3
votes
2answers
102 views

Do the -ing and to-infinitive “verbs” that follow catenative verbs always take the grammatical function of “noun”?

I'm wondering whether or not the verb form that follows a catenative verb has the grammatical function of a noun or of a verb, and whether or not it depends on the first catenative verb. "I like to ...
2
votes
1answer
55 views

Is it grammatical to say of some potential meaning that it is “able to be said” or “trying to be said”?

A recent commenter on a recent word-search question nominated a term as “an even better word for what is trying to be said.” This seems to me to attribute intention to something—a ...
1
vote
3answers
133 views

Is the “sorry to [infinitive] ” structure always grammatical?

I'm sorry to be so late. I'm sorry to hear about your sick mother. I'm sorry to waste your time. I'm sorry to make you feel so sad. I'm sorry to frighten you. I'm sorry to disagree ...
1
vote
1answer
75 views

Should I factor-out “to” in a series of infinitives?

Which of the following two forms of the sentence is better? "Managers can use these findings to bound estimates, to assess the realism of road maps, to recognise unsustainable growth, to judge the ...
1
vote
1answer
90 views

Is the second “to” grammatical in “I plan to help build and then to start”?

I wrote this sentence: I plan to help build a strategic vision for Arabic digital content and then to start implementing that vision. I want to produce value-added information in a specific ...
6
votes
4answers
543 views

Usage of “to find (noun) (adj)”

I am a native speaker of German, and I often see the English verb find being used like its German cognate finden. For example: My students and I find your platform very useful and very appealing ...
2
votes
2answers
3k views

“Suggest to go” vs. “suggest going”

I took an English assessment test online and this was my answer: Someone suggested to go for a walk. My answer was wrong and this was the correct sentence: Someone suggested going for a ...
5
votes
2answers
393 views

Omitting the last “to” in “All {I need to / have to / must} do is (to?) do something” [duplicate]

I remember I learned a structure like the one that this post’s title mentions: All I {need to do | have to do | must do} is do something. But is it correct to use "to do something" after the ...
2
votes
1answer
908 views

“To see” vs “seeing” [duplicate]

Which of the following is grammatical? To see my stuff at your grocery is a great source of pride! Seeing my stuff at your grocery is a great source of pride! The verb "to see" is ...
1
vote
1answer
244 views

“Committed to build” vs. “committed to building”

If this were a mere tagline, not a complete sentence in a full paragraph, which would be more correct? Committed to build a better world Committed to building a better world
1
vote
1answer
81 views

“A tool to do” vs. “a tool that does” vs. “a tool for doing”

I'm the curator of the Open Web Platform Daily Digest link. In the "Tools" section of each daily I write entries in this format: tool_name, tool_description For example: hapi, a server framework ...
0
votes
2answers
380 views

“Committed to supporting X” vs. “committed to support X” [duplicate]

I'm trying to edit a speech and found a commonly used phase which I'm not sure if I should amend it or not. The sentence goes like this: [a subject] is committed to supporting [a project]. ...
0
votes
2answers
182 views

“I would like to go to a youth center to help and (to) work with teenagers”

Which is correct? I would like to go to a youth center to help and work with teenagers. I would like to go to a youth center to help and to work with teenagers. The question is whether ...
1
vote
2answers
409 views

Can object complements make any difference to sentences?

I'm reading a grammar book, and I have some questions. A. We ate the fish raw. I want Sue drunk. I prefer the music soft. I like coffee black. We drank the beer cold. This type of ...
3
votes
3answers
276 views

Is “to practice volleyball requires stamina” grammatical?

Is the sentence "to practice volleyball requires stamina" grammatically correct? As opposed to the sentence "practicing volleyball requires stamina"? Another example: To ensure safety ...
-1
votes
1answer
606 views

“Had decided to call” vs.“had decided that we should call”

I have a question regarding using "had decided". I'm not sure if I can use either an infinitive form of a verb or a modal verb: We had decided to call each other when we are in danger. We had ...
-2
votes
1answer
65 views

“Some things will be known, but others will not”, or “… will not be”?

Which is the correct sentence? Some things will be known, but others will not. Some things will be known, but others will not be.
-1
votes
2answers
351 views

“I am full to die.” — Is this sentence correct? [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: “I am angry to die” or “I am angry to death” I am full to die. I meant to say, "I might die because I am full." Is this a correct expression?
-1
votes
2answers
5k views

Is it “What should he have done?” or “had he done”?

What should he have done? What should he had done? Could you tell me which one is correct? (If any.)
0
votes
1answer
641 views

“Enables you to quickly and easily identify” vs. “enables you to identify quickly and easily” [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: Are split infinitives grammatically incorrect, or are they valid constructs? I'm currently having a bit of a dispute and would appreciate your help please. Which one is ...
-1
votes
2answers
816 views

“Feel committed to [gerund/infinitive]”

Does "feel committed to" require an infinitive or gerund complement? For example, which of the following is grammatical? I feel committed to following up on that. I feel committed to follow ...
1
vote
1answer
661 views

“Heard me [infinitive]” vs. “heard me [present participle]”

"Heard me [infinitive]" vs. "heard me [present participle]" At that time, you wouldn't have heard me talk about it. At that time, you wouldn't have heard me talking about it. At ...
4
votes
5answers
1k views

“How best to handle” vs. “how to best handle”

Are there rules on the placement of 'best'? They are deciding how to best handle the matter. They are deciding how best to handle the matter. Is one of them wrong?
6
votes
1answer
213 views

Do I need a “to” for a second infinitive in a sentence?

It was common practice to first test and execute a program's source code by hand before using a computer. It was common practice to first test and to execute a program's source code by hand ...
2
votes
1answer
66 views

“To be” or just “be”

Which of these two are more correct? 1) When clicking the Edit customer button, I would expect the changes be transferred to the edit view. or 2) When clicking the Edit customer button, I ...
5
votes
2answers
156 views

Should “portray” be paired with “to be”?

Is it acceptable to pair "portray" with "to be"? As in The novel portrays life to be a... Would it be better to use as?
1
vote
3answers
2k views

“He has to do it. Hasn't he (to)?”

He has to do it. Hasn't he (to)? Is the 'to' correct/ incorrect/ unnecessary? Is that a case of an infinitive in interrogative tail (question tag)?
1
vote
3answers
533 views

“thanks to (command)”

A friend who works in business says that she has been hearing a lot of polite commands worded as e.g. "thanks to ask any questions at the end of the presentation" (she has also seen this written a few ...
1
vote
2answers
1k views

“Ambitious to [infinitive]” vs. “ambitious about [gerund]”

What is the correct preposition to use with ambitious? I am ambitious to achieve success. I am ambitious about achieving success.
3
votes
3answers
1k views

Which of these sentences is correctly written?

Someone edited my message on StackOverflow, but it really bugs me out. I'm not sure what's wrong with it: As you see, the bigger the circle becomes, the more vertices I need for hiding the straight ...
4
votes
1answer
666 views

“Help rule out” vs. “help to rule out” [duplicate]

Duplicate of: What is the correct way to use infinitive after the verb “help”: with or without “to”? “Could help avoid” vs. “could help to avoid” “Helping you do ...
6
votes
2answers
398 views

“It is fun to write letters” vs. “It is fun writing letters”

Grammatically, "It is fun to write English letters." is correct. But is the following also grammatically correct? It is fun writing English letters.
3
votes
2answers
1k views

“Would you have liked to have been” vs. “would you have liked to be”

I was interested in the following sentence which appeared in an article titled “No Rest for the Weary” in The New York Times (February 15, 2008). Would you have liked to have been president from ...
2
votes
6answers
5k views

“Due to” at the beginning of a sentence

I tried to say this: Due to it will have less features than the actual standard system, the performance will be better. Basically, I used a sentence after due to, and one of my English friends ...
1
vote
2answers
186 views

“We do is to complain” or “We complain about it”?

I was just reading a News paper. and found this sentence: Our impatient host could not understand that our security personnel are under so mush pressure in such tense red alert situations. They ...
2
votes
2answers
142 views

Is the expression, “Romney will not to let Obama change the subject” grammatically right?

The article titled, ‘U.S. factors may spare Obama EU allies’ fate’ on Japan Time May 9 issue wraps up with quotes from Mitt Romney and his campaign spokeswoman, Amanda Henneberg; “'The real question ...
3
votes
5answers
310 views

Is it grammatical to have “why” and “to” together?

Is the following sentence grammatical? Why to use page-level permissions From Google Support: Why to use page-level permissions Page-level permissions allow you to.. It sounds ...
1
vote
4answers
420 views

Is “go on +verb root” grammatically right?

I came across the line, "he went on explain (a metaphor) in the clip," at the end of the following sentence of the article, "How to insult your political opponents" appearing in New Yorker magazine ...
0
votes
2answers
115 views

“To know X is all I need” vs. “knowing X is all I need” [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: How does one know when to use a gerund or a infinitive? Which of the following is the correct form? To know you're interested in my book is all I need to go on ...
5
votes
2answers
4k views

'To' vs 'in order to' in negative clauses

The answers to this related question suggest that to and in order to are pretty much interchangeable, the former being preferred in informal contexts. My question is about negative clauses. ...
1
vote
2answers
533 views

Why do we use “to” after “how”? [closed]

For example: How to makes this? Why do I use the to after how?
2
votes
6answers
541 views

“I have no story to be told” or “I have no story to tell”?

The former one is what I heard in Adele's song Rolling in the Deep, is this a common usage? Or is it just for rhyme? update: to make my question more specific: Is the former one grammatically ...
2
votes
2answers
2k views

Grammatical complements for “allow”

Are any of these verb phrases grammatical? allows the user of modeling and resolving allows the user to model and resolve Which version of the following sentence is correct/better? ...
0
votes
1answer
715 views

Which of the following sentences is/are incorrect? (“Permit” vs. “allow” vs. “let”)

Which of the following sentences is/are incorrect? Why? The visa permits you to study for two months. My father would never allow me to study English Let me to go. You're hurting me. This is ...
5
votes
1answer
388 views

Why was _to_ verb_+ing_ used in this case? [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: How to use “to + V-ing”? “To hear” or “to hearing”? Samson had been a strong man prior to having his hair cut. From a grammatical point of view, when ...
3
votes
2answers
1k views

“I am starting learning xyz”

Is this sentence correct? I am starting learning xyz.
1
vote
2answers
158 views

Is this usage of “know to be” correct — “They want to eat food they know to be good for them”?

In the following sentence, is the construction know + to + infinitive grammatical? They want to eat food they know to be good for them. The dictionary says that "know to do something" is a ...
5
votes
3answers
269 views

'Should've seen it glow' or 'should've seen it glowing'?

Which one of the following is the correct one? I should have seen it glow. I should have seen it glowing. Or are both correct? Would you parse them please?
4
votes
2answers
504 views

Infinitive form in reported commands

I know that "I tried not to do that" and "I tried to not do that" are both valid sentences grammatically speaking. But can the second construction be applied to reported commands? Is it correct to ...
1
vote
3answers
1k views

How to understand “It takes a little bit of getting used to the idea…”?

The following sentence is from a mathematical lecture note here: It takes a little bit of getting used to the idea of a function that cannot actually be evaluated at any specific point, but with ...