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0answers
9 views

Why are “strauss's” and “chris mccandless's” prevalent? [duplicate]

Why "Strauss's" and "McCandless's" are prevalent. Isn't their spelling wrong? The correct ones as my school teachers taught should be "Strauss'" and "McCandless'", or am I (taught) wrong?
1
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1answer
126 views

Is there a word or phrase to describe ambiguous sarcasm?

To be specific, this statement refers to a phrase in which the writer/speaker's intention of being sarcastic is not disclosed to the reader/listener (deliberately or accidentally). The effect strongly ...
12
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7answers
1k views

Deriving a word for the activity of using a tool from the tool name (“grep”)

In a discussion that involves talking about the program named "grep", the activity of applying the program to some data is often referred to as "greping". I was writing - still informally - about ...
0
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1answer
58 views

What noun describes “turning a cardinal number into an ordinal number”?

If I take a singular noun like 'person' and turn it into its plural 'people', I think I'm doing pluralisation (or, if you insist, pluralization). What am I doing if I take a cardinal number like '13' ...
3
votes
1answer
88 views

wooden, golden, oaken - Genitive?

A few nouns can be transformed into an adjective meaning "made of that noun (also: being like that noun)" by adding -en. golden, wooden, oaken, stonen Are those remnants of an old noun ...
0
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2answers
427 views

In how many inflectional forms can a verb be written English?

I want to know the number of inflectional forms of a verb. I came to know from one of my colleagues that a verb has 13 inflectional forms ('conjugations,' that's what he named it). Is it true?
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votes
2answers
243 views

There seems to be a subtle difference between the infinitive form of the verb 'to be' after a verb and the inflected form of the same; what is it?

There seems to be a subtle difference between the infinitive form of the verb 'to be' after a verb and the inflected form of the same; what is it? This effect, if there is one, seems most noticeable ...
0
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1answer
1k views

What's the difference between “inferencing” and “inferring”?

I have encountered the words "inferencing" and "inferring" in literature on educational research. Is there a difference in meaning between the words inferencing and inferring? Just as an ...
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2answers
2k views

“sunk” or “sunken”?

The boat lies half-sunken in the bay. Sunken is an adjective, right? But in the previous sentence, it seems to be acting as adverb modifying lies. Should the sentence be: The boat ...
1
vote
2answers
75 views

What's the adjective of “conspectus”?

This is a well-written conspectus for a project. Since it's very well written, it makes the project ?conspectible. Apparently, conspectible is not recognized by the dictionaries I've checked. ...
1
vote
2answers
217 views

Speculable or Speculatable?

In the field of programming, we know a function is "safe to speculatively execute" if it has no side-effects. Is there a single word which can describe this attribute? Speculable? Speculatable? ...
0
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1answer
259 views

?thesaurical, adj

The adjectival form of thesaurus does not seem to have been listed on (all) standard dictionaries. However, thesaurical occurs in literature1 and is also defined in Urban Dictionary. Do we have an ...
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1answer
493 views

Many French loanwords lost their inflections (for example the irregular plural inflection x) when borrowed into the English language

except the gender inflection in words like fiancé and fiancée. Would the reason lie in the fact that maybe these words have not been around for a long period of time so they kept their original ...
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6answers
4k views

Frequent use of word not found in dictionary, “programatically.”

Here's a word I see often on StackOverflow, "programatically." Used to indicate that a programmer intends to do something within the code of a program, rather than through user interaction. For ...