Questions about verbs in their basic (unmarked) forms, such as “be”, “do”, “have”, or “sit”, sometimes introduced by the particle “to” and other times used by itself.

learn more… | top users | synonyms

0
votes
0answers
14 views

Is “to say” in Hamlet's “and by a sleep to say we end” an infinitive or an adverb?

I was trying to identify the word classes of Hamlet's famous monologue "To be or not to be", and I'm really having trouble deciding what word class "to say" in "and by sleep to say we end the ...
0
votes
0answers
26 views

Regarding the usage of the perfect infinitive is this statement correct?

Is the perfect infinitive being used correctly in this example: I wouldn't want to have kept this document all to myself the whole day knowing perfectly that you need it to work with and give it ...
0
votes
0answers
36 views

Why does this sentence have “to be sold” instead of “to sell”? [migrated]

What he did was he translated stories from all of the major European papers to be sold to other papers. Why the phrase "to be sold to other papers," not "to sell to other papers"?
-1
votes
0answers
29 views

Constructions with verbs that usually take infinitives ('I have to do it.) [migrated]

There are verbs that generally require infinitives after them, like 'have' in the sense of 'have to do sth.' Do these constructions work in a substantially different way than constructions where the ...
1
vote
0answers
52 views

Is there any difference in meaning between “We tried to get him to come to church” and “We tried to get him coming to church”? [migrated]

I heard that 'sb1 gets sb2 to do sth' means the doer (sb1) causes the recipient (sb2) to do something one time while 'sb1 gets sb2 to do sth' means the doer causes the recipient to do something ...
0
votes
0answers
21 views

Perfect infinitive in continuous form with an adjective?

Are these sentences correct? "He was rather angry to have been waiting for so long." "He was rather angry to have been made to wait for so long." "He was rather angry having been made to wait for ...
0
votes
1answer
42 views

Infinitive's Part of Speech in “Scientists have struggled for so many years to find them.”

Is "to find them" an adverbial of purpose or an adverbial of result? In other words, which of the following two sentences is closer to the sentence in the subject line: Scientists have ...
1
vote
0answers
97 views

For an infinitive functioning as an object, is it necessary that its logical subject should be identical with the subject of the sentence?

Some grammarians claims: when an infinitive functions as an object, its logical subject must be identical with the subject of the sentence. (seen in a book on grammatical analysis) Is it obligatory? ...
0
votes
0answers
29 views

Perfect infinitive with modals?

Is the sentence below grammatically correct? "If you went ahead with that plan, you would be thought/considered/believed to have made a big mistake." Thank you
0
votes
1answer
54 views

When to use a gerund or an infinitive after “is”?

How does one know when to use a gerund or an infinitive? states a 90% rule, but I'm more interested in the remaining 10%. This British Council page states Sorry, there isn’t a rule. You have to ...
0
votes
0answers
44 views

Another question about gerund vs infinitive

I'm little confused in rules about gerund. Which phrase is correct and why? If all of them are correct - what's the difference? A good way to keep in touch with old friends is using social networks....
1
vote
3answers
55 views

Infinitive verses present participle

I often come across this type of thing and wondered if anyone could tell me the correct usage. I have a sentence that reads "As you go through various settings, you will have the option to allow ...
2
votes
3answers
31 views

A question regarding the following usage of the perfect infinitive?

In regards to the usage of the perfect infinitive I've been wondering if it can be used simultaneously with verbs of perception by way of expressing your notion or belief involving either a person or ...
1
vote
2answers
45 views

'Expect to' as an expression of excitement?

In a recent test we asked students to write a sentence expressing their excitement at a future activity. We gave an example sentence using 'looking forward to'. One student wrote "I'm expecting to ...
2
votes
1answer
34 views

Is `limited to viewing` correct in this context? Your account is `limited to` viewing only the first 100 pictures

As the title says, is limited to correct in that context? Let's say for instance that Facebook offers free and paid account and Facebook only allows free account to view the first 100 pictures of ...
0
votes
0answers
16 views

“celebrating” or “to celebrate”?

The following sentences are the same except the bold parts. Which of the following sentences sounds natural to native speakers of English? A, B or both? A: Farmers who are growing rice for profit ...
0
votes
0answers
24 views

Verbs used as infintives

I want to go home. We come to help him. He was the first guy in our crowd to marry. Why "to go" is use as a noun vs. "to help" is used as an adverb vs. "to marry" is used as an adjective?
2
votes
1answer
97 views

Using too many 'to's in a sentence?

This may be more of a stylistic question than anything else, but I'm hoping for some general rules about using the word 'to' in a sentence and when it might be used too many times. For example, I'm ...
1
vote
1answer
115 views

Omitting verbs, is it correct?

I wonder if I could omit the second 'visit' in such sentence: You have to visit all the places, which she wants to (visit) Would it be correct? Thanks in advance :)
4
votes
1answer
92 views

What is the rule for two verb tenses in one sentence? [closed]

Example: I heard the bomb go off. Why is the first verb in the Past tense and the second in the Present tense?
0
votes
1answer
57 views

infinitive as indirect object

is it possible to use infinitive as indirect object ? for example the sentence ' I persuaded him to go there ' , I guess that 'him' is direct object and 'to go there' is indirect object . is it ...
1
vote
1answer
73 views

To + verb, bare verb or verb + ing in noun phrases [duplicate]

I've asked this around and I'm RACKING MY BRAIN trying to figure it out. Which one is the correct verb form in the following sentence? The craziest thing I've ever done is go / to go / going ...
0
votes
1answer
96 views

Infinitive instead of gerund, specifically after 'require' [duplicate]

I use Grammarly Chrome extension to validate my texts in English. And with some sentences I keep seeing the error message "Infinitive instead of gerund". I'm not sure if this is an appropriate error ...
0
votes
1answer
48 views

Difference between using a gerund and using to + verb root

As an objective (or subjective). "Being a teacher" vs "to be a teacher". What is the difference between gerund and 'to' + verb root ? My dream is being a teacher. My dream is to be a teacher.
-1
votes
1answer
26 views

Is this a valid construction using the the perfect infinitive

Is it correct to say " In order to have been". I understand that without context the general meaning may be difficult to interpret, but could this even be used as a valid construction with the ...
2
votes
1answer
56 views

Can an infinitive phrase be equivocal in its function in a sentence?

I have found the following sentence as an example of an infinitive phrase used as an adjective, however, it seems to me that it could also be taken as an adverb of purpose. Jane bought a radio to ...
4
votes
2answers
176 views

I have a bodyguard in order to protect myself

I have a bodyguard in order to protect myself. I was told that I cannot have a stative verb in the required condition: I have a bodyguard But I don't understand how "I need to study in order ...
0
votes
1answer
165 views

Correct verb patterns for the verb 'recommend'? [duplicate]

Which of the last three verb patterns apply to the verb 'recommend'? I recommend that you wait. (present subjunctive, American usage) I recommend that you should wait. (substitute for present ...
1
vote
1answer
74 views

To do something is something - what use of the infinitive is this?

I teach English and a student of mine recently came out with the following sentence: She thinks that to become a marketing manager is the opportunity she seeks for. I thought this was a curious ...
2
votes
1answer
88 views

Important to learn is this stuff

This song is fun to sing. This pizza is too hot to eat. Is the infinitive there considered a complement of the predicate adjective?
0
votes
1answer
36 views

I want to know usage of infinitive as adverb

for example. she lived to be ninety what does that sentence mean? Is it meaning of "she lived in order to be ninety" or "she lived and just became ninety"? I have learned it as she lived and ...
1
vote
1answer
77 views

Not sure if this is correct or not: “the ability to be able to”

The sentence: Problems are an inevitable part of life, and one could argue that happiness is not the absence of problems, but rather the ability to be able to deal with them. Is it to be ...
1
vote
4answers
146 views

“It is better to X than to Y” - the structure of a difficult comparative sentence

Take the following sentence: It is better to underestimate your abilities and overestimate your risks than to go in a direction that actually involves more uncertainty than you can justify. For ...
0
votes
1answer
40 views

Adverbial clause modification with an infinitive

Given the sentence I am unable to join you while I am on vacation "While I am on vacation" is an adverbial clause supplying the time when this sentence is true. But, does this clause modify the ...
1
vote
1answer
97 views

To Infinitive or Not Infinitive

I am wondering if the lack of infinitive "to+have" in the section highlighted below raises any flags for anyone. People have been taught have faith and to trust — or not have faith and not to ...
-1
votes
2answers
91 views

Split infinitives [duplicate]

Was taught in grammar school that this was taboo (1950's, South Africa). Today the split infinitive seems to be the standard in the USA. Changing standard? It's always even that way in the US? What ...
10
votes
5answers
673 views

How to use the infinitive in this sentence?

I am doing documentation for a web application issue and I'm not sure how best to word what I'm trying to say: "This appears to work no longer in any web browser." "This appears no longer to ...
0
votes
1answer
131 views

What part of speech is the word “to” in “Alice likes to dance”? [closed]

Annie likes to dance What part of speech is the word to? Reopen note: Merriam Webster lists it as a preposition and gives the following definition: 8 —used as a function word to indicate ...
7
votes
5answers
311 views

How does the to infinitive work with adjectives like “wrong” and “wise”?

You were wrong to pick that car I was wise to go home that day. I can't quite explain how the to-infinitive modifies the adjectives here. It's similar to sentences like "It's nice to see you" ...
2
votes
1answer
255 views

The role of infinitive in this sentence

I have a question on this sentence "It is a profitable thing, if one is wise, to seem foolish." -Aeschylus What role does to seem play in this sentence. I think it is an infinitive. But does it ...
0
votes
1answer
35 views

Repeating (or not) “to” after certain verbs

I googled it but I couldn't find the answer... maybe I didn't seek it in the proper way. My question is if "to" must be repeated in sentences such as the following ones: In the past, women ...
2
votes
1answer
107 views

Is there a difference between an adverb and an adjectival complement?

Consider the example: I am happy to wait. In some publications, the function of the infinitive is called 'adverb'. In others, it is 'complement of adjective'. Is there a difference in the naming of ...
0
votes
1answer
44 views

infinitive usage in complex sentence [duplicate]

which one is correct? An evaluation of the Cronicle interface suggests that Cronicle helped the participants to find data accurately. or An evaluation of the Cronicle interface suggests that ...
2
votes
1answer
64 views

Is the infinitive at the end of “I did whatever I wanted to do” necessary?

In a statement such as "I did whatever I wanted to do," or "I wore whatever clothes I wanted to wear," are the infinitives "to do" and "to wear" necessary? Is it improper to say "I did whatever I ...
0
votes
2answers
270 views

“look forward to” vs. “do not look forward to”

Why the sentences "We look forward to < noun> ..." and "We do not look forward to < verb>..." are both correct ? A < noun> has to be used in the first and a < verb> has to be used in the ...
0
votes
3answers
103 views

Meeting you and to meet you? [closed]

What is the difference between these two versions: I look forward to meeting you. I look forward to meet you. They seem very similar and exchangeable to me as I am a non-native speaker.
0
votes
4answers
108 views

“hope…to win the approval” - help identify parts of speech

I'm confused by this sentence: "Lakesha hopes to win the approval of her mother by switching her major from fine arts to med." I think that in this case hope is intransitive, and I think the ...
0
votes
3answers
82 views

Who would address the issue this fall?

The White House framed the announcement from the world’s two largest polluters as a move to position the countries as leaders in the fight against climate change ahead of a landmark U.N. conference to ...
0
votes
1answer
44 views

Can an infinitive phrase itself be used as a proper sentence?

I found 1a on a Jr. High EFL listening test. Is the punctuation here in 1a acceptable in this context? 1a) There are many things I have to do on Saturday. To clean my room and to water my garden. ...
1
vote
2answers
38 views

Correct usage of phrase “about + to”

I'd like to know whether the usage of 'about to' is correct in these sentences: I'm about to hate you. and I'm about to start hating you. Are either, or both, of these examples wrong?