Interrogative is a term used in grammar to refer to features that form questions.

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“Which course are you enrolled in?” vs. “Under which course are you enrolled?”

If I want to ask someone about the course they are taking, what would be the more appropriate usage: Which course are you enrolled in? Under which course are you enrolled?
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Is the question “where is Elmo's legs?” correct usage? [closed]

Is Where is Elmo's legs? correct usage? And how about: Where's Elmo's legs? Is that more or less acceptable, and why?
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1answer
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Position of auxiliary verb [duplicate]

Can you tell me please, which variant is better: What do you think is the most serious problem in the world? or, What do you think the most serious problem in the world is?
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1answer
85 views

Is It Correct to Say ‘Need I Not’?

Need is utilised as a normal and also a modal verb (similar to ‘can’, ‘shall’...). e.g. I don’t need; I need not. Is it correct to say need I not or needn’t I for the interrogative form?
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“What have we here?” vs. “What do we have here?” [closed]

Could someone explain which structure is correct and if it's okay to say the other one? Oh, what have we here? Oh, what do we have here? Can we simply invert the subject and the verb to ...
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2answers
281 views

If and Whether - or not? Interrogative and Conditional words

It's clear to me that in some situations, "if" works but "whether" does not: 1a) If it rains, I shall take my umbrella. 1b) Call me if rain is predicted. Also some where only "whether or not" will ...
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What is the origin of auxiliary verbs?

When and why did we start using auxiliary verbs, particularly "do", to ask questions and make negatives?
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99 views

Is this sentence grammatically correct? “Isn't it only you who have that book?”

Instead of saying: "It's only you who have that book, isn't it?" can we say, "Isn't it only you who have that book?"
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621 views

“which day is Friday” vs. “what day is Friday”

Thanks to: "Which" vs. "what" — what's the difference and when should you use one or the other? I know that "what" can replace "which" in the examples below. But which ...
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How to categorize this phrase. Relative clause, Interrogative clause, Adverbial clause?

What is "Where to go" in the sentence "Where to go is the question." Is it a adverbial phrase or a relative clause? And what is "Why go" in the sentence "Why go when you can stay?" - is it a clause?
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“What singer do you dislike?” “What singer don't you like?” “Who among singers do you hate?” [closed]

What singer do you dislike? What singer don't you like? Who among singers do you hate? Are these grammatically correct? In sentences 1 and 2 is it okay to use "which" instead of ...
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3answers
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If we can say 'Where are you going to?', why don't we say 'Where do you live in?'?

In most cases 'where' seems to be substituting for a prepositional phrase. As in: - Where do you live? / I live in Brighton. Where does the train stop? / It stops at Reading and Bristol. So why is ...
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Asking questions without subject-verb inversion — a new trend?

I don't know what it is called but I have seen people using the sentence which is the answer of some question as question itself. For example: You are going to play tennis? (this isn't much ...
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4answers
491 views

Can I put the question word “where” at the end of a question? [closed]

I got this sentence from a Primary 5 student's worksheet. According to this passage, this creature can be found where? Some of the parents think that the sentence should be "..., where can ...
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1answer
88 views

“Does our process cause users to abandon tasks they WERE/ARE about to perform?”

I have written the following sentence as part of the conclusion to my thesis. This represents one of the future research questions, i.e., it is not part of my research questions, it is something that ...
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4answers
240 views

uncountable noun + and + uncountable noun [duplicate]

Which sounds better? There is water and butter in my fridge. There are water and butter in my fridge. I think it should be: is. But what if we said: How much flour and butter is needed to ...
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2answers
138 views

Whom or who in this case? Google thinks who [duplicate]

I was asking someone "whom were you horrible to?" And thought, is it who or whom? I believe it's whom but when I typed the phrase into Google search It felt differently.
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Use of “Could you tell what kind of”

What is the correct use of the verb in the following sentences: Could you tell me what kind of qualifications does a deputy coroner have? Could you tell me what kind of car he owns? What kind of ...
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107 views

What do you think?

I think of this place as my home. (OALD) Consulting the sentence above, can I make an interrogative as these?: [a] As what do you think of this place? [b] What do you think of this place as? Or ...
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1answer
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“What ever happened to” versus “Whatever happened to”?

I recently asked Whatever happened to (some noun from the past)? But then wondered if I should have preferred to split whatever into two words: What ever happened to (some noun from the ...
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1answer
111 views

The Usage Domains of “why” and “how”

This question was inspired by the this thread over at physics.se. What are the correct uses of "why" and "how" as interrogatives? Do questions that begin with "why" necessarily pursue answers which ...
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“Why are you asking?” versus “Why do you ask?”

Why are you asking Tom? He does not know the answer. Ask me instead! versus No, I have not seen for quite some time. Why do you ask? Is it correct? And if it is, why the difference? Is it ...
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2answers
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“What / who do think…” structure

Here's a list of examples I've seen: What do you think happened? Who do you think has killed him? Who do you think he killed? How does this structure what/who do you think... ...
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Sentence pattern in interrogative sentence

am class 8. My teacher was revising sentence pattern today, I got a thought of asking my friend a question that is: Frame a sentence with pattern of V + S + V + O He couldn't find an answer and ...
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3answers
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“This helps us how?” vs. “How does this help us?”

In the sci-fi movie Inception by Christopher Nolan, in the first level of dreaming, they kidnap Cilian Murphy and Tom Hardy tries to get some information from him, by impersonating Browning, his ...
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Must (Past Obligation Interrogative) “Must you have eaten all the food?” [closed]

Is the question "Must you have eaten all the food" correct when used in the past obligatory sense? The best examples I can find are quite ambiguous. "Must He have been less than perfectly kind to ...
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“Why the sun shines?”

I've seen questions framed in the following manner many a time: "Why the sun shines?" "Why hair grows?" While the most correct way to frame these kind of questions is obviously: "Why does ...
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fused relatives versus interrogatives

Would you differentiate which are relatives and which are interrogatives? (And I want to know the sub-category (sub-name) of each below, if they are.) “You can keep it,” said Harry, laughing at ...
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What’s the difference between “how” and “how so”? [closed]

Please tell me the difference between these two questions: how how so Do those two mean the same thing? If they do not, please explain with examples.
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3answers
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“What am I” vs. “who am I”

Yesterday I was going through my son's books and at one place it was written I have a long neck, I have spots on my body — what am I? I thought it should have been I have a long neck, ...
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631 views

Is “who did what” grammatically correct?

Sometimes I wish to know what each person in a group of people did, or where each person went, or which book goes where. Is it correct to say, Who went where? Who did what? Who told whom? ...
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Who vs whom in "Who is the right person to turn to? [duplicate]

Take the sentence: Who is the right person to turn to? I'm not sure whether who or whom should be used in this position.
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Why can I say,'Why do you like her so much?' but not, 'Why do you like her very much?'

Why can I say,'Why do you like her so much?' but not, 'Why do you like her very much?' My answer is: 'Why' is evaluative and forces you to make (or consider) a comparison. Very cannot be used in ...
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“Which browsers do support this?” or “Which browsers support this?” [duplicate]

What is the correct syntax: "Which browsers do support this?" "Which browsers support this?"
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What/How is the time?

The farmyard was deserted. Dieter had gone down the lane with Rupert and Nialla to the river, and by now they had probably already made camp. If I was lucky, I might be just in time for a cup ...
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Grammaticality of linking two questions like “how often” and “why” together

I would like to ask the postage department the questions like "how often the packages got lost in the mail" and "why the packages got lost in the mail". While it is absolutely correct in Russian to ...
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How would you phrase questions that require an “interrogative ordinal” which is absent in English? [duplicate]

Duplicate of: How should I phrase a question that must be answered with an ordinal number (e.g., the third prime)? How to phrase an asking sentence that must be answered with an ordinal number? ...
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“How far” vs “How long”

I am not clear how to use "How long" and "How far". Suppose I got in a taxi or cab to my hotel, how should I say to the driver if I want to know the distance to the hotel? Which of the following is ...
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How to punctuate a quoted rhetorical interrogative sentence that ends a declarative sentence?

Below is the sentence I am writing. I am not sure whether I should just end it with an interrogation mark within the quotes, with a period within the quotes, no in-quote punctuation except ...
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Question about interrogations in past tense

In regard to this answer, my question is similar but that answer is not clear. I want to know why we use base form of verb, e.g. 'go' to form the past tense instead of past form such as 'went'? ...
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Interrogative form of a sentence [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: How should I phrase a question that must be answered with an ordinal number (e.g., the third prime)? How to ask a question to get a cardinal number answer Neil ...
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1answer
426 views

Exclamation before or after the interrogation? Doesn't matter? [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: Is there a standard ordering for the question mark and the exclamation mark used together? Which is correct: Was That Folk!? Was That Folk?! Or both? I ...
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Long subjects in indirect questions

I know that to indirectly ask: What is your name? I should say something like: I don't know what your name is. But what if the subject of question is longer than "your name"? Something ...
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What is the plural of interrogative words (what, who, where, when, how, why, etc.)

If interrogative words are used as nouns, how are they pluralized? Example: This will answer your hows and whys. What is the correct form? whys (the same as most English words?) why's (following ...
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2answers
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Has there been an interrogative word to ask for a quantity or amount?

English uses how much/many to ask for an amount or a quantity. Has there been an interrogative word in Old, Middle, or Modern English to convey the meaning of how much/many (i.e., an equivalent to the ...
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“When” vs. “what time”

When are we meeting, dear, I am hungry? or What time are we meeting, dear, I am hungry? Please elaborate on the semantical differences.
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Why does “how” not follow the structure of the other interrogatives?

Most interrogatives start with wh- and come with the demonstrative pronomina: where - there what - that whence - thence But "how" is different. Is there a simple reason for this? (I posed a ...
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Is it considered rude language to omit interrogatives in speech?

At least, I think the proper word is interrogatives. But, for example, in proper sentence structure, you would see sentences such as, Are you still here, Alouicious? Is there a doctor in the ...
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Who, what, where, when, why, how. Why so many “Wh”s?

Journalists are taught to ask who, what, where, when, why, and how. If you answer all of these chances are you have the bones of a story. Why do all these words, with the exception of "how" start with ...
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Question on usage on 'Rating Yourself'

Assuming you are the interviewer and would you ask the candidate: How would you rate yourself on the scale from 1 to 10? What would you rate yourself on the scale of 1 to 10? Which ...