Words such as "oh", or "wow", which are used to indicate an isolated emotion on the part of the speaker, without an explicit grammatical relationship to the rest of the sentence.

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79 views

Is there a name/term for “multiplied vowels”?

For example if somebody is saying: "Ooooooh myyyyyyy Gooooood" or if they realize something and go "Ooooooh!" or Darth Vader's "NOOOOOOO!", usually all of these extra vowels aren't included in the ...
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2answers
132 views

An interjection/expression for expressing nostalgia

What is an interjection/expression to use to express nostalgia? I was listening to a song which reminded me of my adolescent days, feeling nostalgic for those times. Are there kinds of nostalgia? ...
2
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3answers
334 views

Interjection said to a fisherman/angler for good luck

In some other languages, there are interjections said to a fisherman (especially to an angler) for good luck, other than "good luck!" itself. Is there any in English too? I suppose, "good luck" is ...
2
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3answers
226 views

Why is there “the” in “oh the horror”?

I am wondering about the interjection "oh, the horror!". If it should be treated as an interjection directed to "horror" (there are similar expressions in other languages), why does it use the article ...
0
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1answer
67 views

What's the origin of the “surprise!” interjection?

This interjection is perhaps most commonly associated with surprise parties, where the person in whose honour the party is held is made unaware, until an opportune moment where the participants leap ...
5
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1answer
288 views

Interjection for a longing sigh

Is there an injection or at least an onomatopoeia for a longing sigh that works in writing? An example would be two colleagues are talking about the new member of the team on which one has a huge ...
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2answers
124 views

Word for an interjection made when drinking

Is there a word to describe a traditional interjection (in any language) made before drinking? Examples include: Cheers! (English) ¡Salud! (Spanish) Prost! (German) !לחיים (Hebrew) A close fit ...
0
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1answer
187 views

Commas between interjectional elements [duplicate]

If one wanted to say something like no commas: Hello Pete, how are you? or commas: Thanks, Julia, this will be helpful! would he need commas separating the different elements in the ...
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2answers
95 views

“Enter the Fairies” after a sudden clatter or crash?

In my family, who originate from Scotalnd, people cry "enter the fairies!" if something has caused a sudden crash, smash or clatter. I am guessing it comes from a stage direction, such as from ...
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1answer
257 views

Diagramming and use of please as interjection

When diagramming the sentence, "Simon, would you please sing now?", should I diagram Simon or you as the subject? Would you be diagrammed as pronoun and please as an interjection? I am trying to help ...
3
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3answers
436 views

Is any utterance in English used only by men or only by women?

In my native language, there are some interjections used only by women. For example Va (pronounced /vʌ/), is an exclamation used to express surprise only by women. If any man happens to use them, he ...
4
votes
1answer
752 views

What is the correct way to write the interjection “ha ha?”

I had a hard time finding the English origin of this interjection and how it technically should be written. I am often ridiculed in written conversations, especially those that are informal, because I ...
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3answers
770 views

You don't want to answer this word-placement question, now do you?

Prompted by this question I got to thinking about the placement of the word now. If it's placed before the comma, it refers to an immediate condition: You don't want to answer this word-placement ...
2
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2answers
212 views

Is it correct English to turn interjections such as “ah”, “oh”, “um” “huh”, “hem” into verbs?

For example: she ahhed/ohhed/ummed/huhhed/hemmed. Or is this possible only with some interjections?
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5answers
390 views

What is a more modern variant of the interjection 'Lo!"

What is a more modern variant of the interjection 'Lo!" I'm looking for a single word which has the same effect but is less archaic. It is a very formal context I want to use it in that you may ...
2
votes
1answer
175 views

Punctuation after the interjection “by heaven” [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: Exclamation marks in the middle of a sentence How would you punctuate the following phrase with "by heaven"? It was used by a cricket commentator. By heaven ...
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4answers
600 views

Usage of “as if” as interjection

My question concerns the usage of "as if" as an idiomatic interjection. The references I have consulted (etymonline, online dictionaries, etc.) seem to agree that "as if" is used in this context to ...
3
votes
1answer
1k views

What is the origin of the dated British expression “I say!”

It doesn't appear that this expression was a minced oath or something along those lines. Was it shortened from a longer phrase, or did it just enter the vernacular as is (similar to "listen up" or ...
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3answers
7k views

“Oh, dear!” vs. “Oh dear!”

Which is correct, "Oh, dear!" or "Oh dear!"? My understanding is that the word oh is an interjection, and should thus be followed by a comma. However, is the second usage the correct one because the ...
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5answers
737 views

What are specific cartoon-type interjections like “cough” and “sigh” called in English?

In comics, for example those by Walt Disney, interjections that describe or emphasize in words what the characters in the image are doing are quite commonly used (cough, sigh, tweet). According to ...
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3answers
899 views

What's the origin of saying “yoo hoo!” to get someone's attention?

A character in D.H. Lawrence's novel Women in Love (published 1920) calls out, "Shu-hu!" to hail her sister in a crowded place. This must be the same as "yoo hoo". What is the source of this ...
10
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1answer
9k views

Yes, no, adverbs, and interjections

There appears to be some disagreement over what function yes and no perform in the following sentences: Yes, you are right. No, you are mistaken. According to ODO (yes, no), they are being used as ...
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3answers
6k views

'What ho!' of Bertie Wooster

"What ho!" - this strange form of greeting is used all the time by Bertie Wooster, a character of well-known "Jeeves and Wooster" stories by P. G. Wodehouse. Bertie Wooster: Oh, what ho, Sir ...
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6answers
8k views

Hip Hip Hooray!

I am looking for the etymology and history of the cheer “Hip Hip Hooray”. I’m curious due to its interesting entry in Wikipedia, which reads thusly: The call was recorded in England in the ...
0
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1answer
804 views

Is it 'bye from now' or 'bye for now'?

I often hear it in the end of the radio programs. Are they saying 'bye from now' or 'bye for now'? Some times they say 'bye from/for me' if there are more than one person. What do they mean?
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3answers
714 views

How should “aargh” really be pronounced?

The common interjections "argh!", "aargh!", "aaargh!", etc., is pronounced, as far as I know, the same as "aaa!" For most of my life, however, I (and I imagine many other second language speakers) ...
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4answers
2k views

What part of speech are non-human “interjections” like “oink” and “bang”?

As a spin-off from this comment: If a human exclaims something like "ouch!", I believe it's considered an interjection. But if a pig exclaims "oink!", what is the part of speech? And if a bell goes ...
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4answers
13k views

Interjection for the sound of a bell

I saw this other question, but it's not quite what I'm asking. A bell makes a sound. How would you write that sound in English? As an interjection, e.g. "boom!" I'm sure it varies with the type and ...
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5answers
310 views

Grammatical explanation of “what the blank”

In emphatic questions, it's common to see or hear an interjection such as the heck — or something more vulgar — between the interrogative and the verb. What was that? becomes What the heck ...
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6answers
6k views

Would “Greetings” be a better word to greet someone any time than the word “Hello”?

Would "greetings" be a better word to greet someone anytime than the word "hello"? Let say I meet Mr. Jackson at 2pm and Mr. Anderson at 7pm. Would it be better to greet them as "Greetings Mr. ...
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3answers
445 views

Would “well done” also apply to a presently proceeding action?

Would "well done" also apply to a case, in which the performer of the action, the one for which he is receiving a praise, is still performing it at the moment of receiving the praise, in other words, ...
2
votes
1answer
1k views

Where does “goodness me” come from?

The expression “my goodness” always seemed clear to me, as it is a simple bowdlerisation of “my God”, as are many expletives. However, I have heard many times the expression “goodness me!”, which ...
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2answers
139 views

Use of “measles” as an interjection

I have a friend from Illinois USA who uses measles as an exclamation of frustration or disappointment. For example, Measles! My flight was just canceled. I find this odd. Is it commonly used ...
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2answers
5k views

Origin of the word “duh”

What is the origin of the word "duh" as in the interjection: — It's hot in the desert. — Well, duh! If it is of onomatopoeic origin and only appears in modern English as some sites suggest, I ...
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3answers
6k views

Origin of 'tada'

What is the origin of the word tada — as used as an exclamation? Is it an onomatopoeic form of sound effects used in, say, television or does its origin lie elsewhere?
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1answer
144 views

How is “brrm” pronounced?

I find some interjections to be too tricky to pronounce. Can anyone help me with this one? Is there any specialized dictionary that reports the pronunciation of interjections?
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2answers
11k views

Origin of “man!”, “(oh) boy!”, and “oh brother”

Where did these interjections: man! (oh) boy! oh brother come from, and why are they all male? If you don’t know their current meanings as interjections, it sounds very strange to say Man! when ...
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3answers
9k views

Does the interjection “steady on!” mean something to a Brit?

More from the BBC adaptation of Charles Dickens' Bleak House. In this particular scene, one character, Sergeant George, is infuriated at another character, Mr. Smallwood, his petty landlord come to ...
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3answers
2k views

use of the interjection “but lo' …”

In an article I tried to understand (the german understanding) of: (...) we’re outside the part of C where the standard Dirichlet series actually converges. But lo’ we can ask what’s the ...
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1answer
246 views

Is there another interjection that can be used in this example?

'O people!' Can anyone give me an alternative interjection for 'O' in this example?
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2answers
2k views

Where does the use of “why” as an interjection come from?

Examples: Why, I'd love to. Why, of course! I get the concept of starting a sentence with a word not completely related to the overall response, but this one seems to be a particularly ...
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2answers
6k views

Common interjections / exclamations in English [closed]

What are the interjections / exclamations commonly used in English (e.g. aha, wow, eh, etc.)? I'd appreciate if you can provide me with a full list with the meaning of each term.
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5answers
4k views

Origin of the phrase “Oh, Dear!”

When something bad happens, sometimes you'll hear Oh, dear! or Oh, dear me! Why is this? Is it a shorter version of another phrase that makes sense in these situations?
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5answers
450 views

What's a common interjection for the reaction to something creepy and disgusting (like some insects or spooky places, etc.)?

For example, A: - Look! There is a centipede on the table! B: - (interjection)!
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2answers
4k views

What is it called when an interjection is inserted inside another word?

Typically (as far as I can think), the interject is something vulgar. For example: Radio-bloody-active (from an episode of Family Guy) Ri-god-damn-diculuous Un-fucking-believable" What is the ...
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2answers
2k views

What does “boy” mean here?

Recently, in a magazine, I read the following line: It's been an eventful year and boy, has it flown past! My question is, what does the word "boy" mean here? Is it an idiom? What is its usage?
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1answer
917 views

What is the grammatical structure of this sentence?

A particular kind of sentence seems a bit strange to me... it might be, for example, "How interesting it was to see him go!" or... "How dreadful I felt when I heard those words." Are they ...
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3answers
4k views

How to use the expression “lo and behold”

How should this expression be used, and what is its origin?
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5answers
2k views

Is it a splice comma if an interjection-phrase is involved?

It's certainly poor style, if not actually wrong, to join independent clauses with a comma when a semicolon or other punctuation would have sufficed. But interjections are usually offset from other ...
6
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1answer
768 views

Interjection “et voilà”

I know et voilà is a French interjection and means there it is. It is very much used in the US. Why is the use of et voilà so popular in the US? Which historical fact has made it so popular?