Questions about verbs in their basic (unmarked) forms, such as “be”, “do”, “have”, or “sit”, sometimes introduced by the particle “to” and other times used by itself.

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0
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2answers
29 views

Using the perfect infinitive in this way?

Is it correct to use the perfect infinitive in this way? "I want it to have been finished by that time" instead of "I want it to be finished by that time". " "I wanted it to have been finished ...
2
votes
1answer
59 views

Why is “to” not appropriate before “be” in this situation?

Consider the following two phrases: It's better to be <X> than <Y>. Why be <X> when you can be <Y>? I recently got in an argument with a friend about if (and why) there ...
3
votes
4answers
508 views

Why is the verb used without “-s” in this sentence? [duplicate]

In order to help the system make a better guess of the corner locations,... In this sentence, why is "make" not succeeded by "s"? It seems it is needed!
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0answers
5 views

How do I determine the main verb in a sentence? [migrated]

I'm not a native speaker. How do I determine what the main verb is in a sentence like I used to hurt people.
0
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0answers
28 views

[infinitive]How is it to work as a teacher? vs How is to work as a teacher?

How is it to work as a teacher? vs How is to work as a teacher? I think the first sentence has one superfluous word, 'it'. I sure know 'it' refers to 'to work as a teacher?' Why do you use the first ...
3
votes
2answers
106 views

“to require someone to do something” vs “to require that someone do something”

Professor required his students to return their papers typed. vs Professor required that his students return their papers typed. Which of the examples is correct? Do they have ...
2
votes
1answer
86 views

What does the perfect infinitive mean?

I came across a sentence recently: Before I turn 40, I want to have written a book. Could someone explain to me what does it actually mean? I'd rather say: Before I turn 40, I want to write a book. ...
0
votes
1answer
29 views

Infinitive modifier subject or object or depends on context

I gave her medicine to keep from falling sick. Is this sentence right? Intended meaning is that I have a friend who is not feeling well therefore, I gave her medicine so that she will not be ...
1
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2answers
52 views

What is the meaning of “ I was only to do that”? [closed]

I am a non-native English learner. Does the sentense "I was only to do that" mean "There was nothing I could do"? Gramatically what is "only" here? Is it an adjective or an adverb to modify " be ...
1
vote
2answers
52 views

“We have to be hard on you, you have to be cured”

"We have to be hard on you, you have to be cured," is grammatically correct? Shouldn't it be "We have to be hard on you; you have to be cured," as these are two independent clauses. I've seen it in ...
2
votes
2answers
87 views

Why can't I use the word 'to' after the verb 'helped'?

I know it is incorrect to say, "They helped to her" and that it should be, "They helped her", but why is the word "to" not needed? And yet the word to is in this sentence: "They helped to get her ...
2
votes
2answers
78 views

About Infinitive

I know that this sentence is correct: "He is not a man to tell a lie." Is it also correct if I say "He is not a man tell a lie." If it's correct what is the difference between these ...
0
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2answers
57 views

Infinitive usage (which sentence is correct)

I am working on the lyrics for one of my songs and english is not my first language. Here's the question - which of these sentences is correct? No thorns to prick your heart No thorns to prick your ...
2
votes
0answers
45 views

'that' + (pro)noun + infinitive: what grammar is behind such construct? [duplicate]

While reading a technical book, I stumbled upon the following sentence: It is important [that all Java programmers be fully versed in, and comfortable with, the traditional approach]. For me, ...
1
vote
0answers
30 views

Q: some of the profits my business earns from the community **BE** returned to the community. (grammar) [duplicate]

I feel it is important that some of the profits my business earns from the community be returned to the community. Why does the author say "be"? I don't understand usage of grammar in this ...
0
votes
1answer
80 views

Gerund vs infinitive paraphrase

Is there any difference between these two sentences: "The Democrats tend to increase taxes, discouraging rich people from voting for them" "The Democrats tend to increase taxes, which discourages ...
0
votes
1answer
90 views

What comes first—verb or adverb? [duplicate]

Do you say, to effectively communicate or would you say to communicate effectively. As ENL learner I get this confused quite often. Thanks.
1
vote
1answer
114 views

Infinitive in news headlines

I'm a little bit confused with understanding news titles. I recently started to read news in English willing to improve my language skills, but there is one thing that I totally can't understand (and ...
4
votes
1answer
137 views

Is there a better term for “perfect infinitive”, “perfect participle” or “perfect gerund”?

BACKGROUND There are grammar terms such as 'present perfect' and 'past perfect' as in: She has learned English for 10 years. [present perfect] She had learned English when she was little. ...
1
vote
1answer
63 views

Infinitive vs. “ing” + past particle [duplicate]

Among the earliest telescopes were Galilean telescopes, modeled after the simple instruments built by Galileo, the first person having used telescopes to study the stars and planets. I know ...
0
votes
1answer
41 views

Can infinitives serve as direct objects? [duplicate]

In the sentences Jack wants food and Jack wants to eat, it seems like food and to eat both serve as direct objects of the verb wants. Can a verb in the infinitive serve as a direct object in a ...
3
votes
1answer
202 views

Split infinitives—did Old English have them?

I've read a few articles as well as questions on this site about splitting infinitives. In the Wikipedia article, it claims: In Old English, infinitives were single words ending in -n or -an ...
-1
votes
2answers
53 views

Word usage of “not to fly” vs “to not fly ” [duplicate]

I often read the phrase "not to" preceding an action, as in "not to run" or "not to swim". It seems awkward. Please explain explain the usage.
0
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2answers
68 views

What parents enjoy is playing/play? [closed]

I have a question; is it better to say: What parents enjoy doing is playing with their children. or: What parents enjoy is playing with their children. or: What parents enjoy is play ...
0
votes
0answers
25 views

“Prefer” usage - If the emphasis is on the habit --ing form or to-infinitive? [duplicate]

-ing form : Most people prefer watching a film at the cinema rather than on TV. -to-infinitive form: We prefer to drive during the day whenever we can. Which of the above two sentences ...
1
vote
1answer
96 views

To + verb in sentence without any other verb

From time to time I come across a sentence with to + verb, but with no other verb in it. I see it often in news titles. For example: Squall, Tina and Lightning to appear in Final Fantasy Explorers ...
2
votes
1answer
80 views

Using a perfect infinitive construction to express uncertainty

My sentence: " I needed for her to have called me." The only example that I can find is from google books- title: The Ghost of Samuel Cetawayo" with a similar use of the perfect infinitive: "I had ...
1
vote
2answers
152 views

Ellipsis in “can and have occurred”

The side effects can and have occurred. The omitted verb is an infinitive (occur) but the written verb is a past participle (occurred). Is this sentence grammatically correct and suitable for ...
0
votes
1answer
227 views

Clauses of purpose: “for + -ing” or "to-infinitive [duplicate]

In the following sentence, how should the clause of purpose be introduced? In addition to normal maintenance, there are additional costs associated with interventions that may be required to ...
-1
votes
2answers
206 views

Why must the infinitive be used after “I am qualified to”?

I am not able to understand why the infinitive must be used after "I am qualified to". For example I am qualified to teach. Does not to play the role of preposition in this sentence? If the ...
-1
votes
2answers
250 views

going + ing vs going + infinitive, when use which?

In the middle of a conversation I should use which of the follow sentences: Tomorrow, I'm going climbing. or Tomorrow, I'm going to climb. I did a deep search and I found these similar ...
1
vote
1answer
619 views

“I hope I enjoy myself very much” is this correct?

I hope I enjoy myself very much I came across the above expression when I was reading something, the writer wasn't a native English speaker. She was talking about visiting a place she wanted to ...
-1
votes
1answer
133 views

Do “it is time for someone to do something” and “it is time someone did something” mean the same thing?

I know that It is time (understood: for the speaker or for a group of people including the speaker) to do something. and It is time I or we did something. do not mean the same thing: the first is ...
0
votes
1answer
643 views

“glad to receive something” or “glad to have received something”? [closed]

which is correct? "I am glad to receive your letter." or "I am glad to have received your letter." The intent is to talk about a specific letter recently received in the past.
1
vote
3answers
105 views

Trouble with translating a sentence [closed]

I am not a native English speaker, so I am not sure I understand the bolded sentence correctly: The anti-hero is actually the main character in some contemporary works of literature. Guy Montag in ...
0
votes
2answers
1k views

'decide not to' or 'decide to not' ? [duplicate]

I came up with this question when I received an email from a committee with a sentence 'We have decided not to publish it', which seems really strange to me because the grammar I learned in English ...
1
vote
0answers
102 views

What are the grammatical phrases in this sentence?

I'm analyzing this sentence and scanning it for prepositional, appositive and verbal phrases. In the sentence so far as I can tell there is only one prepositional and no appositive and no verbals ...
0
votes
1answer
94 views

Usage of “to find out” [closed]

Your father climbed to some rough rocks near the coast to find out that under the rocks, our friend Lake lies severely wounded. Is this usage of "to find something by chance (as a result of ...
0
votes
0answers
42 views

I don't like [you to go there] [duplicate]

I don’t like you going there. I don’t like you to go there. Like can take both -ing and a to-infinitive as complement. But can the expression that the matrix subject and the subject of ...
2
votes
1answer
295 views

What's to do? vs. What's to be done?

In order to ask What should be done? or What should we do? using an infinitival clause, you can readily say What's to be done? or What to do?. (1) What's to do? But I've heard (1) used in the ...
-1
votes
2answers
146 views

The meeting IS TO take place at 10 pm [closed]

The meeting is to take place at 10 pm Should "Is to" be mean here as "have to" or "going to"? Another example: Those of you, who sign up are to be commended. This kind of sentences confusing me a ...
0
votes
1answer
337 views

What’s the difference between “to VERB” and “to be VERBed”?

What is the difference between these two statements: A new version of Java is ready to install. A new version of Java is ready to be installed.
4
votes
1answer
74 views

Are both of these Raising’s?

[i] Equi Billᵢ wants [[(for) Billᵢ] to leave at noon] [Billᵢ wants [ __ ᵢ to leave at noon]] [ii] Raising [[(For) the casserole] to be done] seems The casserole seems [to be done] ...
1
vote
1answer
89 views

Pres. perfect + going to + past infinitive

I have seen the following sentence: For four months now John has been going to have finished his novel by today. I hope I understand it (I assume it says that he has been trying to finish his ...
1
vote
3answers
116 views

“It takes” + infinitive vs. present participle

Is it grammatically correct to say "It took me five hours travelling to the US"? Most people would say "It took me five hours to travel to the US." I wonder if the infinitive is always the only ...
4
votes
5answers
3k views

“It is to be discussed”, what is the infinitive doing in this sentence?

It is to be discussed. Is be + infinitive forming the future tense here? You are to be dressed and ready by 8:00. I was thinking it's almost commanding (or speaking of a command) but this ...
2
votes
2answers
82 views

“This video shows a heart transplant take place” or “taking place”?

Which is the correct version of this sentence: This video shows a heart transplant take place. This video shows a heart transplant taking place. I have a hunch that both are correct, ...
4
votes
2answers
425 views

Do the -ing and to-infinitive “verbs” that follow catenative verbs always take the grammatical function of “noun”?

I'm wondering whether or not the verb form that follows a catenative verb has the grammatical function of a noun or of a verb, and whether or not it depends on the first catenative verb. "I like to ...
2
votes
1answer
66 views

A question about “to becoming” [duplicate]

Would this sentence be correct? Being scared is the first step to becoming free. The more I look at it, the less clear it becomes.
2
votes
1answer
206 views

Is it grammatical to say of some potential meaning that it is “able to be said” or “trying to be said”?

A recent commenter on a recent word-search question nominated a term as “an even better word for what is trying to be said.” This seems to me to attribute intention to something—a ...