Questions about verbs in their basic (unmarked) forms, such as “be”, “do”, “have”, or “sit”, sometimes introduced by the particle “to” and other times used by itself.

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4
votes
1answer
876 views

“Help rule out” vs. “help to rule out” [duplicate]

Duplicate of: What is the correct way to use infinitive after the verb “help”: with or without “to”? “Could help avoid” vs. “could help to avoid” “Helping you do ...
5
votes
1answer
3k views

Is 'I would rather…' without an infinitive immediately following it correct?

Consider: I would rather the walls remain painted in a neutral tint. Is this proper use of 'I would rather..', without an infinitive immediately following it? EDIT This suggests that 'I would ...
6
votes
2answers
441 views

“It is fun to write letters” vs. “It is fun writing letters”

Grammatically, "It is fun to write English letters." is correct. But is the following also grammatically correct? It is fun writing English letters.
3
votes
2answers
14k views

Should we use “not to” or “to not”? [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: Order of “not” with infinitive It's OK to make mistakes; it's not OK not to learn from them. What kind of grammar structure is this? Could I use "to ...
4
votes
3answers
377 views

What causes a verb to be infinitive only?

Why are some verbs only usable in the infinitive? The one example I can think of is "to spite" (see "to wit in the accepted answer). While wiktionary claims that spited is a word, that doesn't match ...
4
votes
3answers
445 views

Usage of consecutive infinitives of purpose

Is it possible to modify an infinitive of purpose with another infinitive of purpose if the action of the first one is not yet carried out? Ex. Jack brought beans home to give to his mother to plant ...
3
votes
2answers
1k views

“Would you have liked to have been” vs. “would you have liked to be”

I was interested in the following sentence which appeared in an article titled “No Rest for the Weary” in The New York Times (February 15, 2008). Would you have liked to have been president from ...
3
votes
7answers
7k views

“Due to” at the beginning of a sentence

I tried to say this: Due to it will have less features than the actual standard system, the performance will be better. Basically, I used a sentence after due to, and one of my English friends ...
1
vote
2answers
191 views

“We do is to complain” or “We complain about it”?

I was just reading a News paper. and found this sentence: Our impatient host could not understand that our security personnel are under so mush pressure in such tense red alert situations. They ...
2
votes
2answers
145 views

Is the expression, “Romney will not to let Obama change the subject” grammatically right?

The article titled, ‘U.S. factors may spare Obama EU allies’ fate’ on Japan Time May 9 issue wraps up with quotes from Mitt Romney and his campaign spokeswoman, Amanda Henneberg; “'The real question ...
3
votes
5answers
318 views

Is it grammatical to have “why” and “to” together?

Is the following sentence grammatical? Why to use page-level permissions From Google Support: Why to use page-level permissions Page-level permissions allow you to.. It sounds ...
1
vote
4answers
443 views

Is “go on +verb root” grammatically right?

I came across the line, "he went on explain (a metaphor) in the clip," at the end of the following sentence of the article, "How to insult your political opponents" appearing in New Yorker magazine ...
0
votes
2answers
120 views

“To know X is all I need” vs. “knowing X is all I need” [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: How does one know when to use a gerund or a infinitive? Which of the following is the correct form? To know you're interested in my book is all I need to go on ...
5
votes
6answers
797 views

Why are present participle and infinitive equally acceptable for some verbs, but not others

This question about "started teaching/to teach" made me realise that even though the present participle and infinitive are both acceptable after "started", that's not the case with other superficially ...
2
votes
2answers
11k views

Expect +to VS expect + ing

I know that expect is used this way: I expect you to do that. But I have also seen examples like with verb in its "ing" form: > What to expect working at... > I will expect you doing ...
6
votes
2answers
9k views

“Stop working” vs “stopped to work”

I want to know, is there any difference between "stop + v.(ing)" and "stopped to + v.". These are example sentences. I stop working for a month. vs I stopped to work for a month. I stop watching ...
5
votes
2answers
5k views

'To' vs 'in order to' in negative clauses

The answers to this related question suggest that to and in order to are pretty much interchangeable, the former being preferred in informal contexts. My question is about negative clauses. ...
1
vote
2answers
557 views

Why do we use “to” after “how”? [closed]

For example: How to makes this? Why do I use the to after how?
2
votes
6answers
617 views

“I have no story to be told” or “I have no story to tell”?

The former one is what I heard in Adele's song Rolling in the Deep, is this a common usage? Or is it just for rhyme? update: to make my question more specific: Is the former one grammatically ...
2
votes
1answer
755 views

Grammatically correct form of “Way <infinitive phrase>”

There's a reasonably common idiomatic phrasing in the form "Way <infinitive phrase>!" that denotatively means "You did a good job of <whatever>", but is almost always used ironically. ...
2
votes
2answers
3k views

Grammatical complements for “allow”

Are any of these verb phrases grammatical? allows the user of modeling and resolving allows the user to model and resolve Which version of the following sentence is correct/better? ...
0
votes
1answer
802 views

Which of the following sentences is/are incorrect? (“Permit” vs. “allow” vs. “let”)

Which of the following sentences is/are incorrect? Why? The visa permits you to study for two months. My father would never allow me to study English Let me to go. You're hurting me. This is ...
4
votes
4answers
39k views

“Started to work” vs “Started working”

What is the difference between the following: Things started to work again. Things started working again.
5
votes
1answer
436 views

Why was _to_ verb_+ing_ used in this case? [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: How to use “to + V-ing”? “To hear” or “to hearing”? Samson had been a strong man prior to having his hair cut. From a grammatical point of view, when ...
3
votes
2answers
1k views

“I am starting learning xyz”

Is this sentence correct? I am starting learning xyz.
2
votes
3answers
10k views

Determining main verb of a sentence which match with subject + verb + to + verb pattern

If I have sentences Member is allowed to change himself back I want to go to school He needs to stop What are the predicate of these sentences? Are they allowed - want - need, or ...
1
vote
2answers
161 views

Is this usage of “know to be” correct — “They want to eat food they know to be good for them”?

In the following sentence, is the construction know + to + infinitive grammatical? They want to eat food they know to be good for them. The dictionary says that "know to do something" is a ...
5
votes
3answers
282 views

'Should've seen it glow' or 'should've seen it glowing'?

Which one of the following is the correct one? I should have seen it glow. I should have seen it glowing. Or are both correct? Would you parse them please?
4
votes
2answers
579 views

Infinitive form in reported commands

I know that "I tried not to do that" and "I tried to not do that" are both valid sentences grammatically speaking. But can the second construction be applied to reported commands? Is it correct to ...
1
vote
6answers
278 views

“Plan not to retire” or “Plan to not retire”? [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: Order of “not” with infinitive Someone edited my post on another StackExchange.com site to change the former to the latter. Which is better? I wrote the ...
2
votes
0answers
106 views

“Helping you do something” or “Helping you to do something”? [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: What is the correct way to use infinitive after the verb “help”: with or without “to”? In the phrase "Helping you to master Russian", is it ...
2
votes
3answers
579 views

“To do this or do that” or “to do this or *to* do that”?

I saw on the bottom of an email: To change your email preferences or unsubscribe from certain messages, click here. Is that correct or should it be: To change your email preferences or to ...
4
votes
3answers
2k views

How to understand “It takes a little bit of getting used to the idea…”?

The following sentence is from a mathematical lecture note here: It takes a little bit of getting used to the idea of a function that cannot actually be evaluated at any specific point, but with ...
2
votes
1answer
103 views

“For IE (to) render them”

Which sentence is correct? I just put &nbsp; in the empty elements for IE to render them. I just put &nbsp; in the empty elements for IE render them. The render will be processed ...
0
votes
2answers
608 views

Do I need to add “to” in every clause in a this sentence?

Working in the field helps us to learn how to apply theories to solve real-world problems, to apply […], and to […]. Are the "to" after each comma necessary?
1
vote
0answers
117 views

“Try not to” vs “try to not” [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: Order of “not” with infinitive When negating verbs that are commonly followed by the infinitive, is there a difference in meaning between placing the "not" ...
8
votes
3answers
449 views

Is it appropriate to omit “to” after “ought”?

Is it appropriate to omit to after ought? I ought to be disciplined for my insolence. Vs. I ought be disciplined for my insolence. Is it okay to omit the to?
8
votes
0answers
408 views

Infinitive without “to”? [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: What is the correct way to use infinitive after the verb “help”: with or without “to”? Today I found this headline on bbc.co.uk How one ...
3
votes
2answers
350 views

“To handle certificates is…” vs. “handling certificates is…”

I have two equivalent sentences, intended for a brochure for a computer program. Which one is better? To handle certificates manually is time consuming and expensive. Handling certificates ...
7
votes
2answers
1k views

Consecutive infinitives

Is there a rule governing when it is acceptable to position two infinitives in a row? E.g.: The witness plans to refuse to testify.
13
votes
3answers
2k views

“He recommended that they are separated” - is this valid?

I've seen and heard this kind of construction several times now and it always bugs me. When someone recommends something, surely the verb used in the subclause should be infinitive, so: He ...
4
votes
3answers
356 views

'To swiftly go' or 'to go swiftly'? [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: Are split infinitives grammatically incorrect, or are they valid constructs? One of my friends once told me 'to go' is considered a whole word and no word should be put ...
-2
votes
3answers
301 views

“The aims are promoting and protecting” vs. “the aims are to promote and protect”

Which of the following two constructions is correct? and why? Some of the important aims of the UNO are to promote peace and protect human rights. Some of the important aims of the UNO are ...
11
votes
2answers
63k views

How to use “to + V-ing”?

I saw some scenarios that used the structure "to + V-ing", such as the following: Looking forward to hearing. Disposed to using few words. I would like to apply what I learned in school to helping ...
2
votes
2answers
525 views

'to'-infinitive without the verb

I seem to recall reading somewhere that using a to-infinitive with the actual verb omitted (because it's clear from context) — as in He asked me to go, but I don't want to. (1) — is ...
7
votes
3answers
5k views

Infinitives with “ought not”

Most of the references I can find about the word “ought” indicate that even when negating it, you should use an infinitive: “You ought not to go there.” That sounds quite bad ...
9
votes
3answers
4k views

“Important that John bring/brings” [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: When should I use the subjunctive mood? Given the sentence John brings his lunch to school, is it correct to say It is important that John brings his lunch to ...
1
vote
1answer
879 views

“Heard my mom cry/crying”, “leave the door lock/locked”

Two simple examples: a. I heard my mom cry. b. I heard my mom crying. a. Please leave the door lock always. b. Please leave the door locked always. Which one, a or b, is right?
1
vote
0answers
98 views

Is it correct to say “John helps you talk with people”? [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: What is the correct way to use infinitive after the verb "help": with or without "to"? Sorry if this is a stupid question, but English is not my first language. For me ...
6
votes
1answer
3k views

“I love to [verb]” vs “I love [gerund]” [duplicate]

Possible Duplicates: Catenatives followed by infinitives and gerunds “I like to do (be) something” vs “I like doing (being) something” What is the difference between "I love to sing" and ...