Questions related to the English language as spoken and written in India.

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3answers
71 views

Proper response to “Do the needful”, when the “needful” might not be clearly defined

I have worked in various places where "do the needful" is quite the common idiom. However, in some situations, both parties might not be quite aligned precisely with what falls under the scope of ...
0
votes
1answer
52 views

How might an Indian speaking English understand “two axles spaced not more than 1.2m centres”?

I am currently reading a code of practice called IRC:6-2014, which is the Indian standard for highway loading. It is written in English, but much of the phrasing doesn't scan well for me, as a native ...
4
votes
1answer
41 views

Is the word “dear” used as a word to show affection or for official use in India?

Quite a few times now, from my working with Indians, I've had most of them refer to me as "Dear". A common occurrence is when I am chatting on social media or speaking on the phone. Though where I ...
-1
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0answers
11 views

Linguistics second language learner [on hold]

Is anyone teach me Linguistics? and how I improve my englsh language also.
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0answers
14 views

Which is right to use? [duplicate]

He asked me to do this. or He has asked me to do this. Which one of the above sentence is correct. Give suitable reason.
0
votes
3answers
34 views

Not able to understand the context for “such a reading on the basis of political unity would be inaccurate”

I am an English learner, Could you explain the below statement because i am struggling to understand the context. Considering that such groups have various definitions of separatism and have ...
1
vote
5answers
156 views

Saying meaning “Don't speak unless you can improve silence”

Is there an English equivalent to this familiar saying used in India: Don't speak unless you can improve silence. The saying loosely means it is better to be silent than prattle on about ...
0
votes
1answer
51 views

Is this improper English? [closed]

I was just looking to write articles about freelancing and found one forum where I told about my interest to write articles for their site, I wrote to the author : I have been working as ...
7
votes
5answers
3k views

Cultural connotation of American English — some examples?

I am from India and we speak English there as well, albeit not as culturally refined as I see in the US. In India, and perhaps in the UK, English is spoken in a straight and 'as it is' manner. For ...
4
votes
4answers
1k views

What is the origin of gully and googly in cricket?

The OED supplies no clue to the origin of either gully or googly. It does not in fact mention etymology of the cricket sense of gully, which has led me to infer that it is from the ordinary meaning of ...
1
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2answers
86 views

Why do we say 'Salt to taste'?

Why do we say Salt to taste and don't say salt according to taste or salt for taste?
3
votes
2answers
64 views

Felicitated- pragmatics and connotations

This sentence from a major Indian daily amused me: The mother of a Central Reserve Police Force (CRPF) constable, who died in the line of duty in Jammu and Kashmir, was felicitated at the 65th ...
-1
votes
1answer
50 views

…is/was in debt

I'm really sorry to put the same question through. Let's say I'm narrating a past incident in which one of the sentence is -- "There was a rumor that Citibank is in debt." I'm aware that here 'is' ...
5
votes
8answers
2k views

Usage and meaning of the word “Ragging” in India

This is my first post here on an unwelcome situation in India, described by a word, "Ragging". Wikipedia article states that: "Ragging is a practice similar to hazing in educational institutions. ...
-1
votes
2answers
95 views

Indian English: Is this a correct sentence? [closed]

Is this a correct sentence in Indian English? It is not very long when my sister will finish their graduation.
15
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4answers
2k views

Is the lowercase pronoun “i” a feature of Indian English?

The Rule The personal pronoun “I” is always capitalized in English, regardless of its position in a sentence. This is an orthographic convention that every native speaker should know. Whenever I ...
1
vote
2answers
73 views

Difference between “Putting in one's papers” and “Putting down one's papers”

I have come across these two phrases and both appear to mean almost the same. As mentioned here: Putting in one's paper means voluntary separation from employment. and as I read here: ...
0
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2answers
89 views

Can i know what is the meaning of “Nothing Like That”? [closed]

I asked a person, "Aren't we meeting in next 2 or 3 years?" The person replied saying: "Nothing like that." What does he mean? Will the person will meet me or not?
6
votes
3answers
253 views

Is using “wish” like this exclusive to India?

I'm talking about wish the verb in the following sense only: 1.1 [WITH TWO OBJECTS] Express a hope that (someone) enjoys (happiness or success): they wish her every success As we can see, ...
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votes
1answer
50 views

Is it correct to say “see me please”? [closed]

'See me please.' 'Come for meeting.' 'Let's meet to discuss.' Which one is the right way to ask someone on Skype to meet in person?
2
votes
1answer
65 views

What does “wear shoes” mean in this idiom?

I was reading an article today that used "wear shoes" metaphorically and I have no idea what they're trying to say. The context is an Indian outsourcing company diversifying by using its existing ...
1
vote
2answers
75 views

Are there different words in English language that represent 'our' but one excludes the 2nd party and the other includes it?

I'm from India and in my local language Telugu there are 4 possessive pronouns that represent different combinations of speaker, the 2nd party and the group to which both the parties belong. నా: ...
3
votes
4answers
17k views

What is the correct way to write the statement “Employed from September till date”?

I want to add the following statement in an email: This is being written to confirm that Mr. XYZ has been employed in our organization from September 2013 till date. The "till date" part sounds ...
22
votes
11answers
6k views

Why doesn't the English language have distinct words to use when talking to elders? [closed]

In many of the languages that I've studied there are separate distinctions in the words to use when talking to elders and when talking to someone of your age or younger. For e.g. in Hindi, if I ...
2
votes
1answer
97 views

Meaning of the word Ghāt [closed]

I am a cartographer and am working on a map for a region in northern India. My map source is quite old (1910-1920). There are several named places on the map referring to Ghāts. Many of these named ...
3
votes
5answers
565 views

Expression for becoming homeless, which has the word 'street' in it? How about “pushed to the streets”?

If I lost all my money and became homeless, what standard expression can I use which has the word 'street'? Would it sound perfectly okay to a native English speaker if I said "I was pushed to the ...
2
votes
4answers
212 views

Is “Where do you sit?” correct for asking someone where their workspace is?

At work, if I had to ask someone where exactly they worked, as in where their workspace/cubicle is, what should I say? Is "where do you sit?" the usual thing to say? I'm from India and hear this ...
0
votes
1answer
102 views

How is the letter “Z” pronounced in Indian English?

How is the letter "Z" pronounced in Indian English? I assumed that Indian English is more similar to British English than to American English, and therefore would pronounce it "Zed". But I came ...
0
votes
0answers
29 views

using tell me to mean 'what is it?' [duplicate]

It seems to be a common practice in India to respond to someone's call by saying tell me. It's used even in calls; the conversation goes something like this: Me: Hello Caller : Hello Me: Who's ...
7
votes
3answers
17k views

Meaning of the phrase “put down one's papers”

In India, the phrase "put down one's papers" means to submit one's resignation at a workplace. Is this usage universal? I suspect this is Indian.
4
votes
2answers
294 views

SAT grammar question: Why is this “them” incorrect?

SAT grammar question: There are (more than) 300 million English speakers (in) India, most of (them) acquired English (as) a second language. (No error) The parentheses designate areas where the ...
11
votes
9answers
12k views

Is “non-vegetarian” a correct word?

I've heard that the words "non-veg" and "non-vegetarian" are not legal English words (i.e aren't in the dictionary). Is this true? If so, what is the right way to say that something contains ...
16
votes
3answers
13k views

Saying “today morning” to mean “this morning”

As an American, I use the term this morning, but I’ve noticed some Asian Indian coworkers who always say today morning to mean what I mean by this morning. Is this an Indian English “dialectism”? Is ...
5
votes
1answer
9k views

Is “weightage” an English word?

Is weightage an English word? We use it a lot in India, but I couldn't find it in my Oxford Dictionary.
1
vote
1answer
188 views

Is the perfect aspect used differently in Indian English compared to AmEng and BrEng? [closed]

Some people in India speak English but there's differences. But to what extent does it differ in perfect tenses like present, past, future, etc. perfect? I choose to compare it with British English ...
7
votes
3answers
557 views

Is 'Single Sitting' a proper phrase?

Being an Indian, I don't like the way we Indians use the English. Of course I also make mistakes, but I will try to learn from time to time. I see and hear some phrases like, Please do the needful, ...
12
votes
3answers
598 views

How did Persian words arrive in English?

Some Indian words which have entered modern English, such as 'bazaar' and 'cummerbund', are of Persian origin. So it seems they have completed a journey from Persia to Western India to present-day ...
3
votes
4answers
5k views

'Upgradation' not universally accepted?

While copy-editing an article for a journal, I came across the word 'upgradation' underlined red by MS Word (It's underlined red even as I type it in Chrome). The publishers of the journal recommend ...
0
votes
2answers
69 views

meaning of “haul up”

I read this sentence from the book "REVOLUTION 2020" I remained under a banyan tree, exhausted by my daily ritual of hauling up the men every two hours". I got the meaning for haul up as "to ...
0
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2answers
263 views

Stress shift amongst speakers from India

I've noticed that speakers from India shift the stress in some words such as 'adjective', 'sentence' or 'tendency'. They normally stress the second syllable and not the first one as most people are ...
1
vote
0answers
44 views

Why do speakers from India frequently overuse the phrase “the same”? [duplicate]

In working with overseas teams, as well as with reading text written by speakers from India, I notice a strong overusage of the following types of phrases: Please reply with the same. Kindly ...
0
votes
1answer
85 views

What does “even the keel in favour of ” in the sentence mean?

Even the legal framework that is supposed to provide a modicum of protection to workers is fraying. For instance, the state’s unwillingness to use the provisions of the Industrial Disputes Act or the ...
22
votes
4answers
11k views

Is “prepone” being used outside India?

Prepone is a great word - it's the opposite of postpone. When you prepone a meeting, you change its scheduled time so that it occurs sooner than originally planned. Has his usage spread beyond India? ...
4
votes
3answers
180 views

What is wrong with the usage “We will hold the slot for the next 5 minutes”

Following sentence is from an email template that goes out to our customers. "We will hold the slot for the next 5 minutes" One of the customers said that the sentence should be: "We will ...
6
votes
7answers
13k views

Does “pants” more commonly mean “trousers” or “underpants”?

In the UK, I've heard pants being used as slang for underpants (or was it in Bridget Jones' Diary?), whereas in India it almost exclusively means "trousers". Describing the meaning of "put your pants ...
8
votes
4answers
14k views

“May I know your good name?” [closed]

"May I know your good name” is a typically Indian way of honouring another person by asking their name using an adjective like sweet, good, beautiful, et cetera. Of course there won’t ever be any bad ...
0
votes
2answers
330 views

I'm writing an email to an investor. Please help me to improve my sentences [closed]

I am sending a detailed document about our idea, as requested by an investor. Are the sentences correct? Do they need any improvement? As per our conversation yesterday, I am sending you a ...
4
votes
1answer
807 views

What is the proper pronunciation for Kipling's character-name “Mowgli”?

Does the first syllable rhyme with “glow” or with “how”? It is no use appealing to the Hindi for “Little Frog” or anything else, since Kipling confessed to making ...
3
votes
3answers
1k views

Answering a phone call with “Yes, XX, tell me” [closed]

I have heard a lot of people pick their phone and go "Yes, XX, tell me" (highly used in India). I think the right way should be "Hey, XX, what's up?" or "Hey, XX, what's going on"? But does this work ...
20
votes
2answers
1k views

Why has the word “thrice” fallen out of common usage?

I'm an American living in America, but my workplace has a lot of immigrants from India here. They all use "thrice" very commonly, which is wonderful to my ears! Thrice is such a delightful word. ...