Questions about verbs in their basic (unmarked) forms, such as “be”, “do”, “have”, or “sit”, sometimes introduced by the particle “to” and other times used by itself.

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3
votes
2answers
106 views

“to require someone to do something” vs “to require that someone do something”

Professor required his students to return their papers typed. vs Professor required that his students return their papers typed. Which of the examples is correct? Do they have ...
-1
votes
2answers
252 views

going + ing vs going + infinitive, when use which?

In the middle of a conversation I should use which of the follow sentences: Tomorrow, I'm going climbing. or Tomorrow, I'm going to climb. I did a deep search and I found these similar ...
2
votes
1answer
59 views

Why is “to” not appropriate before “be” in this situation?

Consider the following two phrases: It's better to be <X> than <Y>. Why be <X> when you can be <Y>? I recently got in an argument with a friend about if (and why) there ...
2
votes
1answer
80 views

Using a perfect infinitive construction to express uncertainty

My sentence: " I needed for her to have called me." The only example that I can find is from google books- title: The Ghost of Samuel Cetawayo" with a similar use of the perfect infinitive: "I had ...
0
votes
1answer
29 views

Infinitive modifier subject or object or depends on context

I gave her medicine to keep from falling sick. Is this sentence right? Intended meaning is that I have a friend who is not feeling well therefore, I gave her medicine so that she will not be ...
0
votes
1answer
81 views

Gerund vs infinitive paraphrase

Is there any difference between these two sentences: "The Democrats tend to increase taxes, discouraging rich people from voting for them" "The Democrats tend to increase taxes, which discourages ...
-1
votes
1answer
134 views

Do “it is time for someone to do something” and “it is time someone did something” mean the same thing?

I know that It is time (understood: for the speaker or for a group of people including the speaker) to do something. and It is time I or we did something. do not mean the same thing: the first is ...
1
vote
0answers
102 views

What are the grammatical phrases in this sentence?

I'm analyzing this sentence and scanning it for prepositional, appositive and verbal phrases. In the sentence so far as I can tell there is only one prepositional and no appositive and no verbals ...
0
votes
0answers
28 views

[infinitive]How is it to work as a teacher? vs How is to work as a teacher?

How is it to work as a teacher? vs How is to work as a teacher? I think the first sentence has one superfluous word, 'it'. I sure know 'it' refers to 'to work as a teacher?' Why do you use the first ...