Questions about verbs in their basic (unmarked) forms, such as “be”, “do”, “have”, or “sit”, sometimes introduced by the particle “to” and other times used by itself.

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1answer
43 views

To do something is something - what use of the infinitive is this?

I teach English and a student of mine recently came out with the following sentence: She thinks that to become a marketing manager is the opportunity she seeks for. I thought this was a curious ...
2
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1answer
70 views

Important to learn is this stuff

This song is fun to sing. This pizza is too hot to eat. Is the infinitive there considered a complement of the predicate adjective?
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1answer
23 views

I want to know usage of infinitive as adverb

for example. she lived to be ninety what does that sentence mean? Is it meaning of "she lived in order to be ninety" or "she lived and just became ninety"? I have learned it as she lived and ...
1
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1answer
58 views

Not sure if this is correct or not: “the ability to be able to”

The sentence: Problems are an inevitable part of life, and one could argue that happiness is not the absence of problems, but rather the ability to be able to deal with them. Is it to be ...
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4answers
107 views

“It is better to X than to Y” - the structure of a difficult comparative sentence

Take the following sentence: It is better to underestimate your abilities and overestimate your risks than to go in a direction that actually involves more uncertainty than you can justify. For ...
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1answer
24 views

Adverbial clause modification with an infinitive

Given the sentence I am unable to join you while I am on vacation "While I am on vacation" is an adverbial clause supplying the time when this sentence is true. But, does this clause modify the ...
1
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1answer
80 views

To Infinitive or Not Infinitive

I am wondering if the lack of infinitive "to+have" in the section highlighted below raises any flags for anyone. People have been taught have faith and to trust — or not have faith and not to ...
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2answers
71 views

Split infinitives [duplicate]

Was taught in grammar school that this was taboo (1950's, South Africa). Today the split infinitive seems to be the standard in the USA. Changing standard? It's always even that way in the US? What ...
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5answers
650 views

How to use the infinitive in this sentence?

I am doing documentation for a web application issue and I'm not sure how best to word what I'm trying to say: "This appears to work no longer in any web browser." "This appears no longer to ...
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1answer
89 views

What part of speech is the word “to” in “Alice likes to dance”? [closed]

Annie likes to dance What part of speech is the word to? Reopen note: Merriam Webster lists it as a preposition and gives the following definition: 8 —used as a function word to indicate ...
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2answers
50 views

How does the to infinitive work with adjectives like “wrong” and “wise”?

You were wrong to pick that car I was wise to go home that day. I can't quite explain how the to infinitive modifies the adjectives here. It's similar to sentences like "It's nice to see ...
2
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1answer
227 views

The role of infinitive in this sentence

I have a question on this sentence "It is a profitable thing, if one is wise, to seem foolish." -Aeschylus What role does to seem play in this sentence. I think it is an infinitive. But does it ...
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1answer
26 views

Repeating (or not) “to” after certain verbs

I googled it but I couldn't find the answer... maybe I didn't seek it in the proper way. My question is if "to" must be repeated in sentences such as the following ones: In the past, women ...
2
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1answer
89 views

Is there a difference between an adverb and an adjectival complement?

Consider the example: I am happy to wait. In some publications, the function of the infinitive is called 'adverb'. In others, it is 'complement of adjective'. Is there a difference in the naming of ...
0
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1answer
26 views

infinitive usage in complex sentence [duplicate]

which one is correct? An evaluation of the Cronicle interface suggests that Cronicle helped the participants to find data accurately. or An evaluation of the Cronicle interface suggests that ...
2
votes
1answer
48 views

Is the infinitive at the end of “I did whatever I wanted to do” necessary?

In a statement such as "I did whatever I wanted to do," or "I wore whatever clothes I wanted to wear," are the infinitives "to do" and "to wear" necessary? Is it improper to say "I did whatever I ...
0
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2answers
131 views

“look forward to” vs. “do not look forward to”

Why the sentences "We look forward to < noun> ..." and "We do not look forward to < verb>..." are both correct ? A < noun> has to be used in the first and a < verb> has to be used in the ...
0
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3answers
77 views

Meeting you and to meet you? [closed]

What is the difference between these two versions: I look forward to meeting you. I look forward to meet you. They seem very similar and exchangeable to me as I am a non-native speaker.
0
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3answers
72 views

“hope…to win the approval” - help identify parts of speech

I'm confused by this sentence: "Lakesha hopes to win the approval of her mother by switching her major from fine arts to med." I think that in this case hope is intransitive, and I think the ...
0
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3answers
76 views

Who would address the issue this fall?

The White House framed the announcement from the world’s two largest polluters as a move to position the countries as leaders in the fight against climate change ahead of a landmark U.N. conference ...
0
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1answer
39 views

Can an infinitive phrase itself be used as a proper sentence?

I found 1a on a Jr. High EFL listening test. Is the punctuation here in 1a acceptable in this context? 1a) There are many things I have to do on Saturday. To clean my room and to water my garden. ...
1
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2answers
32 views

Correct usage of phrase “about + to”

I'd like to know whether the usage of 'about to' is correct in these sentences: I'm about to hate you. and I'm about to start hating you. Are either, or both, of these examples wrong?
3
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1answer
351 views

Watch the sun go down [duplicate]

In the sentence: I'd like to watch the sun go down why there is no "to"? Why not: I'd like to watch the sun to go down
2
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1answer
51 views

How does the word “to” function with an infinitive?

I've gone through all the questions and answers on infinities and although they explain whether or not an infinitive should be marked or bare with certain words, nowhere can I find an explanation as ...
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0answers
92 views

Using a “to-infinitive” after coordinating conjunctions (e.g., “and”) or not?

I am wondering whether the "to" should be repeated after a coordinating conjunction or not. For example, a) [...] practical examples to round up the learning experience and provide the tools for ...
1
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1answer
43 views

Usage of “to spend” instead of gerund [duplicate]

In the following sentence, although a gerund would be preferred, is the usage of "to spend" correct? "Do you really think it's worth it to spend hundreds of pounds on video games?"
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2answers
41 views

Want + Present Participle or Infinitive? [duplicate]

I want people to enjoy the show. or I want people enjoying the show. Is it possible to use both?
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1answer
83 views

Why 'doing' after 'look forward to'?

Normally, 'I want to do something', 'nice to meet you', that the verb always be its normal status. But why 'look forward to doing'?For example, I am looking forward to seeing all of the great ideas ...
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1answer
317 views

“dedicated to helping people ” or “dedicated to help people” [closed]

I have this sentence: I'm a volunteer in an organization that is dedicated to helping people find answers about life in the Bible. or it should be I'm a volunteer in an organization that is ...
0
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1answer
38 views

Usage of “so to” in the place of “to” as part of infinitive construction

Example: We make wine by hand in small lots and taste the wines constantly so to profit from its constant change. I would normally drop the "so" and phrase it like "we do it to profit" Are both ...
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3answers
59 views

The police officer ordered the gunman (to) drop his weapon

(1) The police officer ordered that the gunman drop his weapon. (2) The police officer ordered the gunman to drop his weapon. I think these mean virtually the same. Perhaps, the act of ...
2
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1answer
47 views

He happened + infin

I happened to see... In sentences like this, is the infinitive the object of happen? Can happen be transitive?
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2answers
105 views

“approach to provide” or “approach to providing”

An energy-efficient approach to provide an optimal solution to this problem. An energy-efficient approach to providing an optimal solution to this problem.
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2answers
94 views

Present perfect VS infinitive verb

I was wondering why the first sentence below (where the verb "have scored" is present perfect form) is wrong while the second sentence (where the verb "to score" is infinitive) is correct. He ...
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1answer
667 views

When to use “love to do something” and “love doing something”? [duplicate]

OK, I searched similar questions on http://english.stackexchange.com/ and it seems that people say that to love to do something=prefer to do something to love doing something=enjoy doing ...
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1answer
51 views

“After taking a rest, I get ready for job”

Is the following sentence grammatical? After taking a rest, I get ready for job. I think the statement above sounds informal. I'm also unclear as to what it means. Would English native ...
0
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1answer
33 views

participle phrase or to-infinitive phrase

In response to the long-term measures recommended by the School Board, the then Principal initiated the Pledge Day on “Clean LA", to encourage all schools to make the “Clean LA” commitment on ...
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1answer
132 views

What's the origin of the “Dare to …” pattern for slogans?

There are many slogans stated as an imperative of the form "Dare to X", where "to X" is an infinitive phrase. This typically exhorts the listener to do X, without fear or hesitation. It may ...
2
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2answers
72 views

Infinitive or gerund [duplicate]

So, I've got this phrase: ''Far from fleeing monotony, animals crave it, and what they most dread is to see it end.'' Can someone explain me why it is written ''to see it end'' rather than ''to see ...
0
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1answer
78 views

What to use?: Infinitive, bare infinitive or gerund as a complement after an expression [duplicate]

I came across some sentences and I was wondering which word is correct: 'train,' 'to train' or 'training'? What we should do is train our workers to become more efficient. All I we do is train our ...
2
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2answers
262 views

{To verb 1 + verb 2} or {to verb 1 + **to** verb 2}?

How to have two "to + verbs"? Is it to verb 1 + verb 2 or to verb 1 + to verb 2? Lead a team to integrate two systems and increase the accuracy of report. Lead a team to integrate two systems and to ...
2
votes
2answers
159 views

Force someone to do what you want [to] [do]

1) Don't force your friends to do what you want to do. 2) Don't force your friends to do what you want to. 3) Don't force your friends to do what you want. I think 1) is 'Don't force your friends ...
2
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1answer
300 views

The “to~” infinitive always implies the future, except for preference Like and Love

A fellow teacher said to me that the to~ infinitive always implies the future..."to eat", "to swim" etc. I disagreed and said that I thought it was abstract and had no tense in of itself. He pointed ...
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0answers
22 views

Using to + gerund and to + invinitive [duplicate]

"I go to school" Because 'to' is a preposition then is it correct to write "I go to watching the movie"? If not, please explain why. Thank you.
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1answer
92 views

Comma before a conjunction that precedes an infinitive phrase?

I understand that a comma is used before "and" when the conjunction precedes an independent clause; however, I'm curious if the same rule applies when it precedes an infinitive phrase: "It was my job ...
0
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1answer
158 views

Adverb or adjective when used to describe an infinitive?

"To play basketball" is an infinitive phrase. An infinitive phrase is generally used as a noun. Is the word "professionally" as in "To play basketball professionally..." an adjective or an adverb? Is ...
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0answers
62 views

What is special about Anglo-French legal usage of [the] infinitive as a noun?

I was reading the etymology of attainder (n.), when I saw its reference to: use of French infinitives as nouns, especially in legal language, see waiver. waiver (n.) [<--] [...] Other ...
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0answers
85 views

How does one correctly use the 'verb + infinitive' construction?

Which option is correct? I want add something. I want to add something. If there is a general rule, please describe it. If you know how to better name the topic, propose your own version.
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2answers
44 views

Using the perfect infinitive in this way?

Is it correct to use the perfect infinitive in this way? "I want it to have been finished by that time" instead of "I want it to be finished by that time". " "I wanted it to have been finished ...
3
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3answers
196 views

Why is “to” not appropriate before “be” in this situation?

Consider the following two phrases: It's better to be <X> than <Y>. Why be <X> when you can be <Y>? I recently got in an argument with a friend about if (and why) there ...