Questions about verbs in their basic (unmarked) forms, such as “be”, “do”, “have”, or “sit”, sometimes introduced by the particle “to” and other times used by itself.

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2answers
51 views

Why must the infinitive be used after “I am qualified to”?

I am not able to understand why the infinitive must be used after "I am qualified to". For example I am qualified to teach. Does not to play the role of preposition in this sentence? If the ...
-1
votes
2answers
30 views

going + ing vs going + infinitive, when use which?

In the middle of a conversation I should use which of the follow sentences: Tomorrow, I'm going climbing. or Tomorrow, I'm going to climb. I did a deep search and I found these similar ...
1
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1answer
61 views

“I hope I enjoy myself very much” is this correct?

I hope I enjoy myself very much I came across the above expression when I was reading something, the writer wasn't a native English speaker. She was talking about visiting a place she wanted to ...
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votes
1answer
27 views

Do “it is time for someone to do something” and “it is time someone did something” mean the same thing?

I know that It is time (understood: for the speaker or for a group of people including the speaker) to do something. and It is time I or we did something. do not mean the same thing: the first is ...
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votes
1answer
35 views

“glad to receive something” or “glad to have received something”? [closed]

which is correct? "I am glad to receive your letter." or "I am glad to have received your letter." The intent is to talk about a specific letter recently received in the past.
1
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3answers
76 views

Trouble with translating a sentence [closed]

I am not a native English speaker, so I am not sure I understand the bolded sentence correctly: The anti-hero is actually the main character in some contemporary works of literature. Guy Montag in ...
0
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2answers
50 views

'decide not to' or 'decide to not' ? [duplicate]

I came up with this question when I received an email from a committee with a sentence 'We have decided not to publish it', which seems really strange to me because the grammar I learned in English ...
1
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0answers
38 views

What are the grammatical phrases in this sentence?

I'm analyzing this sentence and scanning it for prepositional, appositive and verbal phrases. In the sentence so far as I can tell there is only one prepositional and no appositive and no verbals ...
0
votes
1answer
75 views

Usage of “to find out” [closed]

Your father climbed to some rough rocks near the coast to find out that under the rocks, our friend Lake lies severely wounded. Is this usage of "to find something by chance (as a result of ...
0
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0answers
41 views

I don't like [you to go there] [duplicate]

I don’t like you going there. I don’t like you to go there. Like can take both -ing and a to-infinitive as complement. But can the expression that the matrix subject and the subject of ...
2
votes
1answer
55 views

What's to do? vs. What's to be done?

In order to ask What should be done? or What should we do? using an infinitival clause, you can readily say What's to be done? or What to do?. (1) What's to do? But I've heard (1) used in the ...
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votes
2answers
55 views

The meeting IS TO take place at 10 pm [closed]

The meeting is to take place at 10 pm Should "Is to" be mean here as "have to" or "going to"? Another example: Those of you, who sign up are to be commended. This kind of sentences confusing me a ...
0
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1answer
93 views

What’s the difference between “to VERB” and “to be VERBed”?

What is the difference between these two statements: A new version of Java is ready to install. A new version of Java is ready to be installed.
4
votes
1answer
60 views

Are both of these Raising’s?

[i] Equi Billᵢ wants [[(for) Billᵢ] to leave at noon] [Billᵢ wants [ __ ᵢ to leave at noon]] [ii] Raising [[(For) the casserole] to be done] seems The casserole seems [to be done] ...
1
vote
1answer
38 views

Pres. perfect + going to + past infinitive

I have seen the following sentence: For four months now John has been going to have finished his novel by today. I hope I understand it (I assume it says that he has been trying to finish his ...
1
vote
3answers
66 views

“It takes” + infinitive vs. present participle

Is it grammatically correct to say "It took me five hours travelling to the US"? Most people would say "It took me five hours to travel to the US." I wonder if the infinitive is always the only ...
3
votes
5answers
100 views

“It is to be discussed”, what is the infinitive doing in this sentence?

It is to be discussed. Is be + infinitive forming the future tense here? You are to be dressed and ready by 8:00. I was thinking it's almost commanding (or speaking of a command) but this ...
3
votes
2answers
178 views

Do the -ing and to-infinitive “verbs” that follow catenative verbs always take the grammatical function of “noun”?

I'm wondering whether or not the verb form that follows a catenative verb has the grammatical function of a noun or of a verb, and whether or not it depends on the first catenative verb. "I like to ...
2
votes
1answer
51 views

A question about “to becoming” [duplicate]

Would this sentence be correct? Being scared is the first step to becoming free. The more I look at it, the less clear it becomes.
2
votes
1answer
77 views

Is it grammatical to say of some potential meaning that it is “able to be said” or “trying to be said”?

A recent commenter on a recent word-search question nominated a term as “an even better word for what is trying to be said.” This seems to me to attribute intention to something—a ...
0
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0answers
28 views

What part of speech is “to” when attached to an infintive? [duplicate]

For example, in "to see", what part of speech is "to"?
1
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1answer
87 views

“I let him do it” and “I allow him to do it”, why exactly does one require 'to'?

I let him do it. and I allow him to do it. Why does the latter require to? What are the "rules" of using to with an infinitive? When is it necessary?
1
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1answer
74 views

negative infinitive: 'not to do something' versus 'to not do something'

Found in the Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English under the entry 'to skip something': [transitive] not do something informal to not do something that you usually do or that you should do ...
0
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2answers
226 views

active voice and passive voice in the infinitive construction

Here are two sentences: That is an interesting question to answer. It is an easy sentence to translate. I am very confused about why we should use the active voice rather than the passive ...
0
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3answers
98 views

Can “may” be an infinitive

I was reading this article http://www.organics.org/8-beers-that-you-should-stop-drinking-immediately/ when I saw Propylene Glycol is controversial, and is said to may be potentially harmful to ...
4
votes
1answer
86 views

subject + verb + infinitive

I am having difficulty with subject + verb + infinitive set-ups, as I discovered with who/whom sentences. I understand who and whom as the subject and object forms. For sentences that I find a little ...
2
votes
2answers
196 views

what's the meaning when “be” is followed by an infinitive

"If two Weeping Angels were to look at each other at the same time, they would be trapped in stone form until an outside force moves them apart." My questions are about the phrase "were to look": ...
2
votes
1answer
62 views

How do you explain usage of infinitive in “to hear all these large words, you would think…”?

I stumbled upon this quotation from Thomas Huxley: You have all heard it repeated, I dare say, that men of science work by means of induction and deduction, and that by the help of these ...
1
vote
3answers
170 views

Is the “sorry to [infinitive] ” structure always grammatical?

I'm sorry to be so late. I'm sorry to hear about your sick mother. I'm sorry to waste your time. I'm sorry to make you feel so sad. I'm sorry to frighten you. I'm sorry to disagree ...
3
votes
2answers
64 views

stop vs stopped?

what is the difference between; "what if we stop X" and "what if we stopped X" We are trying to write an inspirational statement, not so much a question, to provoke thought around stopping X. For ...
1
vote
2answers
1k views

How do I identify “infinitive clauses/phrases” and “subjects”?

In sentences such as the following, there is (as I understand it) an infinitive clause and an infinitive phrase. Which part is the infinitive clause and which part is the infinitive phrase? And what ...
0
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3answers
124 views

“I want [pronoun] [adjective]” vs “I want [pronoun] to be [adjective]”

Take these two sentences. 1.I want him dead. 2.I want him to be dead. What is the differences between two sentences? What does the "to be" mean?
4
votes
3answers
156 views

“To not” vs. “not to” [duplicate]

A little bit of context, I read the sentence below after the system - a computer application - has been subject to a certain kind of update: The system will be able to not create a record of that ...
0
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1answer
61 views

For a past situation: simple infinitive or perfect infinitive after “ought to”?

In Michael Vince's New First Certificate Language Practice, page 92, exercise 2, sentence number 10, you are given the sentence: "I thought that you would know better!" which has to be re-written ...
1
vote
1answer
58 views

usage of infinitive after feel [duplicate]

What is grammatically wrong with the sentence, "I feel to eat."? After the verb feel, can the infinitive of another verb be used?
0
votes
0answers
43 views

“to successfully complete” or “to complete successfully”? [duplicate]

A Google search yields 41,200,000 results for the former but only 3,150,000 for the latter. Are split infinitives really to boldly be avoided in English grammar, or are millions of people just ...
0
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1answer
159 views

Compound verbs with infinitive and gerund

Which statements are grammatically correct and which meaning do they convey, This concept helps understand the problem. This concept helps to understand the problem. This concept helps understanding ...
1
vote
4answers
452 views

Is there a difference between “way of doing something” and “way to do something”?

Is there a difference between "way of doing something" and "way to do something"? It is on purpose that I did not write "a way of doing something" or "the way of doing something" and "a way to do ...
0
votes
1answer
59 views

Difference between “is to do” and “is doing” [duplicate]

I saw below sentence: Her job is to clean the hall. So can I also say like: Her job is cleaning the hall. It's present participle or gerund? What's the different meaning between these two ...
1
vote
1answer
85 views

Should I factor-out “to” in a series of infinitives?

Which of the following two forms of the sentence is better? "Managers can use these findings to bound estimates, to assess the realism of road maps, to recognise unsustainable growth, to judge the ...
1
vote
5answers
272 views

Is it “to be left free to do something” or “to be let free to do something”?

I know "to leave someone alone" and "to let someone be on their own". What happens when the adjective is followed by a verb (in the infinitive)? Is it "*Leave me free to do whatever I want." / "*I ...
1
vote
2answers
179 views

Why do 'get' and 'have' work similarly in 'get/have sth done" but differently in 'get sb to do sth' and 'have sb do sth'

Why do 'get' and 'have' work similarly in I got/had my car repaired. but differently – that is are not complemented in the same way although they still mean the same – in I got someone to ...
0
votes
3answers
453 views

“Required to do” vs. “required doing”

Your employer is required to deduct a certain amount from your salary as a withstanding tax payable to the federal government. 'Hamlet' is required reading [= must be read] for this course. ...
4
votes
2answers
126 views

Infinitive Clause For “Curious”

I need some help about the infinitive clause that comes after "curious". Let's say that I am "curious" about a locked room. Then, could I write this: I am curious to open the door. I ...
4
votes
1answer
462 views

Why do these verbs take bare infinitives?

[a] It makes the tree grow. [b] I never heard him speak. I’m wondering why causative and sense verbs (make, hear) license bare infinitives for their complement, instead of taking to infinitives? ...
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1answer
420 views

to be p.p. or being p.p.?AND WHY? [closed]

Would you kindly tell me the difference between the following? She likes to be looked at. She likes being looked at.
1
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1answer
189 views

something is capable of to be p.p. or being p.p.? [closed]

Manual: small, helpful book capable of being carried in the hand. What is the difference between to be carried and being carried in this sentence?
0
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1answer
303 views

Usage of “but” as preposition

About usage of "but", I am confused with this sentence: You have no choice but to perform the back-test yourself. "But" is the preposition in this sentence. Why is the use of infinitive? Can I ...
0
votes
2answers
94 views

fun to make and fun to eat

“These cookies are fun to make and especially fun to eat.” (source) Semantically, these cookies is both to-infinitves’ object; and to-infinitves seems to be the semantic subject of both funs, ...
0
votes
1answer
875 views

Provide to somebody to do/doing or Provide for somebody to do/doing?

I'm writing a letter to my teacher to thank her for letting me put on a party, but I'm confused by these: I would like to thank somebody for your support, guidance and encouragement, and for the ...