Questions related to the English language as spoken and written in India.

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1
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4answers
138 views

Indian English use of “only” for emphasis

In my dialect of English (American West Coast), the word only exclusively means exclusively. I've worked with folks from Southern India for a while (and used to live abroad in Dubai), and it seems to ...
1
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1answer
61 views

Is the sentence “A lot of resources is available” correct?

I recently came across this sentence : A lot of resources is available: quoted from the webpage http://cheat.errtheblog.com/s/rvm. Since this is a very reputed website, I don't think that can be ...
3
votes
3answers
908 views

Can a female proprietor be called as “proprietor”?

I know the female version of proprietor can be called as proprietress or proprietrix. But I want to know whether a female proprietor can also be called a proprietor? Or does proprietor only indicate ...
5
votes
2answers
172 views

Do people from India consider English their primary language?

I was watching an rerun episode of the Big Bang Theory the other night. And, a character who is from India (Rajesh) is losing an argument, and says: You know if this argument were in my native ...
3
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1answer
210 views

Why is the term “isn't it?” so predominant in Indian English?

I apologize in advance if I am ignorantly and incorrectly assigning this to Indian English. When I was in medical school, I had a number of professors who were native to India. Being a school ...
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2answers
103 views

British and other English variants of 'write to me' - 'write me'' [duplicate]

In British English, the standard is 'write to me'. In American English the standard is 'write me'. Similar variants exist with 'out of the window' and 'out the window'. When did the dropping of ...
0
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2answers
137 views

Is -wala a recognized suffix in Indian English?

Why do we use terms like taxiwala, tongawala and policewala in Indian English? Is -wala a recognized suffix in Indian English?
4
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3answers
678 views

What is the English word for the stones used in Indian weighing balance?

There are stones of 1 kg, 500 grams, 100 grams, or 50 grams used in weighing balance. What are they called in English? These weighting stones are normally used by vegetable vendors.
0
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2answers
484 views

What is the correct way to write the statement “Employed from September till date”?

I want to add the following statement in an email . This is being written to confirm that Mr.XYZ has been employed in our organization from September 2013 till date. The till date part sounds ...
-1
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1answer
131 views

Which is correct: I'll be moving next month or I'll be shifting next month?

For changing one's home from one place to another, I've heard people in western part of the world using the sentence: I'll be moving next month. In India, even in the English news channels, ...
6
votes
2answers
467 views

Where does the word “snogging” come from?

Where does the word snogging come from, in the sense of canoodling? I’m looking for it etymology, not for its connotation or phonoaesthetic properties, as the answer of the other question provides. ...
1
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0answers
36 views

Usage of “The” before a nation name [duplicate]

If USA is referred as "The USA" , why not "The India" ??
0
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2answers
93 views

Who uses the term 'freehold'?

I am interested to discover in which countries, where English is used, the term 'freehold' and 'freeholder' is in everyday use. I know the question of 'freehold' has come up on this site before in ...
1
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2answers
5k views

What should be the proper reply for thanks?

I like a girl which is in same division as I am. Recently she was suffering from malaria and when I came to know this I sent a "Get well soon!" message. We have hardly exchanged any words in labs and ...
0
votes
4answers
1k views

How to make Sentences using Being? [closed]

Sentence - He is being in tension. Above sentence is Present Continuos. How can we use Being in other sentences.
4
votes
5answers
427 views

Is there a word “issual”?

I have used and come across the phrase "issual of tickets" but when recently writing something my Word dictionary tells me that "issual" is not an actual word. Is that the case?
4
votes
3answers
313 views

What is the origin of gully and googly in cricket?

The OED supplies no clue to the origin of either gully or googly. It does not in fact mention etymology of the cricket sense of gully, which has led me to infer that it is from the ordinary meaning of ...
4
votes
2answers
405 views

What is the origin of 'cash'?

What is the etymology of 'cash'? According to the OED when it is used in 'cash-box' it descends from the French 'casse', and presumably Italian 'cassa'. However the word meaning 'loose change' is from ...
8
votes
1answer
249 views

How did Persian words arrive in English?

Some Indian words which have entered modern English, such as 'bazaar' and 'cummerbund', are of Persian origin. So it seems they have completed a journey from Persia to Western India to present-day ...
20
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5answers
1k views

What Indian words appear in cricket's vocabulary?

One of the things I find surprising is that India seems to have had little influence on the vocabulary of cricket. Notwithstanding India being arguably the world's greatest cricketing nation, I can't ...
3
votes
1answer
375 views

Best Dictionary for Indian English

English (India) has evolved over the years. It's being given a separate place of its own since the no. of English-speakers are growing rapidly. An example would be the addition of the option English ...
1
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1answer
369 views

What do you call someone who doesn't know how to swim?

Is there one word for someone who does not know how to swim? Even better if there is one word for someone who doesn't know how to swim but dives to save a drowning person? If no, then suggest a ...
7
votes
5answers
371 views

Word for “invisible god-like voice”

I am Asian and in Asian mythology like epics like Mahabharatha, when some person is going to do something bad then a voice from nowhere comes from background, after a thunder or something, to stop him ...
7
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2answers
6k views

Understand Rudyard Kipling's poem If

I came across Rudyard Kipling's poem If, quoted below: If you can keep your head when all about you Are losing theirs and blaming it on you, If you can trust yourself when all men doubt you, ...
0
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1answer
45 views

How to specify from “this” college in “this” university?

I am confused how to write "B.E. with 80% from this college at this university" in formal language
1
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2answers
995 views

What is the difference between initialize and initiate?

What is the difference between initialize and initiate words? Where should we use and can somebody explain it with some examples.
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1answer
403 views

Ek kaan se suno aur dusre kaan se nikaal do in English proverb? [closed]

I know a Hindi proverb, but I would like to know translation of same in English. How will we say in form of proverb/idiom Not listening or paying attention to the words that come out of your ...
4
votes
3answers
636 views

Use of “the” in Indian English

The word "the" in Indian English seems to have a different function than in American English, and I'd like to understand it better. The first sentence of this article demonstrates what I mean: ...
1
vote
1answer
355 views

Indian English usage of “na” [duplicate]

I have heard a lot of conversations end up in the word "na" mainly among in youth of India. For example: You know naa. You have phone naa. Does this make any sense? Is it a development in ...
1
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2answers
2k views

Is “resign with effect from [date]” inclusive?

I am resigning from my post with effect from 15th April. Does this imply that April 14th will be my last working day, or will it be April 15th?
8
votes
5answers
700 views

Indian English use of “only”

I am from Bangalore and people here tend use the word only to emphasise something in a sentence. For example: We are getting that only printed. What is the proper way to put it?
2
votes
2answers
332 views

Is “stepmother treatment” Indian English?

When I googled stepmother treatment, I found that it was mainly used in India to refer to neglect, disregard or inattention. Most of the other non-Indian links talked about the literal treatment by ...
-1
votes
2answers
840 views

Difference between “anyone” and “everyone”? [duplicate]

What's the difference between anyone and everyone? Everyone should keep quiet in the classroom. Anyone should keep quiet in the classroom.
2
votes
2answers
3k views

Why is it wrong to use “The India” [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: Using the definite article before a country/state name We say “The United States of America” but not “The India”. Why is it so?
5
votes
5answers
742 views

She was carrying twins and a bulky bag in her hands [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: Using verbs with multiple meanings I am not sure if this is Indian English but the verb carry is often used in India to speak of a pregnant woman and often without an ...
2
votes
4answers
3k views

“May I know your good name?” [closed]

“May I know your good name” is a typically Indian way of honouring the other person (who is previously unknown) by asking their name using an adjective like sweet, good, beautiful, et cetera — and of ...
3
votes
3answers
32k views

Can “casted” be the past tense of “cast”?

'The Hindu,' an Indian daily, reports: Leader of Opposition in Rajya Sabha Arun Jaitely casted his vote at Chimanbhai Patel Institute opposite Karnavati club. Does the verb cast has a form as ...
7
votes
3answers
1k views

When to use nah or right in a sentence

When I was chatting with my friend, as a part of our conversation I used a phrase. "You have laptop nah." He replied, first try to change your English, it sounds ridiculous, using words nah, right. ...
6
votes
2answers
507 views

Indian legal documents

I am a resident of India. I have never been able to understand the language used in the legal documents here. Below is an example from an agreement to sell an apartment. Herein after referred to ...
1
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2answers
17k views

“What day is it today?” vs. “What day is today?”

Which of the following is grammatical? What date/day is it today? What date/day is today?
7
votes
1answer
236 views

Does “tapall” or “tappies” mean “mail” in English?

I had been wondering about a non-native word in Tamil: Thabal, meaning post. This word has origins from elsewhere, and I had not been able to figure out the etymology. Searches in Internet had also ...
3
votes
5answers
22k views

Difference between “Thanking you” and “Thank you”?

I always use in my letter "Thanking you in advance for your time and consideration." But one of my colleagues said thanking you was not correct usage of English, it should be thank you. So my ...
0
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1answer
303 views

Please provide me correct interpretation of this sentence [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: How does negation affect the use and understanding of “or” and “and” A's girlfriend doesn't like movies or Roses. What would be the correct ...
-1
votes
4answers
169 views

Is “class Xth” instead of “class X” ok?

Many people say, e.g., "Class Xth," "Category Xth," "Part Xth," "Street Xth," instead of "Class X," "Category X," "Part X," "Street X," respectively. Is the former right?
4
votes
1answer
201 views

Parenthetical commas and foreign English

I advise a friend on her writing, despite not quite knowing an adverb from a proverb (kidding (kinda)). Invariably, parenthetical commas such as the following: Jane, my assistant, opened the ...
4
votes
4answers
2k views

“Wednesday week”

I know that the English will say "Wednesday week" to mean a week from Wednesday. Is there a name for this sort of construction? Also, I have a friend from India who will say "today morning". Is ...
3
votes
2answers
566 views

Usage of the word “latest”

Raj has breakfast almost always before 7:45 AM. On rare occasions, he has after 7:45 AM, but never after 8:00 AM. So If he says "I always have my breakfast latest by 8:00 AM" to convey this fact, is ...
0
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4answers
497 views

What's the Australian or British way to say 'Ticket collector'? [closed]

I know Indians say ticket collectors while in Australia people are confused with this phrase. Please let me know how you would say that.
3
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2answers
416 views

Is “learning yourself” the same as “learning by yourself”?

(Other than the first also meaning to learn about oneself...) Is learning yourself the same as learning by yourself? How much do these two phrases differ? In India's spoken English, the former is ...
1
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2answers
411 views

How could I explain this situation in email? [closed]

My PM given me project and told me develop new project using existing code, but existing project is not good written. I mean they written very difficult code for very simple things. I am quiet ...