “hover over a link” [closed]

Which is correct: "hover a link" or "hover over a link"? (context: hovering a mouse over a computer hyperlink) I'd especially appreciate a reference (like a dictionary citation) so that I learn how ...
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1answer
20 views

The construct: [subject] “approximates” [something] to [something else]

Cambridge provides this example of "approximate" as a verb: to come near in ​quality, ​amount, ​value, or ​character: The ​painting only approximated the ​mountain ​landscape. Similarly, ...
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1answer
78 views

How does your orange peel?

Increasingly over the last few years, UK supermarkets and grocers have offered us things called 'Easy Peelers' (also easy-peelers, and in one case I've seen, easypeelers). It's a generic term that ...
2
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2answers
50 views

In “laugh your head off”, Is “laugh” an intransitive verb?

I am a little confused with a transitive and intransitive verb form. Can someone help me with this, please?
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1answer
146 views

What is the meaning of the word “matches”? [closed]

I am studying regular expressions. A regular expression is a pattern that you can match in a text. In books, I often read things like the period . matches any single character. What is the ...
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2answers
95 views

Is “ran after” a phrasal verb?

I'm having some difficulty parsing this sentence: "The old beggar ran after the rich man." Is the verb "ran" (intransitive) with no object, or is it "ran after" (transitive) with the object ...
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1answer
71 views

Is there an intransitive verb with a passive meaning in English?

Is there an intransitive verb with a passive meaning in English? More than one example is also welcome.
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1answer
139 views

Do reflexive verbs often evolve into intransitive usage?

With the relatively recent proliferation in the number and variety of genders that our contemporaries willingly proclaim themselves to be or belong to, a new intransitive sense of the verb identify, ...
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3answers
168 views

Defining intransitive verbs

As intransitive verbs, I mean not phrasal verbs used transitively and transitive verbs with to infinitive For example : I attempt to climb the tree Is it correct to surmise that intransitive ...
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1answer
168 views

“Informing” — Gerund instead of Verb+Object?

I think if we take informing as a noun in this sentence, it should be fine. What are your views on the grammaticality of the following sentence? He left me without informing.
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2answers
188 views

Intransitive use of the verb “reduce”

I know that the verb “reduce”, which is often followed by an object, can also be used intransitively, as dictionaries show very clearly. What I am unsure of, however, is whether “reduce” could ...
3
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2answers
444 views

Sit v. sit down

I seriously cannot find any good, thorough responses to this question, and I'm trying to help out a non-native friend. Sit down implies motion. I understand that because of the preposition "down". ...
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2answers
571 views

Should “listening” always be followed by the preposition “to”?

While we always add a preposition to with listen, as in listen to music, does that apply with listening as well? Is the following sentence correct? I am habitual of listening this from you ?
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0answers
725 views

Translates to vs translates as

The call it “Amba,” which literally translates as “tiger” in the local dialect. They call it “Amba,” which literally translates to “tiger” in the local dialect. I see “translates to” and ...
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8answers
6k views

Can a sentence have an indirect object without a direct object?

Everywhere I look online, people seem to say the same thing: "A sentence with an indirect object must have a direct object." Every case of confusion I've seen about this rule has only involved ...
2
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3answers
2k views

Intransitive verbs with preposition in passive sentences

The words listen, shout, etc. are intransitive verbs, but why are they used in passive sentences with preposition to, at, etc.? e.g: she was never listened to. I don’t like to be shouted at. ...
4
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4answers
902 views

Why is “look” transitive in “look you in the eye”?

Why is look used as a transitive verb in the phrase look you in the eye? I checked look in Cambridge Dictionaries and found only an intransitive look, not a transitive one.
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1answer
572 views

Is “reduce” transitive or intransitive?

Is the verb reduce used incorrectly in the sentence below? Would you personally choose to replace reduce with an alternative such as drop or fall? The birth rate has reduced over the past 10 ...
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2answers
2k views

“Want to relieve from” vs. “want relief from”

Want to relieve from academic pressure. Want relief from academic pressure. I think the former one is more proper but my teacher said the latter one is correct.
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2answers
3k views

Use of “manifest” as an active verb

Recently I completed an English creative writing exam in which I used the phrase files and papers manifest, as if by some unholy magic at the tray on his desk. My teacher stated that my use of ...
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1answer
219 views

“are created equal” - helping verb or linking verb?

In the following clause, that all men are created equal, is "are" serving as a linking verb (in which case you could say "the created (to be) equal men") or as a helping verb for main verb ...
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1answer
357 views

imperative and intransitive

I'm translating two poems into English and I have two questions -- hopefully someone will be able to help me with them... First, I needed to know whether I can simply use "See!" as a sentence ...
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0answers
36 views

how to use the verb 'face' [duplicate]

This is one of the questions from SAT. Preserving rare and valuable books is one of the challenges facing the Librarian of Congress. My question is if the sentence above has no error. Isn't the ...
4
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3answers
238 views

“The same X” and intransitive verbs

As I have had explained to me at great length, wonder is intransitive. That's fine, but it can seem to take an object: Jim: Yesterday I wondered what that mark on the wall was made by Dave: I ...
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1answer
6k views

Passive voice for sentences like “He is going somewhere”

I have this sentence that I trying to render into passive voice: Tom is going to school. According to the rules described in this document (“Passive voice with direct and indirect objects”), it ...
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2answers
1k views

What's the difference between using the verb “change” transitively and intransitively?

I am confused about using transitive and intransitive verbs for making passive sentences. Especially when that verb can be both (like the verb change).
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3answers
716 views

Can “process” be used as an intransitive verb?

I am currently spending some time creating a (partial) Liferay translation for the Greek language, and I came upon this original English message text: Your request processed successfully. Can ...
2
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1answer
127 views

“trust the fact” vs. “trust to the fact”?

I think "trust the fact" is more natural than "trust to the fact", but the search result shows that the latter is more popular. What's the difference between them? Thanks. Yet another derived ...
2
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4answers
4k views

Grammaticality of “I have already asked from him”

In response to a question, I have to answer. An example: A: Hello B, can I go? B: Ask C first. A: I have already asked from C. Is this grammatical?
5
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2answers
480 views

Does one remonstrate another or does one remonstrate with another?

If I am protesting forcefully the actions of another, let’s call him Joe, would it be better to say: I remonstrated Joe over his choice of words in that argument. or would I say: I ...
4
votes
3answers
832 views

Test for intransitivity of verbs?

Is it true that if any verb is immediately followed by a prepositional phrase, then it has to be an intransitive verb? As a counter example, I need a sentence which: (i) has only one verb, and ...
2
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2answers
2k views

Is it “Seeking a bigger challenge” or “Seeking for a bigger challenge”?

Sometimes in a job application form, it asks you for the reason of leaving the previous company, and if the reason is to look for a bigger challenge, would it be Seeking a bigger challenge Seeking ...
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3answers
847 views

If the conditions warrant

! Source 'Central bank securities purchases have provided meaningful support to the economic recovery,' he said adding later that, 'we should not rule out the further use of such policies if ...
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1answer
515 views

Is the verb 'let' transitive or intransitive?

Is the verb 'let', with the meaning 'to cause to', transitive or intransitive? E.g.: Do you want to go out for a pizza? Please let know. Is this allowed or is it misuse?
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3answers
12k views

“Pay rise” vs “pay raise”

Which sentence below is correct? Ben received a pay rise. Ben received a pay raise.
3
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3answers
44k views

“Email me” and “mail to me”

Why is it correct to say "email me", whereas with the word mail we say/write "mail to me"?
7
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2answers
2k views

What is the difference between “raise” and “rise”?

What is the difference between raise and rise? When and how should I use each one?