Questions about verbs in their basic (unmarked) forms, such as “be”, “do”, “have”, or “sit”, sometimes introduced by the particle “to” and other times used by itself.

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5answers
357 views

Is it “to be left free to do something” or “to be let free to do something”?

I know "to leave someone alone" and "to let someone be on their own". What happens when the adjective is followed by a verb (in the infinitive)? Is it "*Leave me free to do whatever I want." / "*I ...
1
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2answers
245 views

Why do 'get' and 'have' work similarly in 'get/have sth done" but differently in 'get sb to do sth' and 'have sb do sth'

Why do 'get' and 'have' work similarly in I got/had my car repaired. but differently – that is are not complemented in the same way although they still mean the same – in I got someone to ...
0
votes
3answers
854 views

“Required to do” vs. “required doing”

Your employer is required to deduct a certain amount from your salary as a withstanding tax payable to the federal government. 'Hamlet' is required reading [= must be read] for this course. ...
4
votes
2answers
159 views

Infinitive Clause For “Curious”

I need some help about the infinitive clause that comes after "curious". Let's say that I am "curious" about a locked room. Then, could I write this: I am curious to open the door. I ...
4
votes
1answer
535 views

Why do these verbs take bare infinitives?

[a] It makes the tree grow. [b] I never heard him speak. I’m wondering why causative and sense verbs (make, hear) license bare infinitives for their complement, instead of taking to infinitives? ...
-3
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1answer
588 views

to be p.p. or being p.p.?AND WHY? [closed]

Would you kindly tell me the difference between the following? She likes to be looked at. She likes being looked at.
1
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1answer
241 views

something is capable of to be p.p. or being p.p.? [closed]

Manual: small, helpful book capable of being carried in the hand. What is the difference between to be carried and being carried in this sentence?
0
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1answer
411 views

Usage of “but” as preposition

About usage of "but", I am confused with this sentence: You have no choice but to perform the back-test yourself. "But" is the preposition in this sentence. Why is the use of infinitive? Can I ...
0
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2answers
113 views

fun to make and fun to eat

“These cookies are fun to make and especially fun to eat.” (source) Semantically, these cookies is both to-infinitves’ object; and to-infinitves seems to be the semantic subject of both funs, ...
0
votes
1answer
1k views

Provide to somebody to do/doing or Provide for somebody to do/doing?

I'm writing a letter to my teacher to thank her for letting me put on a party, but I'm confused by these: I would like to thank somebody for your support, guidance and encouragement, and for the ...
0
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2answers
86 views

What is the second “to” in “to take this opportunity to foreground poetry”?

That’s why it’s particularly appropriate for us to take this opportunity to foreground poetry as an aural experience. — Source Is this "to" the same as "something to say?" P.S.: Isn't ...
5
votes
3answers
3k views

Infinitive without to: The first thing I do is open my eyes

I have not been able to find an explanation for this use of an infinitive without to: The first thing I do in the morning is go to the bathroom. The first thing I do in the morning is open my ...
1
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1answer
695 views

to be certain to do something versus to be certain of doing something

"Paul is certain to win the race." "Paul is certain of winning the race." What is the difference between these two sentences?
1
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1answer
745 views

What is the difference between “so to do” and “to do so”

I believe that both are correct. I.e. I have got the Christmas Eve off this year but my partner has failed so to do. is equivalent to I have got the Christmas Eve off this year but my ...
1
vote
1answer
718 views

Is 'thought it to be' grammatically correct?

Does If man continues to scathe all of Earth and its seas, then this isn’t the world I thought it to be make sense? Or should I just replace the 'to' with 'would'?
1
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1answer
911 views

“Recommend to have” vs. “recommend having” [duplicate]

I am writing my bachelor dissertation and several times Microsoft Word has corrected me from "to have" to "having". One of the sentences, for instance, goes like this: The author recommends to ...
1
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2answers
103 views

What is the function of this “to” here?

Old people did not know enough once, perchance, to fetch fresh fuel to keep the fire a-going; new people put a little dry wood under a pot, and are whirled round the globe with the speed of birds, ...
-1
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1answer
598 views

“Needs to be repaired” vs. “needs repairing” [duplicate]

Is there any difference in meaning between the following two sentences? My car needs to be repaired. My car needs reparing.
0
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1answer
364 views

verbs not followed by that clauses

Where can I find a list of verbs like 'to want', which must be followed by an infinitive (other verbs by a gerund), but cannot be followed by a that-clause? I got from your website that there are ...
-1
votes
1answer
67 views

To repair bicycle is his job. Vs. Repairing bicycle is his job

My question is what the differences are between the two sentences. In what situation do you use infinitive as a subject? And when do you use gerund as a subjective? Thanks a lot!
0
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1answer
736 views

“Needs repairing” vs. “needs to be repaired” [duplicate]

Do the following two sentences mean the same thing? If so, which is more commonly used? My car needs repairing. My car needs to be repaired.
2
votes
1answer
103 views

Is the second “to” grammatical in “I plan to help build and then to start”?

I wrote this sentence: I plan to help build a strategic vision for Arabic digital content and then to start implementing that vision. I want to produce value-added information in a specific ...
6
votes
4answers
687 views

Usage of “to find (noun) (adj)”

I am a native speaker of German, and I often see the English verb find being used like its German cognate finden. For example: My students and I find your platform very useful and very appealing ...
1
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2answers
1k views

“… need XXX-ing” vs. “… need to be XXX-ed” [duplicate]

What is the difference between these two expressions? Your hair needs brushing. Your hair needs to be brushed.
1
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4answers
107 views

Which object is modified by the infinitive in this sentence?

The sentence is like this: Governments must ensure that their major cities receive the financial support they need in order to thrive. I'm not sure about the to thrive. Does this sentence ...
2
votes
2answers
218 views

Reflexive pronouns and understood “to be”

So, I've got a fairly straightforward sentence: Poe did not think himself a writer of inferior material. It is my understanding that "a writer of inferior material" is the object of the ...
1
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2answers
133 views

“Known not to …” or “Known to not …”

Which one of the following word orders is correct: This program is known not to work correctly. or This program is known to not work correctly.
2
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2answers
7k views

“Suggest to go” vs. “suggest going”

I took an English assessment test online and this was my answer: Someone suggested to go for a walk. My answer was wrong and this was the correct sentence: Someone suggested going for a ...
5
votes
2answers
624 views

Omitting the last “to” in “All {I need to / have to / must} do is (to?) do something” [duplicate]

I remember I learned a structure like the one that this post’s title mentions: All I {need to do | have to do | must do} is do something. But is it correct to use "to do something" after the ...
1
vote
2answers
707 views

Noun+ infinitive + verb structure [closed]

In my grammar book I've got a sentence The woman to talk to is over there and this is the only example. That makes me believe I can say things like: -The packages to deal with will arrive tomorrow ...
-1
votes
1answer
276 views

“Looking to + infinitive” vs “Looking to + gerund” [closed]

Which is the correct expression, looking to build or looking to building? Whether you are looking to build. . . . or Whether you are looking to building. . . .
3
votes
1answer
2k views

perfect infinitives with main verbs

My question is about usage of perfect infinitives with main verbs e.g. I would like to have lived in the 13th century. She was going to have worked in her mother's business, but decided ...
2
votes
1answer
1k views

How can I identify the role of an infinitive in a sentence?

Infinitives may function as nouns, adjectives or adverbs. Since infinitives are derived from verbs, they do express actions or states of being. However, there is some difficulty in identifying the ...
2
votes
1answer
1k views

“To see” vs “seeing” [duplicate]

Which of the following is grammatical? To see my stuff at your grocery is a great source of pride! Seeing my stuff at your grocery is a great source of pride! The verb "to see" is ...
1
vote
1answer
387 views

“Committed to build” vs. “committed to building”

If this were a mere tagline, not a complete sentence in a full paragraph, which would be more correct? Committed to build a better world Committed to building a better world
0
votes
1answer
88 views

Using an infinitive [duplicate]

"It is imperative that he writes a letter to his sister as soon as possible." In this case, is the correct form write? If so, why?
3
votes
8answers
987 views

How to remember the difference between: “Can you try to open” and “Can you try opening”?

I am well aware that a similar question has been asked in the past, namely “Try to save” or “try saving”. However, I am not totally satisfied by the posted answers. My problem is that, every time I ...
0
votes
1answer
520 views

“Developed to [infinitive]” vs. “developed for [gerund]” [duplicate]

I am confused about when to use "to verb" and when to use "for verb+ing" constructs. For example what would be the proper construct for the following sentences extracted from scientific journals: ...
1
vote
2answers
525 views

“Important for someone to do” vs. “important that someone does”

As I know, there is no difference in meaning between the following two sentences. It is not important for you to eat good food. It is not important that you eat good food. But I believe ...
2
votes
3answers
9k views

“Plan to do” vs. “plan on doing”

What are the differences between the following? He is planning to do something. He is planning on doing something. When to use each?
4
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5answers
2k views

Are modal verbs finite or non-finite?

According to Oxford Dictionaries Online, finite ... 2 Grammar (of a verb form) having a specific tense, number, and person. non-finite ... Grammar (of a verb form) not limited by tense, ...
2
votes
1answer
289 views

Apart from + infinitive

A piece of news from the BBC reads as follows [emphasis in the original]: The UN has said very little on the matter, apart from to insist it is immune from legal proceedings. Now, I knew that ...
8
votes
2answers
2k views

Dare + have done

Here is an example from an old book. I know it’s old but it can’t be simply discarded, I hope. "I never dare have spoken — never dare have told you that my love for you was killing me" So, I ...
2
votes
1answer
101 views

“A tool to do” vs. “a tool that does” vs. “a tool for doing”

I'm the curator of the Open Web Platform Daily Digest link. In the "Tools" section of each daily I write entries in this format: tool_name, tool_description For example: hapi, a server framework ...
0
votes
2answers
561 views

“Committed to supporting X” vs. “committed to support X” [duplicate]

I'm trying to edit a speech and found a commonly used phase which I'm not sure if I should amend it or not. The sentence goes like this: [a subject] is committed to supporting [a project]. ...
0
votes
2answers
200 views

“I would like to go to a youth center to help and (to) work with teenagers”

Which is correct? I would like to go to a youth center to help and work with teenagers. I would like to go to a youth center to help and to work with teenagers. The question is whether ...
1
vote
3answers
208 views

What kind of infinitive is it in “to come home to be killed”?

In this example: Agamemnon comes home to be killed by his wife and her lover. We are quite sure that he didn't plan on dying, so comes home to be killed is not the “infinitive of purpose”. What ...
2
votes
5answers
501 views

“stop to do something” vs. “continue to do something”

A transcript of a recent speech by Barack Obama contains the following sentence: Boston police, firefighters, and first responders as well as the National Guard responded heroically, and continue ...
2
votes
2answers
497 views

Can object complements make any difference to sentences?

I'm reading a grammar book, and I have some questions. A. We ate the fish raw. I want Sue drunk. I prefer the music soft. I like coffee black. We drank the beer cold. This type of ...
3
votes
3answers
304 views

Is “to practice volleyball requires stamina” grammatical?

Is the sentence "to practice volleyball requires stamina" grammatically correct? As opposed to the sentence "practicing volleyball requires stamina"? Another example: To ensure safety ...