Questions about verbs in their basic (unmarked) forms, such as “be”, “do”, “have”, or “sit”, sometimes introduced by the particle “to” and other times used by itself.

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How does the to infinitive work with adjectives like “wrong” and “wise”?

You were wrong to pick that car I was wise to go home that day. I can't quite explain how the to-infinitive modifies the adjectives here. It's similar to sentences like "It's nice to see ...
0
votes
1answer
52 views

infinitive as indirect object

is it possible to use infinitive as indirect object ? for example the sentence ' I persuaded him to go there ' , I guess that 'him' is direct object and 'to go there' is indirect object . is it ...
0
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1answer
34 views

Adverbial clause modification with an infinitive

Given the sentence I am unable to join you while I am on vacation "While I am on vacation" is an adverbial clause supplying the time when this sentence is true. But, does this clause modify the ...
0
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1answer
443 views

Why is the sentence “I go to the US for studying English.” wrong?

I heard the sentence "I go to the US for studying English." is wrong. Can the preposition "for" as purpose be used in this case? Could you teach me the reason why this sentence is wrong?
0
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3answers
37 views

Infinitive verses present participle

I often come across this type of thing and wondered if anyone could tell me the correct usage. I have a sentence that reads "As you go through various settings, you will have the option to allow ...
4
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5answers
20k views

When is “to” a preposition and when the infinitive marker?

I want to see you. I look forward to seeing you. How can one say "to" in the first sentence is an infinitive marker and in the second sentence a preposition when we are given just the ...
2
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3answers
27 views

A question regarding the following usage of the perfect infinitive?

In regards to the usage of the perfect infinitive I've been wondering if it can be used simultaneously with verbs of perception by way of expressing your notion or belief involving either a person or ...
0
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4answers
98 views

“hope…to win the approval” - help identify parts of speech

I'm confused by this sentence: "Lakesha hopes to win the approval of her mother by switching her major from fine arts to med." I think that in this case hope is intransitive, and I think the ...
2
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0answers
46 views

“going to die” vs “to die” [migrated]

My SO from Japan contemplates two phrases: "We are going to die eventually." "We are to die eventually." Why does sentence 1. sound more correct? Is sentence 2. correct at all?
2
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1answer
164 views

Using a perfect infinitive construction to express uncertainty

My sentence: " I needed for her to have called me." The only example that I can find is from google books- title: The Ghost of Samuel Cetawayo" with a similar use of the perfect infinitive: "I had ...
1
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2answers
23 views

'Expect to' as an expression of excitement?

In a recent test we asked students to write a sentence expressing their excitement at a future activity. We gave an example sentence using 'looking forward to'. One student wrote "I'm expecting to ...
0
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1answer
80 views

Infinitive instead of gerund, specifically after 'require'

I use Grammarly Chrome extension to validate my texts in English. And with some sentences I keep seeing the error message "Infinitive instead of gerund". I'm not sure if this is an appropriate error ...
-1
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1answer
406 views

Do “it is time for someone to do something” and “it is time someone did something” mean the same thing? [duplicate]

I know that It is time (understood: for the speaker or for a group of people including the speaker) to do something. and It is time I or we did something. do not mean the same thing: the first is ...
2
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1answer
20 views

Is `limited to viewing` correct in this context? Your account is `limited to` viewing only the first 100 pictures

As the title says, is limited to correct in that context? Let's say for instance that Facebook offers free and paid account and Facebook only allows free account to view the first 100 pictures of ...
0
votes
1answer
37 views

Difference between using a gerund and using to + verb root

As an objective (or subjective). "Being a teacher" vs "to be a teacher". What is the difference between gerund and 'to' + verb root ? My dream is being a teacher. My dream is to be a teacher.
5
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5answers
40k views

“Plan to do” vs. “plan on doing”

What are the differences between the following? He is planning to do something. He is planning on doing something. When to use each?
0
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0answers
13 views

“celebrating” or “to celebrate”?

The following sentences are the same except the bold parts. Which of the following sentences sounds natural to native speakers of English? A, B or both? A: Farmers who are growing rice for profit ...
0
votes
0answers
21 views

Verbs used as infintives

I want to go home. We come to help him. He was the first guy in our crowd to marry. Why "to go" is use as a noun vs. "to help" is used as an adverb vs. "to marry" is used as an adjective?
2
votes
1answer
58 views

Using too many 'to's in a sentence?

This may be more of a stylistic question than anything else, but I'm hoping for some general rules about using the word 'to' in a sentence and when it might be used too many times. For example, I'm ...
1
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1answer
89 views

Omitting verbs, is it correct?

I wonder if I could omit the second 'visit' in such sentence: You have to visit all the places, which she wants to (visit) Would it be correct? Thanks in advance :)
0
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1answer
35 views

I want to know usage of infinitive as adverb

for example. she lived to be ninety what does that sentence mean? Is it meaning of "she lived in order to be ninety" or "she lived and just became ninety"? I have learned it as she lived and ...
4
votes
1answer
69 views

What is the rule for two verb tenses in one sentence? [closed]

Example: I heard the bomb go off. Why is the first verb in the Past tense and the second in the Present tense?
1
vote
1answer
65 views

To + verb, bare verb or verb + ing in noun phrases [duplicate]

I've asked this around and I'm RACKING MY BRAIN trying to figure it out. Which one is the correct verb form in the following sentence? The craziest thing I've ever done is go / to go / going ...
2
votes
1answer
179 views

Using a “to-infinitive” after coordinating conjunctions (e.g., “and”) or not?

I am wondering whether the "to" should be repeated after a coordinating conjunction or not. For example, a) [...] practical examples to round up the learning experience and provide the tools for ...
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1answer
24 views

Is this a valid construction using the the perfect infinitive

Is it correct to say " In order to have been". I understand that without context the general meaning may be difficult to interpret, but could this even be used as a valid construction with the ...
4
votes
2answers
169 views

I have a bodyguard in order to protect myself

I have a bodyguard in order to protect myself. I was told that I cannot have a stative verb in the required condition: I have a bodyguard But I don't understand how "I need to study in ...
0
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1answer
99 views

Correct verb patterns for the verb 'recommend'? [duplicate]

Which of the last three verb patterns apply to the verb 'recommend'? I recommend that you wait. (present subjunctive, American usage) I recommend that you should wait. (substitute for present ...
2
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1answer
55 views

Can an infinitive phrase be equivocal in its function in a sentence?

I have found the following sentence as an example of an infinitive phrase used as an adjective, however, it seems to me that it could also be taken as an adverb of purpose. Jane bought a radio to ...
13
votes
4answers
45k views

“I like to do (be) something” vs “I like doing (being) something”

This is what I read in an answer to a previous question: Verbs Followed by Either Gerund or Infinitive Sometimes the meaning changes according to the verb used. <…> (dis)like ...
6
votes
3answers
20k views

“Stop working” vs “stopped to work”

I want to know, is there any difference between "stop + v.(ing)" and "stopped to + v.". These are example sentences. I stop working for a month. vs I stopped to work for a month. I stop watching ...
8
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3answers
2k views

Help identifying an error type “tried to help me learning”

I have a friend from Russia who is trying to learn English and recently used the sentence "He tried to help me learning..." (implied: the English language) It is obviously wrong and I corrected it ...
1
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1answer
64 views

To do something is something - what use of the infinitive is this?

I teach English and a student of mine recently came out with the following sentence: She thinks that to become a marketing manager is the opportunity she seeks for. I thought this was a curious ...
2
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1answer
84 views

Important to learn is this stuff

This song is fun to sing. This pizza is too hot to eat. Is the infinitive there considered a complement of the predicate adjective?
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1answer
74 views

Not sure if this is correct or not: “the ability to be able to”

The sentence: Problems are an inevitable part of life, and one could argue that happiness is not the absence of problems, but rather the ability to be able to deal with them. Is it to be ...
1
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4answers
132 views

“It is better to X than to Y” - the structure of a difficult comparative sentence

Take the following sentence: It is better to underestimate your abilities and overestimate your risks than to go in a direction that actually involves more uncertainty than you can justify. For ...
1
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1answer
92 views

To Infinitive or Not Infinitive

I am wondering if the lack of infinitive "to+have" in the section highlighted below raises any flags for anyone. People have been taught have faith and to trust — or not have faith and not to ...
-1
votes
2answers
86 views

Split infinitives [duplicate]

Was taught in grammar school that this was taboo (1950's, South Africa). Today the split infinitive seems to be the standard in the USA. Changing standard? It's always even that way in the US? What ...
0
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2answers
118 views

Infinitive modifier subject or object or depends on context

I gave her medicine to keep from falling sick. Is this sentence right? Intended meaning is that I have a friend who is not feeling well therefore, I gave her medicine so that she will not be ...
10
votes
5answers
666 views

How to use the infinitive in this sentence?

I am doing documentation for a web application issue and I'm not sure how best to word what I'm trying to say: "This appears to work no longer in any web browser." "This appears no longer to ...
2
votes
2answers
645 views

What's to do? vs. What's to be done?

In order to ask What should be done? or What should we do? using an infinitival clause, you can readily say What's to be done? or What to do?. (1) What's to do? But I've heard (1) used in the ...
0
votes
1answer
109 views

What part of speech is the word “to” in “Alice likes to dance”? [closed]

Annie likes to dance What part of speech is the word to? Reopen note: Merriam Webster lists it as a preposition and gives the following definition: 8 —used as a function word to indicate ...
0
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3answers
66 views

The police officer ordered the gunman (to) drop his weapon

(1) The police officer ordered that the gunman drop his weapon. (2) The police officer ordered the gunman to drop his weapon. I think these mean virtually the same. Perhaps, the act of ...
5
votes
5answers
2k views

“to require someone to do something” vs “to require that someone do something”

Professor required his students to return their papers typed. vs Professor required that his students return their papers typed. Which of the examples is correct? Do they have ...
3
votes
4answers
6k views

Is there a difference between “way of doing something” and “way to do something”?

Is there a difference between "way of doing something" and "way to do something"? It is on purpose that I did not write "a way of doing something" or "the way of doing something" and "a way to do ...
2
votes
1answer
102 views

Is there a difference between an adverb and an adjectival complement?

Consider the example: I am happy to wait. In some publications, the function of the infinitive is called 'adverb'. In others, it is 'complement of adjective'. Is there a difference in the naming of ...
2
votes
1answer
250 views

The role of infinitive in this sentence

I have a question on this sentence "It is a profitable thing, if one is wise, to seem foolish." -Aeschylus What role does to seem play in this sentence. I think it is an infinitive. But does it ...
0
votes
1answer
30 views

Repeating (or not) “to” after certain verbs

I googled it but I couldn't find the answer... maybe I didn't seek it in the proper way. My question is if "to" must be repeated in sentences such as the following ones: In the past, women ...
0
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1answer
33 views

infinitive usage in complex sentence [duplicate]

which one is correct? An evaluation of the Cronicle interface suggests that Cronicle helped the participants to find data accurately. or An evaluation of the Cronicle interface suggests that ...
3
votes
4answers
5k views

How do I identify “infinitive clauses/phrases” and “subjects”?

In sentences such as the following, there is (as I understand it) an infinitive clause and an infinitive phrase. Which part is the infinitive clause and which part is the infinitive phrase? And what ...
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2answers
134 views

“approach to provide” or “approach to providing”

An energy-efficient approach to provide an optimal solution to this problem. An energy-efficient approach to providing an optimal solution to this problem.