Questions about verbs in their basic (unmarked) forms, such as “be”, “do”, “have”, or “sit”, sometimes introduced by the particle “to” and other times used by itself.

learn more… | top users | synonyms

1
vote
0answers
22 views

Using to + gerund and to + invinitive [duplicate]

"I go to school" Because 'to' is a preposition then is it correct to write "I go to watching the movie"? If not, please explain why. Thank you.
-1
votes
0answers
18 views

modals + have meaning

Here are sentences, could you tell me if they both have the same meaning: I'm sorry I couldn't have come to your party last week. I'm sorry I couldn't come to your party last week.
0
votes
1answer
43 views

Comma before a conjunction that precedes an infinitive phrase?

I understand that a comma is used before "and" when the conjunction precedes an independent clause; however, I'm curious if the same rule applies when it precedes an infinitive phrase: "It was my job ...
0
votes
1answer
36 views

Adverb or adjective when used to describe an infinitive?

"To play basketball" is an infinitive phrase. An infinitive phrase is generally used as a noun. Is the word "professionally" as in "To play basketball professionally..." an adjective or an adverb? Is ...
0
votes
0answers
34 views

What is special about Anglo-French legal usage of [the] infinitive as a noun?

I was reading the etymology of attainder (n.), when I saw its reference to: use of French infinitives as nouns, especially in legal language, see waiver. waiver (n.) [<--] [...] Other ...
0
votes
0answers
19 views

How does one correctly use the 'verb + infinitive' construction?

Which option is correct? I want add something. I want to add something. If there is a general rule, please describe it. If you know how to better name the topic, propose your own version.
3
votes
2answers
174 views

“to require someone to do something” vs “to require that someone do something”

Professor required his students to return their papers typed. vs Professor required that his students return their papers typed. Which of the examples is correct? Do they have ...
2
votes
1answer
100 views

Using a perfect infinitive construction to express uncertainty

My sentence: " I needed for her to have called me." The only example that I can find is from google books- title: The Ghost of Samuel Cetawayo" with a similar use of the perfect infinitive: "I had ...
0
votes
1answer
46 views

Infinitive modifier subject or object or depends on context

I gave her medicine to keep from falling sick. Is this sentence right? Intended meaning is that I have a friend who is not feeling well therefore, I gave her medicine so that she will not be ...
3
votes
3answers
131 views

Why is “to” not appropriate before “be” in this situation?

Consider the following two phrases: It's better to be <X> than <Y>. Why be <X> when you can be <Y>? I recently got in an argument with a friend about if (and why) there ...
5
votes
3answers
3k views

Infinitive without to: The first thing I do is open my eyes

I have not been able to find an explanation for this use of an infinitive without to: The first thing I do in the morning is go to the bathroom. The first thing I do in the morning is open my ...
27
votes
7answers
25k views

Order of “not” with infinitive

This is one thing that keeps bugging me, and maybe there's a direct answer. Grammatically, which one is more correct of these two? Does it make a difference? I tried not to do that. I tried ...
3
votes
4answers
597 views

Why is the verb used without “-s” in this sentence? [duplicate]

In order to help the system make a better guess of the corner locations,... In this sentence, why is "make" not succeeded by "s"? It seems it is needed!
0
votes
2answers
35 views

Using the perfect infinitive in this way?

Is it correct to use the perfect infinitive in this way? "I want it to have been finished by that time" instead of "I want it to be finished by that time". " "I wanted it to have been finished ...
1
vote
2answers
60 views

“We have to be hard on you, you have to be cured”

"We have to be hard on you, you have to be cured," is grammatically correct? Shouldn't it be "We have to be hard on you; you have to be cured," as these are two independent clauses. I've seen it in ...
5
votes
4answers
433 views

Do I have to use the auxiliary before all the verbs?

Which of the following is correct? I will dance and sing at the concert tonight. I will dance and will sing at the concert tonight. Does it happen with to, too? For example: I ...
0
votes
0answers
32 views

[infinitive]How is it to work as a teacher? vs How is to work as a teacher?

How is it to work as a teacher? vs How is to work as a teacher? I think the first sentence has one superfluous word, 'it'. I sure know 'it' refers to 'to work as a teacher?' Why do you use the first ...
1
vote
4answers
3k views

Is there a difference between “way of doing something” and “way to do something”?

Is there a difference between "way of doing something" and "way to do something"? It is on purpose that I did not write "a way of doing something" or "the way of doing something" and "a way to do ...
2
votes
1answer
92 views

What does the perfect infinitive mean?

I came across a sentence recently: Before I turn 40, I want to have written a book. Could someone explain to me what does it actually mean? I'd rather say: Before I turn 40, I want to write a book. ...
1
vote
2answers
66 views

What is the meaning of “ I was only to do that”? [closed]

I am a non-native English learner. Does the sentense "I was only to do that" mean "There was nothing I could do"? Gramatically what is "only" here? Is it an adjective or an adverb to modify " be ...
2
votes
2answers
84 views

About Infinitive

I know that this sentence is correct: "He is not a man to tell a lie." Is it also correct if I say "He is not a man tell a lie." If it's correct what is the difference between these ...
3
votes
3answers
1k views

“For [verb]ing” vs “to [verb]”

Someone edited my message on StackOverflow, but it really bugs me out. I'm not sure what's wrong with it: As you see, the bigger the circle becomes, the more vertices I need for hiding the straight ...
2
votes
2answers
101 views

Why can't I use the word 'to' after the verb 'helped'?

I know it is incorrect to say, "They helped to her" and that it should be, "They helped her", but why is the word "to" not needed? And yet the word to is in this sentence: "They helped to get her ...
0
votes
2answers
68 views

Infinitive usage (which sentence is correct)

I am working on the lyrics for one of my songs and english is not my first language. Here's the question - which of these sentences is correct? No thorns to prick your heart No thorns to prick your ...
2
votes
0answers
45 views

'that' + (pro)noun + infinitive: what grammar is behind such construct? [duplicate]

While reading a technical book, I stumbled upon the following sentence: It is important [that all Java programmers be fully versed in, and comfortable with, the traditional approach]. For me, ...
13
votes
3answers
3k views

“He recommended that they are separated” - is this valid?

I've seen and heard this kind of construction several times now and it always bugs me. When someone recommends something, surely the verb used in the subclause should be infinitive, so: He ...
5
votes
6answers
3k views

Are modal verbs finite or non-finite?

According to Oxford Dictionaries Online, finite ... 2 Grammar (of a verb form) having a specific tense, number, and person. non-finite ... Grammar (of a verb form) not limited by tense, ...
0
votes
0answers
31 views

Q: some of the profits my business earns from the community **BE** returned to the community. (grammar) [duplicate]

I feel it is important that some of the profits my business earns from the community be returned to the community. Why does the author say "be"? I don't understand usage of grammar in this ...
24
votes
4answers
13k views

When should a verb be followed by a gerund instead of an infinitive?

Some verbs are followed by ing, e.g. I enjoy swimming. We can't say I enjoy to swim. Likewise, some verbs are followed by to, e.g. I decided to make a plan. Which particular verbs are followed by ...
0
votes
1answer
95 views

Gerund vs infinitive paraphrase

Is there any difference between these two sentences: "The Democrats tend to increase taxes, discouraging rich people from voting for them" "The Democrats tend to increase taxes, which discourages ...
-1
votes
3answers
2k views

“Feel committed to [gerund/infinitive]”

Does "feel committed to" require an infinitive or gerund complement? For example, which of the following is grammatical? I feel committed to following up on that. I feel committed to follow ...
0
votes
1answer
115 views

What comes first—verb or adverb? [duplicate]

Do you say, to effectively communicate or would you say to communicate effectively. As ENL learner I get this confused quite often. Thanks.
1
vote
1answer
154 views

Infinitive in news headlines

I'm a little bit confused with understanding news titles. I recently started to read news in English willing to improve my language skills, but there is one thing that I totally can't understand (and ...
3
votes
2answers
3k views

How do I identify “infinitive clauses/phrases” and “subjects”?

In sentences such as the following, there is (as I understand it) an infinitive clause and an infinitive phrase. Which part is the infinitive clause and which part is the infinitive phrase? And what ...
4
votes
1answer
155 views

Is there a better term for “perfect infinitive”, “perfect participle” or “perfect gerund”?

BACKGROUND There are grammar terms such as 'present perfect' and 'past perfect' as in: She has learned English for 10 years. [present perfect] She had learned English when she was little. ...
1
vote
1answer
73 views

Infinitive vs. “ing” + past particle [duplicate]

Among the earliest telescopes were Galilean telescopes, modeled after the simple instruments built by Galileo, the first person having used telescopes to study the stars and planets. I know ...
3
votes
4answers
17k views

“Plan to do” vs. “plan on doing”

What are the differences between the following? He is planning to do something. He is planning on doing something. When to use each?
1
vote
2answers
159 views

Ellipsis in “can and have occurred”

The side effects can and have occurred. The omitted verb is an infinitive (occur) but the written verb is a past participle (occurred). Is this sentence grammatically correct and suitable for ...
2
votes
1answer
123 views

Is the second “to” grammatical in “I plan to help build and then to start”?

I wrote this sentence: I plan to help build a strategic vision for Arabic digital content and then to start implementing that vision. I want to produce value-added information in a specific ...
0
votes
2answers
820 views

Do I need to add “to” in every clause in this sentence?

Working in the field helps us to learn how to apply theories to solve real-world problems, to apply […], and to […]. Are the "to" after each comma necessary?
0
votes
1answer
272 views

Clauses of purpose: “for + -ing” or "to-infinitive [duplicate]

In the following sentence, how should the clause of purpose be introduced? In addition to normal maintenance, there are additional costs associated with interventions that may be required to ...
3
votes
1answer
218 views

Split infinitives—did Old English have them?

I've read a few articles as well as questions on this site about splitting infinitives. In the Wikipedia article, it claims: In Old English, infinitives were single words ending in -n or -an ...
0
votes
1answer
44 views

Can infinitives serve as direct objects? [duplicate]

In the sentences Jack wants food and Jack wants to eat, it seems like food and to eat both serve as direct objects of the verb wants. Can a verb in the infinitive serve as a direct object in a ...
-1
votes
2answers
57 views

Word usage of “not to fly” vs “to not fly ” [duplicate]

I often read the phrase "not to" preceding an action, as in "not to run" or "not to swim". It seems awkward. Please explain explain the usage.
0
votes
2answers
81 views

What parents enjoy is playing/play? [closed]

I have a question; is it better to say: What parents enjoy doing is playing with their children. or: What parents enjoy is playing with their children. or: What parents enjoy is play ...
4
votes
1answer
658 views

Why do these verbs take bare infinitives?

[a] It makes the tree grow. [b] I never heard him speak. I’m wondering why causative and sense verbs (make, hear) license bare infinitives for their complement, instead of taking to infinitives? ...
0
votes
0answers
25 views

“Prefer” usage - If the emphasis is on the habit --ing form or to-infinitive? [duplicate]

-ing form : Most people prefer watching a film at the cinema rather than on TV. -to-infinitive form: We prefer to drive during the day whenever we can. Which of the above two sentences ...
1
vote
1answer
101 views

To + verb in sentence without any other verb

From time to time I come across a sentence with to + verb, but with no other verb in it. I see it often in news titles. For example: Squall, Tina and Lightning to appear in Final Fantasy Explorers ...
1
vote
1answer
893 views

“Heard my mom cry/crying”, “leave the door lock/locked”

Two simple examples: a. I heard my mom cry. b. I heard my mom crying. a. Please leave the door lock always. b. Please leave the door locked always. Which one, a or b, is right?
4
votes
8answers
1k views

How to remember the difference between: “Can you try to open” and “Can you try opening”?

I am well aware that a similar question has been asked in the past, namely “Try to save” or “try saving”. However, I am not totally satisfied by the posted answers. My problem is that, every time I ...