Questions related to the English language as spoken and written in India.

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1answer
36 views

Lost Out of Sky - Local Usage (India) or Typo

I was reading a news story about a jet crash in the UK from a site hosted in India, and I believe the author may also be from there. In it, I saw the sentence: The jet which appeared to have lost ...
0
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1answer
44 views

Phrases used to replace“ I think” [closed]

Can anybody suggest phrases or sentences I can use instead of "I think" when it comes to giving opinions Thank you.
0
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1answer
50 views

What is the differece between “to receiving” and “to receive”?

I am wondering the differece between "to receiving" and "to receive"? I found in many sentences a simple verb or a "ing" after "to". Though I have explore the following, still I am not clear. If the ...
1
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2answers
47 views

Is “to take birth” correct English?

A Google Books search shows many results of the phrase “to take birth” in the sense of “to be born”, but most of them are in books dealing with Eastern philosophies like Hinduism and Buddhism. I am ...
5
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1answer
108 views

Is the word “dear” used as a word to show affection or for official use in India?

Quite a few times now, from my working with Indians, I've had most of them refer to me as "Dear". A common occurrence is when I am chatting on social media or speaking on the phone. Though where I ...
0
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3answers
94 views

Proper response to “Do the needful”, when the “needful” might not be clearly defined

I have worked in various places where "do the needful" is quite the common idiom. However, in some situations, both parties might not be quite aligned precisely with what falls under the scope of ...
0
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1answer
53 views

Is this improper English? [closed]

I was just looking to write articles about freelancing and found one forum where I told about my interest to write articles for their site, I wrote to the author : I have been working as ...
1
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5answers
286 views

Saying meaning “Don't speak unless you can improve silence”

Is there an English equivalent to this familiar saying used in India: Don't speak unless you can improve silence. The saying loosely means it is better to be silent than prattle on about ...
0
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3answers
41 views

Not able to understand the context for “such a reading on the basis of political unity would be inaccurate”

I am an English learner. Could you explain this statement, because I am struggling to understand the context: Considering that such groups have various definitions of separatism and have ...
0
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1answer
55 views

How might an Indian speaking English understand “two axles spaced not more than 1.2m centres”?

I am currently reading a code of practice called IRC:6-2014, which is the Indian standard for highway loading. It is written in English, but much of the phrasing doesn't scan well for me, as a native ...
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2answers
99 views

Why do we say 'Salt to taste'?

Why do we say Salt to taste and don't say salt according to taste or salt for taste?
-1
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1answer
57 views

…is/was in debt

I'm really sorry to put the same question through. Let's say I'm narrating a past incident in which one of the sentence is -- "There was a rumor that Citibank is in debt." I'm aware that here 'is' ...
3
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2answers
77 views

Felicitated- pragmatics and connotations

This sentence from a major Indian daily amused me: The mother of a Central Reserve Police Force (CRPF) constable, who died in the line of duty in Jammu and Kashmir, was felicitated at the 65th ...
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2answers
115 views

Indian English: Is this a correct sentence? [closed]

Is this a correct sentence in Indian English? It is not very long when my sister will finish their graduation.
0
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2answers
101 views

Can i know what is the meaning of “Nothing Like That”? [closed]

I asked a person, "Aren't we meeting in next 2 or 3 years?" The person replied saying: "Nothing like that." What does he mean? Will the person will meet me or not?
6
votes
3answers
267 views

Is using “wish” like this exclusive to India?

I'm talking about wish the verb in the following sense only: 1.1 [WITH TWO OBJECTS] Express a hope that (someone) enjoys (happiness or success): they wish her every success As we can see, ...
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1answer
57 views

Is it correct to say “see me please”? [closed]

'See me please.' 'Come for meeting.' 'Let's meet to discuss.' Which one is the right way to ask someone on Skype to meet in person?
2
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1answer
76 views

What does “wear shoes” mean in this idiom?

I was reading an article today that used "wear shoes" metaphorically and I have no idea what they're trying to say. The context is an Indian outsourcing company diversifying by using its existing ...
1
vote
2answers
104 views

Difference between “Putting in one's papers” and “Putting down one's papers”

I have come across these two phrases and both appear to mean almost the same. As mentioned here: Putting in one's paper means voluntary separation from employment. and as I read here: ...
2
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1answer
117 views

Meaning of the word Ghāt [closed]

I am a cartographer and am working on a map for a region in northern India. My map source is quite old (1910-1920). There are several named places on the map referring to Ghāts. Many of these named ...
17
votes
5answers
2k views

Is the lowercase pronoun “i” a feature of Indian English?

The Rule The personal pronoun “I” is always capitalized in English, regardless of its position in a sentence. This is an orthographic convention that every native speaker should know. Whenever I ...
22
votes
11answers
6k views

Why doesn't the English language have distinct words to use when talking to elders? [closed]

In many of the languages that I've studied there are separate distinctions in the words to use when talking to elders and when talking to someone of your age or younger. For e.g. in Hindi, if I ...
3
votes
5answers
597 views

Expression for becoming homeless, which has the word 'street' in it? How about “pushed to the streets”?

If I lost all my money and became homeless, what standard expression can I use which has the word 'street'? Would it sound perfectly okay to a native English speaker if I said "I was pushed to the ...
2
votes
4answers
285 views

Is “Where do you sit?” correct for asking someone where their workspace is?

At work, if I had to ask someone where exactly they worked, as in where their workspace/cubicle is, what should I say? Is "where do you sit?" the usual thing to say? I'm from India and hear this ...
0
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1answer
113 views

How is the letter “Z” pronounced in Indian English?

How is the letter "Z" pronounced in Indian English? I assumed that Indian English is more similar to British English than to American English, and therefore would pronounce it "Zed". But I came ...
1
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2answers
87 views

Are there different words in English language that represent 'our' but one excludes the 2nd party and the other includes it?

I'm from India and in my local language Telugu there are 4 possessive pronouns that represent different combinations of speaker, the 2nd party and the group to which both the parties belong. నా: ...
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0answers
29 views

using tell me to mean 'what is it?' [duplicate]

It seems to be a common practice in India to respond to someone's call by saying tell me. It's used even in calls; the conversation goes something like this: Me: Hello Caller : Hello Me: Who's ...
4
votes
2answers
325 views

SAT grammar question: Why is this “them” incorrect?

SAT grammar question: There are (more than) 300 million English speakers (in) India, most of (them) acquired English (as) a second language. (No error) The parentheses designate areas where the ...
5
votes
8answers
2k views

Usage and meaning of the word “Ragging” in India

This is my first post here on an unwelcome situation in India, described by a word, "Ragging". Wikipedia article states that: "Ragging is a practice similar to hazing in educational institutions. ...
1
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1answer
193 views

Is the perfect aspect used differently in Indian English compared to AmEng and BrEng? [closed]

Some people in India speak English but there's differences. But to what extent does it differ in perfect tenses like present, past, future, etc. perfect? I choose to compare it with British English ...
7
votes
3answers
574 views

Is 'Single Sitting' a proper phrase?

Being an Indian, I don't like the way we Indians use the English. Of course I also make mistakes, but I will try to learn from time to time. I see and hear some phrases like, Please do the needful, ...
1
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0answers
44 views

Why do speakers from India frequently overuse the phrase “the same”? [duplicate]

In working with overseas teams, as well as with reading text written by speakers from India, I notice a strong overusage of the following types of phrases: Please reply with the same. Kindly ...
0
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1answer
92 views

What does “even the keel in favour of ” in the sentence mean?

Even the legal framework that is supposed to provide a modicum of protection to workers is fraying. For instance, the state’s unwillingness to use the provisions of the Industrial Disputes Act or the ...
4
votes
3answers
190 views

What is wrong with the usage “We will hold the slot for the next 5 minutes”

Following sentence is from an email template that goes out to our customers. "We will hold the slot for the next 5 minutes" One of the customers said that the sentence should be: "We will ...
0
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2answers
382 views

I'm writing an email to an investor. Please help me to improve my sentences [closed]

I am sending a detailed document about our idea, as requested by an investor. Are the sentences correct? Do they need any improvement? As per our conversation yesterday, I am sending you a ...
3
votes
3answers
1k views

Answering a phone call with “Yes, XX, tell me” [closed]

I have heard a lot of people pick their phone and go "Yes, XX, tell me" (highly used in India). I think the right way should be "Hey, XX, what's up?" or "Hey, XX, what's going on"? But does this work ...
0
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2answers
281 views

Stress shift amongst speakers from India

I've noticed that speakers from India shift the stress in some words such as 'adjective', 'sentence' or 'tendency'. They normally stress the second syllable and not the first one as most people are ...
0
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1answer
721 views

Will that be fine?

Quite a few times now, a waiter or shop assistant has asked me: Will that be fine? I've noticed that I've only ever heard Indian English speakers use this turn of phrase. To my (British) ear, ...
0
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0answers
16 views

Purpose of Subjunctive Past [duplicate]

What is exactly a subjunctive past? When do we use it? Could anyone please give some examples of the occasions we use the Subjunctive Past?
0
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1answer
80 views

Usage of too while comparing two places

While in a conversation about a place xyz which is facing water scarcity, if another place abc is also having water scarcity, which sentence would be correct:- I know xyz has water scarcity, but is ...
3
votes
4answers
6k views

'Upgradation' not universally accepted?

While copy-editing an article for a journal, I came across the word 'upgradation' underlined red by MS Word (It's underlined red even as I type it in Chrome). The publishers of the journal recommend ...
0
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1answer
109 views

Pronunciation problem [closed]

I am from India. I am very eager to learn English. So I am used to add some English words with my language. But My friends says that you are having problem with your pronunciation. I tried a lot of ...
0
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3answers
2k views

How to unambiguously refer to someone from India [duplicate]

One can refer to an American Indian as a Native American, but I cannot come up with an unambiguous term for an Indian from the Indian subcontinent. How can I refer to someone who is from the country ...
7
votes
1answer
346 views

“[wh-word] X [verb] Y?” in Indian English

In Indian English, you will often hear constructions like the following: Why Lord Ayyappa isn't a avatar of Lord Mahavishnu? Why each day of the week is dedicated to a particular god? Why lord ...
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2answers
476 views

What's your name? [duplicate]

My question may not be related with English language. It might be more of correct usage. Which one of the following is correct? Your name, please? or Your good name, please? // as if there is a ...
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1answer
198 views

meaning of “little low” [closed]

This is the conversation in the book "Revolution 2020" Hey How are you? I am little low. she said what is the meaning of little low. it means she is unhappy ?
0
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2answers
70 views

meaning of “haul up”

I read this sentence from the book "REVOLUTION 2020" I remained under a banyan tree, exhausted by my daily ritual of hauling up the men every two hours". I got the meaning for haul up as "to ...
4
votes
1answer
885 views

What is the proper pronunciation for Kipling's character-name “Mowgli”?

Does the first syllable rhyme with “glow” or with “how”? It is no use appealing to the Hindi for “Little Frog” or anything else, since Kipling confessed to making ...
2
votes
4answers
114 views

is “merablum” or “merablem” a word?

is there a word "merablum"? maybe "merablem"? It means scrap or remnant of food left on a plate. I always thought it was a word but I googled it and - nothing. Is Google unaware of it or is it a made ...
0
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1answer
127 views

Meaning of “makeshift dias”? [closed]

What is the meaning of makeshift dias in this passage? He had invited over a hundred guests, including members of the press. He addressed everyone from a makeshift dias.