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2
votes
1answer
89 views

Antecedent of “whose common theme is death of fathers” in Hamlet

Here's from Hamlet, Act 1. Scene 2 Claudius: Fie! 'tis a fault to heaven, A fault against the dead, a fault to nature, To reason most absurd; whose common theme Is death of ...
3
votes
1answer
110 views

Meaning of: “The trouble ain't that there is too many fools, but that the lightning ain't distributed right”

This is a Mark Twain aphorism: The trouble ain't that there is too many fools, but that the lightning ain't distributed right. This is apparently intended to be easily understood, but the ...
1
vote
0answers
35 views

“For food and diet to some enterprise that hath a stomach in't” [closed]

Here are some lines from Hamlet, Act 1, Scene 1 (The Arden Shakespeare edited by Harold Jenkins) His fell to Hamlet. Now sir, young Fortinbras, Of unimproved mettle, hot and full, Hath ...
1
vote
0answers
58 views

Forgiving our Fathers [closed]

Forgiving our Fathers by Dick Lourie maybe in a dream: he's in your power you twist his arm but you're not sure it was he that stole your money you feel calmer and you decide to let ...
1
vote
1answer
97 views

“Elves and Men, the Firstborn and the Followers”

This is a quote from Silmarillion, but I really do not know if there are two meanings or one. Because on my language this "Followers" can means that come after the Firstborn or those who likes ...
0
votes
2answers
80 views

Is the usage of “forfeit” correct here?

«The FAIR Act would change federal law and protect the rights of property owners by requiring that the government prove its case with clear and convincing evidence before forfeiting seized property.» ...
4
votes
3answers
694 views

How to understand these verses from the poem “The road not taken” by Robert Frost

I actually have two questions regarding this poem: The Road Not Taken by Robert Frost Two roads diverged in a yellow wood, And sorry I could not travel both And be one traveler, ...
0
votes
1answer
79 views

“Damage to the undercarriage; damage caused by water”

Does this phrase mean that damages to the undercarriage caused by water is not covered, OR does it mean damage to the undercarriage is not covered regardless of the cause, and that damage to the ...
0
votes
1answer
63 views

Meaning of ' as long as you fed him, he would be cooperative' [closed]

About the meaning of the sentence 'as long as you fed him, he would be cooperative': (1) The clause 'as long as you fed him' is about past or present one? (2) Depending on the above, the 'would' at ...
0
votes
1answer
82 views

Two types of the definite article

I have a question regarding the usage of the definite article. Here is an excerpt: Those were the days of lofty promises made by a hopeful candidate. Today, we are faced with the disappointing ...
0
votes
4answers
395 views

Would you tell me the difference between object and objective as a noun?

I am very confused. Could you possibly elaborate (in detail) the reason why: My object is to improve my English as much as possible. [WRONG it should be 'objective'] My object is to learn ...
-1
votes
1answer
33 views

Condition interpretation - Mathematics

Condition is read as below:- Where juniors who have completed their qualifying or eligibility service are being considered for promotion, their seniors would also be considered provided they are not ...
0
votes
2answers
52 views

Adjective, “but” adjective question

How about a burger? Delicious, but healthy? Is the proper interpretation of the second phrase ("Delicious, but healthy?") what follows below? The part that comes before the comma should be ...
-1
votes
1answer
69 views

What does “With a team” mean? [closed]

Does the phrase "with a team" imply that the speaker is on the team, or rather that the speaker is explicitly not on the team (of course it may also be ambiguous)?
0
votes
0answers
44 views

Signing off with “Best” instead of “Best regards” [duplicate]

I'm active on many different online forums and platforms and do much communication with my own customers and customers of a company I am employed at. The signature I used to sign off a post or email ...
0
votes
3answers
2k views

Does the sentence “What the fox say?” mean anything?

In the lyrics for the song "What does the fox say" the following sentence appears. "What the fox say"[sic] It uses the word "say" and not "says", and there is no "does". Does the sentence make ...
1
vote
1answer
152 views

How should this sentence be interpreted?

So I am reading the essay "On Some Verses of Virgil" by Michel de Montaigne (translation by Donald M. Frame) and I came across this particular sentence. Is there any ugliness in doing wrong that ...
1
vote
2answers
105 views

Finding the correct interpretation of “Every X [units of time], at maximum/minimum.”

I've recently been involved in a discussion over different interpretations of the following sentence (paraphrased): Users may update their information every two weeks, at maximum. The intended ...
1
vote
1answer
76 views

Contradictory meanings of 'sick'

We usually use the word 'sick' to refer to something that you are tired of or don't like. So it is quite clear when we say I'm sea-sick, that we mean, one is sick of travelling by sea (eg: boat) ...
1
vote
1answer
65 views

What does this sentence about 'ὑπό' mean?

Wiktionary has the description of meaning for the ancient Greek word 'ὑπό': under, that is, (with the genitive) of place (beneath), or with verbs (the agency or means, through); (with the ...
6
votes
4answers
715 views

What does the initial fragment of The Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy mean?

I begun reading Douglas Adams' The Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy. This is one of the initial fragments, emphasis mine: This planet has - or rather had - a problem, which was this: most of ...
2
votes
3answers
180 views

What does this intricate sentence mean? [closed]

What does this bold part mean? It doesn't make any sense. What did he want to say here? ...
0
votes
2answers
210 views

Meaning of 'pedal' in sentence?

What does the following sentence mean: “Mattan and the yellow jersey were right in the middle of the pack as it peddled hard in the blistering heat.”? I don't understand what "peddle" means in ...
-5
votes
1answer
67 views

How to comprehend “The output should be false.”? [closed]

Consider a function in a computer program which returns a boolean value (true or false). The output should be false。 can be interpreted as either of the following two: 1. As we expected, the output ...
0
votes
3answers
84 views

What does “these things are in the ether” mean?

What does "these things are in the ether" mean? The context of the sentence is My own daughters' names are Freya, a more popular name across the pond than in the US, and Calla, which last trended ...
0
votes
1answer
77 views

How should this be read? [closed]

We all know that you do not belong here, have no idea what you are talking about, and can't actually script. Should this be interpreted as We all know that you do not belong here You ...
2
votes
2answers
122 views

What does the author mean by “door culture” in this context?

What does the author mean by "door culture" in this context? First-order effects I take to be a metaphor with economics. However, I don't understand how to translate my understanding of "first-order ...
0
votes
0answers
44 views

Is the English correct? What's the best translation or interpretation? [duplicate]

I'm reading a technical IT document that can be found here. So, the question is, in the phrasebelow: A challenge password is it correct write "a" instead of "an"? Why? What is its' best ...
0
votes
3answers
210 views

Literally vs. figuratively: how literally is literally? [closed]

I'm sensitive to the fact that in light of recent events, the example discussed in this question may be unsettling to some. For that, I apologize, but I cannot think of an effective alternative. In ...
-1
votes
1answer
26k views

What does “mother father gentleman” mean? [closed]

How should I interpret the phrase "mother father gentleman" in a recently popularized song entitled gentleman? What is the purpose of describing gentleman with mother and father? Is this just a slang ...
1
vote
1answer
319 views

Rhetorical analysis — compare? [closed]

Can someone please explain similarities and differences between rhetorical analysis and close reading?
1
vote
2answers
131 views

Kiwi Power Green - is that more Kiwi “Power Green” or more “Kiwi Power” Green?

Recently my wife bought a piece of toddler swimwear for our little ones. A crisp, flashy neon green cute little piece of garment that had a label on which the color name was written: "KIWI POWER ...
0
votes
2answers
139 views

Interpretation of paragraph in Homer's Iliad Book II [56] translated by Samuel Butler

I'm having some problem understanding the phrase "but do you others go about among the host and prevent their doing so" in the context of the following paragraph: The dream then vanished and I ...
1
vote
1answer
130 views

On the interpretation of “walked to the station at 9 o'clock” [closed]

I want to confirm what a book says. It says: I went to the station at 9 o'clock. I walked to the station at 9 o'clock. Sentence (1) has the following two meaning: a. I left for the station at 9 ...
1
vote
1answer
346 views

Can someone please explain the following passage from Milton's Paradise Lost?

I understand all the words, but not quite the meaning of the following passage, from Milton's Paradise Lost, Book I: 635 For me be witness all the host of heaven, 636 If counsels different, or ...
3
votes
1answer
1k views

Interpretation of “The biggest thing to happen to iPhone since iPhone”

When I read the phrase The biggest thing to happen to iPhone since iPhone I interpreted it to imply that the first occurrence of iPhone happened to itself -- that is, the first iPhone ...
2
votes
2answers
355 views

Failed Experiment? [closed]

Is it proper to use the phrase "failed experiment" at all? And if so, should it refer exclusively to experiments that had some ineluctable flaw in the process of their implementation or can it also ...
3
votes
1answer
2k views

What does “I'll kill that cat” in the play Dinner for One mean?

In the play Dinner for One, James the butler says, "I'll kill that cat," at time 14:05. What does this mean? Is he referring to the tiger rug which keeps tripping him, or is it a saying or ...
3
votes
2answers
166 views

How to interpret “…the disinfectant burnt her inside out, of course”

A character in a play is talking about how a girl committed suicide by swallowing strong disinfectant, but it's "burnt her inside out" that I'm questioning. It may be possible to interpret it in both ...
1
vote
3answers
1k views

Is “gilded” usually associated with gold as an element or as a colour?

I know that gilded means covered or highlighted with gold or something of a golden color So it can be associated both with gold as a chemical element or just the colour. Some situations might ...
3
votes
3answers
2k views

Divided by half - meaning

If someone says "Fifteen divided by half", I would interpret that literally to mean 15/0.5, or 30. However, I usually see it interpreted as 15/2, or 7.5. Which interpretation is correct?
3
votes
4answers
359 views

Is cruel standard use as a noun in poetry? Are there terms for non-standard English specifically in regard to use in poetry?

I hope this question isn't off-topic. I heard a madrigal with the following verse which bothers me somewhat, grammatically. Cruel, wilt thou persever? Peace to leave ever? Peace shalt thou have and ...
8
votes
2answers
163 views

A question of interpretation: single word parenthesis

To my mind this: Entity foo varies seemingly at random. is semantically equivalent to this: Entity foo varies, seemingly, at random. However, is this necessarily the case? What ...
1
vote
2answers
332 views

Could “extraordinary few exceptions” be correct?

In his 1991 book, historian J.B. Russel writes: with extraordinary few exceptions no educated person ... believed that the earth was flat Should extraordinary be an adverb, or could this ...
6
votes
6answers
831 views

The word 'not' often doesn't mean total negation in mathematical sense?

Consider the following conversations: X1: I paid $10 for that hamburger. Y1: That's not cheap! X2: I pay $1 for broadband Internet access. Y2: That's cheap! X3: I paid $1 for a hot ...