Interrogative is a term used in grammar to refer to features that form questions.

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“Are YOU coming to get me” / “Are you coming to GET me” Is there any grammatical or semantic difference?

Is there any grammatical or semantic difference between the phrases: "Are you coming to get me?"—used to imply the question of whether that particular person is coming to get whoever. And this ...
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3answers
144 views

Non-conditional IFs [closed]

So I've heard some (I don't know what to call) non-conditional Ifs, and I've been trying to figure it out how they work. It's not like the first time I get troubles with conditional sentences, I ...
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2answers
76 views

How to form an interrogative to ask a question about time [closed]

I have a bit of confusion regarding the use of interrogatives while asking questions about time in the past. How would we ask about time at which we did something in the past? How much time ago did ...
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1answer
93 views

Asking questions without “do” in them

In school, we learned that in interrogative statements to use do (e.g. Do you want to go there?). I'm wondering if there are any cases when do is not required. For example, I'm thinking if this is ...
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2answers
62 views

Whose sunshine do you belong to? [closed]

Are these sentences grammatically correct? They are translated from Thai song lyrics. Whose sunshine do you belong to? Who is your sunflower?
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1answer
90 views

How do I know where to place the stress?

In questions that start with interrogative pronouns such as: what, when, and why, should they be stressed? For example, is the word "time" stressed in the sentence? Is "What" stressed, too? What ...
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0answers
63 views

Difference between “where” and "what' when asking for a place to visit

What is the difference between where and what when asking for a place to visit as follows: (a) Where will we visit in Yilan? (b) What will we visit in Yilan? Is there any difference in ...
2
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1answer
42 views

“Isn't that the place WHICH kids under 12 can't enter?” - Is it correct to use 'that/which' when it refers to a place?

I was teaching an ESL class and came accross this sentence which confused me a lot: The Queen Alice is the place that I go to the most" "Isn't that the place which kids under 12 can't enter?" ...
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3answers
37 views

Should a different word be used when “what” is used as an object?

While speaking with a co-worker today, I asked "Who should I speak with?" I quickly corrected myself saying "With whom should I speak?" I followed with "What should I look at?" To ...
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2answers
271 views

“What do you do on Sundays?” vs “What are you doing on Sunday?”

"What do you do on Sundays?" vs "What are you doing on Sunday?" In the first one, the question asks what I do in general on the 7th day of the week. While in the second one, I am asked what my plans ...
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2answers
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use of interrogatives in the clause

I have a point of confusion regarding the use of interrogatives in English, as I am not a native speaker of English. I want you to inquire from your teacher of English that are the classes of ...
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3answers
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What should be the Interogative form of this sentence [closed]

She should have left him. According to me, the interrogative form would be - "Shouldn't she have left him?" What should be the interrogative form, suggest.
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0answers
34 views

Is this sentence considered an interrogative sentence?

Is this still considered an interrogative sentence, even though the question is within quotation marks? She said, "Could you clean up the kitchen?"
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2answers
137 views

What the matter is vs. what is the matter used in the affirmative [duplicate]

I want to know what the matter is with her. I want to know what's the matter with her. I want to know what's her problem. Is "I want to know what's the matter with her" and 'what's the matter' ...
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9answers
6k views

Why is 'Where's it' Grammatically incorrect? [duplicate]

I want to explain to the Spanish developers of a website why this text label sounds wrong: If your column isn't country data, where's it? IMHO, you have to say "Where is it?" - but I don't know ...
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1answer
99 views

In which etymology

Why do we say "In which" in many formal essays and documents? I never understood this. The definition for which on Merriam Webster is "being what one or ones out of a group". Why is it that we have ...
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2answers
76 views

how to end a non-interrogative sentence with a question? Is question mark necessary?

Given the fact that the court’s decree is binding and peremptory (paragraph 1 of article 94 of the charter and articles 59 and 60 of the court’s constitution) and the fact that temporary agreement ...
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2answers
278 views

Is it grammatically wrong to say, “I don't know where she is traveling”?

This is a question related to interrogative (or indirect question) clause. I thought that it is incorrect to have a preposition stranded at the end of the sentence like: I know where she lives in. ...
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3answers
391 views

“Whom would you offer the ride?”

I was wondering if this question is accepted grammatically: "Whom would you offer the ride?" Some people say that the preposition 'to' should be added in this sentence: "To whom would ...
2
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1answer
687 views

Is this grammatical? “You are who I love.”

I've just got wondering if this sentence is grammatically correct: You are who I love. This is what I am thinking: Let's focus on the who clause, then you can find that the missing element ...
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1answer
150 views

“Which course are you enrolled in?” vs. “Under which course are you enrolled?”

If I want to ask someone about the course they are taking, what would be the more appropriate usage: Which course are you enrolled in? Under which course are you enrolled?
2
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1answer
92 views

Is the question “where is Elmo's legs?” correct usage? [closed]

Is Where is Elmo's legs? correct usage? And how about: Where's Elmo's legs? Is that more or less acceptable, and why?
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1answer
168 views

Position of auxiliary verb [duplicate]

Can you tell me please, which variant is better: What do you think is the most serious problem in the world? or, What do you think the most serious problem in the world is?
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1answer
179 views

Is It Correct to Say ‘Need I Not’?

Need is utilised as a normal and also a modal verb (similar to ‘can’, ‘shall’...). e.g. I don’t need; I need not. Is it correct to say need I not or needn’t I for the interrogative form?
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1answer
643 views

“What have we here?” vs. “What do we have here?” [closed]

Could someone explain which structure is correct and if it's okay to say the other one? Oh, what have we here? Oh, what do we have here? Can we simply invert the subject and the verb to ...
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2answers
2k views

If and Whether - or not? Interrogative and Conditional words

It's clear to me that in some situations, "if" works but "whether" does not: 1a) If it rains, I shall take my umbrella. 1b) Call me if rain is predicted. Also some where only "whether or not" will ...
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4answers
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What is the origin of auxiliary verbs?

When and why did we start using auxiliary verbs, particularly "do", to ask questions and make negatives?
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1answer
215 views

Is this sentence grammatically correct? “Isn't it only you who have that book?”

Instead of saying: "It's only you who have that book, isn't it?" can we say, "Isn't it only you who have that book?"
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7answers
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“which day is Friday” vs. “what day is Friday”

Thanks to: "Which" vs. "what" — what's the difference and when should you use one or the other? I know that "what" can replace "which" in the examples below. But which ...
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5answers
439 views

How to categorize this phrase. Relative clause, Interrogative clause, Adverbial clause?

What is "Where to go" in the sentence "Where to go is the question." Is it a adverbial phrase or a relative clause? And what is "Why go" in the sentence "Why go when you can stay?" - is it a clause?
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1answer
104 views

How else can we say “what number are you in the line”? [duplicate]

Is there any way to rephrase "what number are you in the line"?
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3answers
1k views

If we can say 'Where are you going to?', why don't we say 'Where do you live in?'?

In most cases 'where' seems to be substituting for a prepositional phrase. As in: - Where do you live? / I live in Brighton. Where does the train stop? / It stops at Reading and Bristol. So why is ...
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1answer
256 views

Asking questions without subject-verb inversion — a new trend?

I don't know what it is called but I have seen people using the sentence which is the answer of some question as question itself. For example: You are going to play tennis? (this isn't much ...
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4answers
698 views

Can I put the question word “where” at the end of a question? [closed]

I got this sentence from a Primary 5 student's worksheet. According to this passage, this creature can be found where? Some of the parents think that the sentence should be "..., where can ...
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1answer
110 views

“Does our process cause users to abandon tasks they WERE/ARE about to perform?”

I have written the following sentence as part of the conclusion to my thesis. This represents one of the future research questions, i.e., it is not part of my research questions, it is something that ...
3
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4answers
760 views

uncountable noun + and + uncountable noun [duplicate]

Which sounds better? There is water and butter in my fridge. There are water and butter in my fridge. I think it should be: is. But what if we said: How much flour and butter is needed to ...
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2answers
232 views

Whom or who in this case? Google thinks who [duplicate]

I was asking someone "whom were you horrible to?" And thought, is it who or whom? I believe it's whom but when I typed the phrase into Google search It felt differently.
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1answer
334 views

Use of “Could you tell what kind of”

What is the correct use of the verb in the following sentences: Could you tell me what kind of qualifications does a deputy coroner have? Could you tell me what kind of car he owns? What kind of ...
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1answer
201 views

What do you think?

I think of this place as my home. (OALD) Consulting the sentence above, can I make an interrogative as these?: [a] As what do you think of this place? [b] What do you think of this place as? Or ...
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1answer
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“What ever happened to” versus “Whatever happened to”?

I recently asked Whatever happened to (some noun from the past)? But then wondered if I should have preferred to split whatever into two words: What ever happened to (some noun from the ...
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1answer
134 views

The Usage Domains of “why” and “how”

This question was inspired by the this thread over at physics.se. What are the correct uses of "why" and "how" as interrogatives? Do questions that begin with "why" necessarily pursue answers which ...
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2answers
14k views

“Why are you asking?” versus “Why do you ask?”

Why are you asking Tom? He does not know the answer. Ask me instead! versus No, I have not seen Tom for quite some time. Why do you ask? Is it correct? And if it is, why the difference? Is ...
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2answers
586 views

“What / who do think…” structure

Here's a list of examples I've seen: What do you think happened? Who do you think has killed him? Who do you think he killed? How does this structure what/who do you think... ...
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1answer
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Sentence pattern in interrogative sentence

am class 8. My teacher was revising sentence pattern today, I got a thought of asking my friend a question that is: Frame a sentence with pattern of V + S + V + O He couldn't find an answer and ...
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3answers
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“This helps us how?” vs. “How does this help us?”

In the sci-fi movie Inception by Christopher Nolan, in the first level of dreaming, they kidnap Cilian Murphy and Tom Hardy tries to get some information from him, by impersonating Browning, his ...
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1answer
2k views

Must (Past Obligation Interrogative) “Must you have eaten all the food?” [closed]

Is the question "Must you have eaten all the food" correct when used in the past obligatory sense? The best examples I can find are quite ambiguous. "Must He have been less than perfectly kind to ...
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2answers
191 views

“Why the sun shines?”

I've seen questions framed in the following manner many a time: "Why the sun shines?" "Why hair grows?" While the most correct way to frame these kind of questions is obviously: "Why does ...
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1answer
435 views

fused relatives versus interrogatives

Would you differentiate which are relatives and which are interrogatives? (And I want to know the sub-category (sub-name) of each below, if they are.) “You can keep it,” said Harry, laughing at ...
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1answer
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What’s the difference between “how” and “how so”? [closed]

Please tell me the difference between these two questions: how how so Do those two mean the same thing? If they do not, please explain with examples.
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3answers
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“What am I” vs. “who am I”

Yesterday I was going through my son's books and at one place it was written I have a long neck, I have spots on my body — what am I? I thought it should have been I have a long neck, ...