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0answers
31 views

The verb “gift” followed by the indirect object [closed]

I am editing English translations of Arabic poetry for a multilingual literary journal, and stumbled across the following stanza: Smile, my darling, Give a gift to the world that gifts you, ...
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1answer
54 views

“He who” as an indirect object [duplicate]

Is the following incorrect? Return it to he who gave it to you. Presuming it is, how would I correct it? (without resorting to saying "to the person who gave it to you," which is somewhat ...
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5answers
2k views

Is “ Whom did you give the book? ” ungrammatical?

You gave him the book. (1) Based on the sentence (1), it seems to me that the following form of question is possible: Whom did you give the book? (2) instead of To whom ...
4
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2answers
157 views

Indirect objects that answer the question “by whom”

Here is a sentence from Chapter Seventeen of Huckleberry Finn. The sentence appears in a grammar worksheet: When I got to the three log doorsteps I heard them unlocking and unbarring and ...
4
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3answers
313 views

Why does a pronoun as the predicate of an indirect object (e.g. “I gave her it”) sound wrong?

Forgive me if I've used the wrong terms in the title, I did my best given my middle-school grammar lessons and Wikipedia. "I gave her the book" sounds just fine, but "I gave her it" sounds stilted ...
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1answer
52 views

Question about indirect object?

Grammar is driving me crazy. What would crazy be in this sentence? Is it an indirect object?
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2answers
162 views

“The mixture was added water”: Is “add” a double-object verb?

The mixture was added water. This sentence, written by a non-native speaker, seems somehow odd to me, but I cannot say that I find it at all ambiguous. This example sentence is written by a ...
5
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6answers
874 views

Indirect object? Direct object? In active voice? In passive voice?

The following sentence has an active voice verb and an indirect object (IO) me and a direct object (DO) book: "Jeff gave me a book." As I understand, a passive voice verb comprises (1) a form of the ...
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2answers
49 views

Does including an indirect object in a question change the answer or just help specify it?

For example, I'm trying to figure out what the proper answer to a question like, "Why did the car blow up two weeks ago?" Would the answer to the question be simply the reason why the car blew up, ...
1
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1answer
88 views

Can the verb “gain” take two complements?

Is it correct to say: The prudent guidance and innovation gained Jane and John much fame. I think that this sentence is grammatically incorrect because the verb gain cannot take two complements ...
3
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2answers
224 views

Direct object before indirect object

In this article on the changes in English grammar the author says: How untrammelled the English passive is, may be seen in the fact that, not content with a construction like “A book was given ...
6
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2answers
233 views

Indirect vs direct object

Consider the two sentences John taught himself calculus. John taught himself. In the first sentence 'himself' is the indirect object and 'calculus' is the direct object. In the second ...
2
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1answer
106 views

What is the meaning “It is permitted us to know …”

I saw a sentence It is permitted us to know respecting the signs, which are spoken by the prophets, for they foretold signs by which the consummation of the times is to be expected by us from day ...
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1answer
368 views

send something to someone|somewhere

Background: I am writing a computer application which can understand English sentence. For that purpose, I was preparing frames of each word. For example: send something to recipient|place ...
0
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2answers
176 views

How do I differentiate between direct and indirect object with an object of a preposition present?

I am working on the following sentence: They will look toward me, whom they pierced. I am aware that a basic rule to identifying an indirect object is to ask, "to whom?" However, in this case, I ...
1
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1answer
239 views

Time given us or time given to us

I read this quote online: "All we have to decide is what to do with the time that is given us" - J. R. R. Tolkien Is it just a relaxation of pronunciation of "the time that [god] has given us" ? ...
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8answers
7k views

Can a sentence have an indirect object without a direct object?

Everywhere I look online, people seem to say the same thing: "A sentence with an indirect object must have a direct object." Every case of confusion I've seen about this rule has only involved ...
1
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1answer
272 views

Using only a direct object with the verb “give”

Is it possible to use the verb give with only a direct object? For example, Could you give the definition? Or need I to add an indirect object, so the sentence becomes Could you give me the ...
-1
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2answers
144 views

Direct Object vs Indirect Object in “I taught my cat”

In the sentence "I taught my cat some tricks", the direct object is "tricks" and the indirect object is "cat". In the sentence "I taught my cat", what are the direct and indirect objects, if any?
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1answer
137 views

Another 'me' versus 'myself' usage question

I am quitting a job. I wrote a letter of resignation and have come upon the following sentence: "Moreover, I believe [name of restaurant] will be better suited to have an employee that is different ...
5
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1answer
717 views

Do indirect objects in English always mean “to” or “for”?

"I gave him two dollars." This tacitly means "to him". Are there exceptions to the rule that an indirect object in English always means "to" or "for"? In English, "I stole him two dollars" does not ...
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4answers
1k views

Why is “look” transitive in “look you in the eye”?

Why is look used as a transitive verb in the phrase look you in the eye? I checked look in Cambridge Dictionaries and found only an intransitive look, not a transitive one.
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1answer
43 views

Does this have an indirect object?

I met a kind person As far as I know: subject = I; met = verb; But seems like "kind person" is a direct object. Is there no indirect object?
0
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1answer
451 views

How to combine in a sentence two verb–preposition pairs that have the same TWO objects?

How could one combine succinctly two verbs with the same two objects with different prepositions? For example, if I can either add gifts to a box and remove gifts from the box, what would be the most ...
0
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4answers
116 views

Is it still an indirect object if you're taking something away?

So Jim is the indirect object in the sentence "Sally gave Jim a sandwich." But is Jim still the indirect object if the sentence is "Sally took the sandwich from Jim"? And if the sentence were to ...
1
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1answer
601 views

Sentence patterns: There are 16 ways to “leave” your book

Playing around in my head with the different positions that a subject, verb, direct object, and indirect object can be positioned in one sentence, I ended up with 16 sentences using only the simple ...
7
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2answers
3k views

According to me, it was acceptable, but according to him, it wasn't

I once had a piece of written work corrected by a very experienced English teacher who told me that writing "according to me" sounded weird and nobody who was English/British would ever say it. I ...
1
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1answer
6k views

Use of verb to give is used alone or with preposition “to”? [duplicate]

Why is it that when I say "I will give this book to my daughter", I am using the verb "give" and the preposition "to", but "to" is not used in the following: "What kind of names do people in your ...
1
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2answers
1k views

Direct object and indirect object in the sentence “Bill promised Mary to fix her car.”

In the following sentence Bill promised Mary to fix her car. Maybe I can write this sentence like this: Bill promised Mary (for Bill) to fix her car. Bill is the subject of the verb fix, ...
7
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3answers
3k views

Why “answer me” but not “answer me the question”?

Why are "answer me" and "answer the question" acceptable but not "answer me the question"? Is it similar to "explain me (something)"?
1
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3answers
2k views

“I gave him + INDIRECT OBJECT” vs. “I gave + INDIRECT OBJECT+ to him”

Consider these two sentences: "I gave him a pencil," and, "I gave a pencil to him." Is it correct that the important part of the sentence is placed at the end? When we want to emphasize the pencil ...
1
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2answers
10k views

Why do we say “I envy you your <something>”?

That construction has always bothered me. People will say it's because you envy a person not a thing, and that on the surface is okay, but then why isn't it I envy you for your thing, or because of ...
69
votes
4answers
9k views

What's wrong with “I'll open you the door”?

When I call the buzzer outside my girlfriend's flat, she sometimes says *"I'll open you the door". I correct this to "I'll open the door for you". I've never heard a native speaker say it the first ...
2
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1answer
140 views

Usage of begrudge

While looking up this word, I found a weird usage, for example: She begrudged Martin his affluence She begrudged her friend the award. Applying common sense, it's clear that she envied her ...
1
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1answer
395 views

Can I say “acquire someone something”?

It’s common to say “someone acquires something”, but is it OK to say “acquires someone something”? For example, it is possible to say His character acquires him a good name.                   ...
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2answers
5k views

“Ask me anything” and “Ask anything to me”

There are some sentences I hear regularly: Ask me anything Ask anything to me. If you ask me whether he was right, I would tell you "No". If you ask me about whether he was right, .... ...
9
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3answers
3k views

Recommend someone

I'd like to ask about the use of the verb "recommend" in the following sentences: We'd recommend you to book your flight early. The plumber recommended me to buy a new water heater. The ...
9
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5answers
114k views

Which one is more appropriate to use: “send you” or “send to you”?

Are both of the following sentences correct? Let me know if there is still something I need to send to you. Let me know if there is still something I need to send you. Which one is more ...
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4answers
10k views

Is it incorrect to say, 'Give me it'?

Is it incorrect to say, 'Give me it' ? I am told that it is and one should always say, 'Give it me'?
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2answers
7k views

“Subject, verb, direct object, object complement” versus “subject, verb, indirect object, direct object”

Reading English Grammar (HarperCollins College Outline, published by HarperResource, an imprint of HarperCollinsPublishers) I found a chapter (Sentence Basics) that explains that in English there are ...