Intransitive verbs do not take a direct object or complement.

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Translates to vs translates as

The call it “Amba,” which literally translates as “tiger” in the local dialect. They call it “Amba,” which literally translates to “tiger” in the local dialect. I see “translates to” and ...
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5answers
127 views

Can a sentence have an indirect object without a direct object?

Everywhere I look online, people seem to say the same thing: "A sentence with an indirect object must have a direct object." Every case of confusion I've seen about this rule has only involved ...
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3answers
203 views

Intransitive verbs with preposition in passive sentences

The words listen, shout, etc. are intransitive verbs, but why are they used in passive sentences with preposition to, at, etc.? e.g: she was never listened to. I don’t like to be shouted at. ...
3
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4answers
150 views

Why is “look” transitive in “look you in the eye”?

Why is look used as a transitive verb in the phrase look you in the eye? I checked look in Cambridge Dictionaries and found only an intransitive look, not a transitive one.
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1answer
196 views

Is “reduce” transitive or intransitive?

Is the verb reduce used incorrectly in the sentence below? Would you personally choose to replace reduce with an alternative such as drop or fall? The birth rate has reduced over the past 10 ...
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2answers
138 views

“Want to relieve from” vs. “want relief from”

Want to relieve from academic pressure. Want relief from academic pressure. I think the former one is more proper but my teacher said the latter one is correct.
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3answers
643 views

Use of “manifest” as an active verb

Recently I completed an English creative writing exam in which I used the phrase files and papers manifest, as if by some unholy magic at the tray on his desk. My teacher stated that my use of ...
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1answer
127 views

“are created equal” - helping verb or linking verb?

In the following clause, that all men are created equal, is "are" serving as a linking verb (in which case you could say "the created (to be) equal men") or as a helping verb for main verb ...
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1answer
180 views

imperative and intransitive

I'm translating two poems into English and I have two questions -- hopefully someone will be able to help me with them... First, I needed to know whether I can simply use "See!" as a sentence ...
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0answers
36 views

how to use the verb 'face' [duplicate]

This is one of the questions from SAT. Preserving rare and valuable books is one of the challenges facing the Librarian of Congress. My question is if the sentence above has no error. Isn't the ...
4
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3answers
221 views

“The same X” and intransitive verbs

As I have had explained to me at great length, wonder is intransitive. That's fine, but it can seem to take an object: Jim: Yesterday I wondered what that mark on the wall was made by Dave: I ...
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1answer
2k views

Passive voice for sentences like “He is going somewhere”

I have this sentence that I trying to render into passive voice: Tom is going to school. According to the rules described in this document (“Passive voice with direct and indirect objects”), it ...
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2answers
855 views

What's the difference between using the verb “change” transitively and intransitively?

I am confused about using transitive and intransitive verbs for making passive sentences. Especially when that verb can be both (like the verb change).
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3answers
349 views

Can “process” be used as an intransitive verb?

I am currently spending some time creating a (partial) Liferay translation for the Greek language, and I came upon this original English message text: Your request processed successfully. Can ...
2
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1answer
90 views

“trust the fact” vs. “trust to the fact”?

I think "trust the fact" is more natural than "trust to the fact", but the search result shows that the latter is more popular. What's the difference between them? Thanks. Yet another derived ...
2
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4answers
2k views

Grammaticality of “I have already asked from him”

In response to a question, I have to answer. An example: A: Hello B, can I go? B: Ask C first. A: I have already asked from C. Is this grammatical?
5
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2answers
315 views

Does one remonstrate another or does one remonstrate with another?

If I am protesting forcefully the actions of another, let’s call him Joe, would it be better to say: I remonstrated Joe over his choice of words in that argument. or would I say: I ...
4
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3answers
527 views

Test for intransitivity of verbs?

Is it true that if any verb is immediately followed by a prepositional phrase, then it has to be an intransitive verb? As a counter example, I need a sentence which: (i) has only one verb, and ...
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1answer
111 views

Usage of “there” in English [closed]

E.g., in the sentence: There is no alternative. Wikipedia says: The word there is used as a pronoun in some sentences, playing the role of a dummy subject, normally of an intransitive verb. ...
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2answers
397 views

Is it “Seeking a bigger challenge” or “Seeking for a bigger challenge”?

Sometimes in a job application form, it asks you for the reason of leaving the previous company, and if the reason is to look for a bigger challenge, would it be Seeking a bigger challenge Seeking ...
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3answers
570 views

If the conditions warrant

! Source 'Central bank securities purchases have provided meaningful support to the economic recovery,' he said adding later that, 'we should not rule out the further use of such policies if ...
1
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0answers
280 views

transitive vs intransitive verb [closed]

I'm not expert in English grammar, but I need to understand the difference between a transitive verb and an intransitive verb. Can someone explain this to me?
0
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1answer
337 views

Is the verb 'let' transitive or intransitive?

Is the verb 'let', with the meaning 'to cause to', transitive or intransitive? E.g.: Do you want to go out for a pizza? Please let know. Is this allowed or is it misuse?
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3answers
5k views

“Pay rise” vs “pay raise”

Which sentence below is correct? Ben received a pay rise. Ben received a pay raise.
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3answers
25k views

“Email me” and “mail to me”

Why is it correct to say "email me", whereas with the word mail we say/write "mail to me"?
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2answers
1k views

What is the difference between “raise” and “rise”?

What is the difference between raise and rise? When and how should I use each one?