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2
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2answers
60 views

Direct object before indirect object

In this article on the changes in English grammar the author says: How untrammelled the English passive is, may be seen in the fact that, not content with a construction like “A book was given ...
4
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1answer
73 views

Indirect vs direct object

Consider the two sentences John taught himself calculus. John taught himself. In the first sentence 'himself' is the indirect object and 'calculus' is the direct object. In the second ...
2
votes
1answer
81 views

What is the meaning “It is permitted us to know …”

I saw a sentence It is permitted us to know respecting the signs, which are spoken by the prophets, for they foretold signs by which the consummation of the times is to be expected by us from day ...
1
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1answer
93 views

send something to someone|somewhere

Background: I am writing a computer application which can understand English sentence. For that purpose, I was preparing frames of each word. For example: send something to recipient|place ...
0
votes
2answers
92 views

How do I differentiate between direct and indirect object with an object of a preposition present?

I am working on the following sentence: They will look toward me, whom they pierced. I am aware that a basic rule to identifying an indirect object is to ask, "to whom?" However, in this case, I ...
1
vote
1answer
74 views

Time given us or time given to us

I read this quote online: "All we have to decide is what to do with the time that is given us" - J. R. R. Tolkien Is it just a relaxation of pronunciation of "the time that [god] has given us" ? ...
5
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6answers
3k views

Can a sentence have an indirect object without a direct object?

Everywhere I look online, people seem to say the same thing: "A sentence with an indirect object must have a direct object." Every case of confusion I've seen about this rule has only involved ...
1
vote
1answer
143 views

Using only a direct object with the verb “give”

Is it possible to use the verb give with only a direct object? For example, Could you give the definition? Or need I to add an indirect object, so the sentence becomes Could you give me the ...
-1
votes
2answers
116 views

Direct Object vs Indirect Object in “I taught my cat”

In the sentence "I taught my cat some tricks", the direct object is "tricks" and the indirect object is "cat". In the sentence "I taught my cat", what are the direct and indirect objects, if any?
0
votes
1answer
106 views

Another 'me' versus 'myself' usage question

I am quitting a job. I wrote a letter of resignation and have come upon the following sentence: "Moreover, I believe [name of restaurant] will be better suited to have an employee that is different ...
5
votes
1answer
503 views

Do indirect objects in English always mean “to” or “for”?

"I gave him two dollars." This tacitly means "to him". Are there exceptions to the rule that an indirect object in English always means "to" or "for"? In English, "I stole him two dollars" does not ...
4
votes
4answers
515 views

Why is “look” transitive in “look you in the eye”?

Why is look used as a transitive verb in the phrase look you in the eye? I checked look in Cambridge Dictionaries and found only an intransitive look, not a transitive one.
0
votes
1answer
36 views

Does this have an indirect object?

I met a kind person As far as I know: subject = I; met = verb; But seems like "kind person" is a direct object. Is there no indirect object?
0
votes
1answer
297 views

How to combine in a sentence two verb–preposition pairs that have the same TWO objects?

How could one combine succinctly two verbs with the same two objects with different prepositions? For example, if I can either add gifts to a box and remove gifts from the box, what would be the most ...
0
votes
4answers
104 views

Is it still an indirect object if you're taking something away?

So Jim is the indirect object in the sentence "Sally gave Jim a sandwich." But is Jim still the indirect object if the sentence is "Sally took the sandwich from Jim"? And if the sentence were to ...
1
vote
1answer
489 views

Sentence patterns: There are 16 ways to “leave” your book

Playing around in my head with the different positions that a subject, verb, direct object, and indirect object can be positioned in one sentence, I ended up with 16 sentences using only the simple ...
6
votes
2answers
1k views

According to me, it was acceptable, but according to him, it wasn't

I once had a piece of written work corrected by a very experienced English teacher who told me that writing "according to me" sounded weird and nobody who was English/British would ever say it. I ...
1
vote
1answer
3k views

Use of verb to give is used alone or with preposition “to”? [duplicate]

Why is it that when I say "I will give this book to my daughter", I am using the verb "give" and the preposition "to", but "to" is not used in the following: "What kind of names do people in your ...
1
vote
2answers
1k views

Direct object and indirect object in the sentence “Bill promised Mary to fix her car.”

In the following sentence Bill promised Mary to fix her car. Maybe I can write this sentence like this: Bill promised Mary (for Bill) to fix her car. Bill is the subject of the verb fix, ...
7
votes
3answers
2k views

Why “answer me” but not “answer me the question”?

Why are "answer me" and "answer the question" acceptable but not "answer me the question"? Is it similar to "explain me (something)"?
1
vote
3answers
2k views

“I gave him + INDIRECT OBJECT” vs. “I gave + INDIRECT OBJECT+ to him”

Consider these two sentences: "I gave him a pencil," and, "I gave a pencil to him." Is it correct that the important part of the sentence is placed at the end? When we want to emphasize the pencil ...
2
votes
2answers
7k views

Why do we say “I envy you your <something>”?

That construction has always bothered me. People will say it's because you envy a person not a thing, and that on the surface is okay, but then why isn't it I envy you for your thing, or because of ...
61
votes
4answers
7k views

What's wrong with “I'll open you the door”?

When I call the buzzer outside my girlfriend's flat, she sometimes says *"I'll open you the door". I correct this to "I'll open the door for you". I've never heard a native speaker say it the first ...
2
votes
1answer
123 views

Usage of begrudge

While looking up this word, I found a weird usage, for example: She begrudged Martin his affluence She begrudged her friend the award. Applying common sense, it's clear that she envied her ...
1
vote
1answer
297 views

Can I say “acquire someone something”?

It’s common to say “someone acquires something”, but is it OK to say “acquires someone something”? For example, it is possible to say His character acquires him a good name.                   ...
0
votes
2answers
3k views

“Ask me anything” and “Ask anything to me”

There are some sentences I hear regularly: Ask me anything Ask anything to me. If you ask me whether he was right, I would tell you "No". If you ask me about whether he was right, .... ...
9
votes
3answers
2k views

Recommend someone

I'd like to ask about the use of the verb "recommend" in the following sentences: We'd recommend you to book your flight early. The plumber recommended me to buy a new water heater. The ...
7
votes
5answers
77k views

Which one is more appropriate to use: “send you” or “send to you”?

Are both of the following sentences correct? Let me know if there is still something I need to send to you. Let me know if there is still something I need to send you. Which one is more ...
5
votes
2answers
5k views

“Subject, verb, direct object, object complement” versus “subject, verb, indirect object, direct object”

Reading English Grammar (HarperCollins College Outline, published by HarperResource, an imprint of HarperCollinsPublishers) I found a chapter (Sentence Basics) that explains that in English there are ...