Questions related to the English language as spoken and written in India.

learn more… | top users | synonyms

0
votes
0answers
17 views

English articles are writing Usage? [on hold]

Why a paragraph starts with past tense sentence then remain all sentence should be past tense only?
0
votes
2answers
63 views

One Word : What do you call who chill / relax a lot? [closed]

I need one word for people who chill / party / relax / play games / travel and just chill most of the time. Some Word like 'Freizeit' , but it needs to be used as a noun for persons (eg, traveller, a ...
9
votes
3answers
3k views

Where does the word “snogging” come from?

Where does the word snogging come from, in the sense of canoodling? I’m looking for it etymology, not for its connotation or phonoaesthetic properties, as the answer of the other question provides. ...
1
vote
1answer
61 views

Did “group are” ever make it to Indian English?

Cadbury are reducing the size of their Dairy Milk chocolate blocks Cadbury are CHANGING the recipe for classic Fruit & Nut Why do Indians (now) favour "Cadbury is" over "Cadbury are"? ...
0
votes
0answers
33 views

Can anyone correct my grammar mistakes and sentences? [closed]

My weekend was not good because I had to make my resume till Monday so I was busy with my work, otherwise I had planned to go for a movie with my brother in law but because of my work I cancelled the ...
1
vote
2answers
63 views

Is 'sum' an okay replacement for 'problem'?

I've seen some people using the word sum as a substitute for the word problem, in a mathematical context even though the problem does not explicitly involve the addition operation. For example, We ...
1
vote
1answer
92 views

Difference between “in” and “of” when used with the complement 'the department'

I used the following two expressions: in: students in the department of: students of the department What is the difference, if any, between them?
-1
votes
2answers
42 views

What do we mean by the phrase 'conventions of standard written English' [closed]

A question came and it had one of its options: correct according to conventions of standard English. I don't remember the question but the question was from a grammar section. I do not have an idea ...
0
votes
2answers
52 views

What “appear to be ” means in the given sentence [closed]

Today, while reading a newspaper I came across a sentence that has been baffling me since: The woman, who identified herself as Bhavna and appeared to be in her 20s, .... What does appeared to ...
2
votes
1answer
52 views

Vision Problem vs Visual Problem

I have a problem with those 2 words. What is the difference between the vision problem and visual problem? Or Do they mean the same? I Googled both terms, but the search results are pretty much the ...
6
votes
5answers
1k views

Does the term “mass hero” exist in Western Countries?

"Mass Hero" is a popular term in India, especially down south, which implies an actor who has the versatility to sing, dance, romance, fight, laugh, cry, make the audience laugh and cry, apart from ...
1
vote
1answer
61 views

'Are you really want to quit ?' vs 'Do you really want to quit ?' [closed]

First things first , English is not my Native Language / Mother tongue . I am a game developer . So when a player presses exit button a message pops up and asks whether they want to quit the game or ...
5
votes
2answers
54 views

What does “corn” refer to in English-speaking parts of Asia?

In North America, "corn" refers to the crop some call "maize", Zea mays mays. I'm told that this is the meaning of "corn" in Australia and New Zealand as well. Contrarily, in the British Isles, ...
2
votes
5answers
1k views

Saying meaning “Don't speak unless you can improve silence”

Is there an English equivalent to this familiar saying used in India: Don't speak unless you can improve silence. The saying loosely means it is better to be silent than prattle on about ...
3
votes
3answers
2k views

What is the origin of 'cash'?

What is the etymology of 'cash'? According to the OED when it is used in 'cash-box' it descends from the French 'casse', and presumably Italian 'cassa'. However the word meaning 'loose change' is from ...
3
votes
4answers
27k views

What is the correct way to write the statement “Employed from September till date”?

I want to add the following statement in an email: This is being written to confirm that Mr. XYZ has been employed in our organization from September 2013 till date. The "till date" part sounds ...
7
votes
3answers
392 views

What is the meaning of “Pat came the reply”

I was reading following text from a blog post and I experienced difficulty understanding the phrase - "Pat came the reply". I've searched enough (limited to internet search engine) but I didn't find ...
13
votes
2answers
242 views

Indian English: What usage is allowed for “doubt” (meaning “question”)?

I have a doubt about having a doubt. I learned from this question that in Indian English the word doubt is used to mean question, that is, as a countable noun. If my understanding is correct, the ...
5
votes
2answers
76 views

Is “to do well” used more frequently in India?

When I talk to Indians on line, I have the impression that they use the expression (compound verb?) "to do well" a lot. Is it only an impression of mine, or is that expression more frequently used in ...
3
votes
2answers
1k views

What do you call someone who doesn't know how to swim?

Is there one word for someone who does not know how to swim? Even better if there is one word for someone who doesn't know how to swim but dives to save a drowning person? If no, then suggest a ...
1
vote
2answers
34 views

Why are both blazing or blazingly appropriate?

This SE QA explains that both blazing and blazingly are valid English words (despite what my spell-checker claims). Can anyone explain why they are both valid, and the difference between the words. ...
1
vote
3answers
55 views

Indian spelling: -ize or -ise? [closed]

In Indian spelling, what is the correct suffix, -ize or -ise? E.g. authorized or authorised?
-4
votes
5answers
151 views

What is an alternative to the Indian-English phrase “Nothing like that”? [closed]

This phrase is widely used among Indians. The meaning of this sentence in Hindi translates to "Aisi koi baat nahi". So what could be a suitable grammatically correct sentence for the same? Instance: ...
1
vote
1answer
31 views

Subject verb agreement in Number? [closed]

In the sentence " The Hospitality of the Villagers is to be learnt by all" Why "is" used as verb. why not "are" ? is subject used in this sentence is plural or singular?
8
votes
1answer
808 views

Is the word “dear” used as a word to show affection or for official use in India?

Quite a few times now, from my working with Indians, I've had most of them refer to me as "Dear". A common occurrence is when I am chatting on social media or speaking on the phone. Though where I ...
1
vote
1answer
36 views

Would using the word “only” be correct in this context?

Is it correct to use "only" here? A: The movie was a bore. How did you even tolerate it ?! B: It was good only. The "only" here is used to imply "it wasn't that bad, it was tolerable" This ...
1
vote
2answers
43 views

Correct to use “no?”

Is it considered correct to use "no" like this : I loved the fair. It was fun, no? This is the way people speak in Hindi, so converting it to English literally would not be right I guess.
4
votes
1answer
113 views

Origin of “No, a thousand times no”

I was wondering if the term has Indian origins? I recently came across it in the Animal Farm : "But is this simply part of the order of nature? Is it because this land of ours is so poor that it ...
5
votes
2answers
139 views

“The mixture was added water”: Is “add” a double-object verb?

The mixture was added water. This sentence, written by a non-native speaker, seems somehow odd to me, but I cannot say that I find it at all ambiguous. This example sentence is written by a ...
2
votes
3answers
153 views

Is the phrase 'request you to send the copy' correct?

I read in this website that request should be with that and a clause, not the one with a to-infinitive. In that sense the phrase Request you to send the copy seems to be wrong. If its wrong what would ...
3
votes
3answers
8k views

Choosing between “100%” and “cent percent”

I am a non-native English speaker. I am applying for the USA university for management studies. While writing the essay I came across the sentence, "I was 100% confident." My query: Is it ...
3
votes
1answer
304 views

Origin of the expression “Gone for a toss” in Indian English

I recently heard the expression "gone for a toss", which in Indian English means afaik "broken beyond repair" or "completely out of order". What is the origin of this expression? Is it borrowed from ...
5
votes
1answer
118 views

Origin of the term “top tucker”

In India, at least in the Southern part, there is a phrase "Top tucker" used to compliment/attribute someone for their exceptional qualities/achievements in a colloquial way. The entry Tucker in OED ...
-1
votes
1answer
5k views

Which is correct: I'll be moving next month or I'll be shifting next month?

For changing one's home from one place to another, I've heard people in western part of the world using the sentence: I'll be moving next month. In India, even in the English news channels, ...
1
vote
0answers
63 views

“He could do X for England”. Are there similar expressions in other parts of the English-speaking world to this derogatory sentence?

In Reginald Hill's Dalziel and Pascoe novels, I've read the phrase: "He could [do x] for England. It is always derogatory. It is a lovely phrase! Because I can't put my finger on a quote from these ...
4
votes
1answer
81 views

Why is “to do” replaced by “for doing” in Indian English?

I've come across some articles published by Indian publishers, and there was a sentence that said, Tiwari recalled that during the first meeting with Kalam, Swamiji asked him, “Though you have ...
-2
votes
1answer
116 views

Difference between “I will call to you” and “I will call you”? [closed]

Can anyone pls let me know which is right phrase, 'I will call to you' or 'I will call you' ?
8
votes
3answers
20k views

Meaning of the phrase “put down one's papers”

In India, the phrase "put down one's papers" means to submit one's resignation at a workplace. Is this usage universal? I suspect this is Indian.
2
votes
1answer
68 views

Difference in usage of X's Y and Y of X [duplicate]

Please explain the difference between X's Y and Y of X. Example: "The building's roof" and "roof of the building". Is there a "correct" form? When is the former used and when the latter?
1
vote
1answer
859 views

“Yes, Please” vs “Yes, Of course”

I have heard people saying: Que: Can I use your pen? Ans: Yes please. and also Que: Can I use your pen? Ans: Yes Of course. I wanted to know if there is any difference between these two ...
2
votes
2answers
84 views

Is “to take birth” correct English?

A Google Books search shows many results of the phrase “to take birth” in the sense of “to be born”, but most of them are in books dealing with Eastern philosophies like Hinduism and Buddhism. I am ...
3
votes
3answers
366 views

What is the difference between 'will' and 'would' in question form?

What is the difference in meaning between When will XYZ bank release the results of clerks? When would XYZ Bank release the results of clerks? Please correct the above sentences if ...
6
votes
5answers
2k views

What are the origins of gully and googly in cricket?

The OED supplies no clue to the origin of either gully or googly. It does not in fact mention etymology of the cricket sense of gully, which has led me to infer that it is from the ordinary meaning of ...
2
votes
1answer
56 views

Lost Out of Sky - Local Usage (India) or Typo

I was reading a news story about a jet crash in the UK from a site hosted in India, and I believe the author may also be from there. In it, I saw the sentence: The jet which appeared to have lost ...
0
votes
1answer
253 views

Phrases used to replace“ I think” [closed]

Can anybody suggest phrases or sentences I can use instead of "I think" when it comes to giving opinions Thank you.
1
vote
3answers
58 views

Not able to understand the context for “such a reading on the basis of political unity would be inaccurate”

I am an English learner. Could you explain this statement, because I am struggling to understand the context: Considering that such groups have various definitions of separatism and have ...
18
votes
5answers
3k views

Is the lowercase pronoun “i” a feature of Indian English?

The Rule The personal pronoun “I” is always capitalized in English, regardless of its position in a sentence. This is an orthographic convention that every native speaker should know. Whenever I ...
1
vote
1answer
646 views

What is the differece between “to receiving” and “to receive”?

I am wondering the differece between "to receiving" and "to receive"? I found in many sentences a simple verb or a "ing" after "to". Though I have explore the following, still I am not clear. If the ...
1
vote
3answers
134 views

Proper response to “Do the needful”, when the “needful” might not be clearly defined

I have worked in various places where "do the needful" is quite the common idiom. However, in some situations, both parties might not be quite aligned precisely with what falls under the scope of ...
1
vote
1answer
73 views

How might an Indian speaking English understand “two axles spaced not more than 1.2m centres”?

I am currently reading a code of practice called IRC:6-2014, which is the Indian standard for highway loading. It is written in English, but much of the phrasing doesn't scan well for me, as a native ...