An article is a word that combines with a noun to indicate the type of reference being made by the noun.

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Should I use “a” or “an”? [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: When should I use “a” vs “an”? Which one of the the following is correct? a F-test an F-test The F-test is pronounced as "ef test".
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78 views

Should I use `a SSTP` or `an SSTP`? [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: Do you use “a” or “an” before acronyms? First of all let me clarify that SSTP is an abbreviation of a technical term. I want to know, when using ...
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4answers
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Why does English have an indefinite article? [closed]

I've seen many non-native speakers of English not making use of indefinite articles, presumably since their first language did not contain them. Thinking about this, and about the fact that even in ...
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3answers
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Why do we use plural for indefinite objects?

Building off another question I answered here, I couldn't justify why exactly we say: I like to ride bicycles. Instead of: I like to ride a bicycle. (This could be anything: "climb mountains", ...
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3answers
615 views

Using “a” vs “an” with 'very'

I've just read from a comment somewhere that 'a very emotional' is grammatically wrong, and it should be 'an very emotional'. Why is 'very' ignored in this case? If it should be ignored, are there any ...
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Dialog with an ok and cancel button

I'd be interested in your analysis of the following sentence (from program documentation): ... dialog with an ok and cancel button... [correct] Would be correct. However, why not: ... dialog ...
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8answers
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Why is there no plural indefinite article?

The takes either a singular or a plural subject. A/an only takes the singular. When we pluralize a noun preceded by an indefinite article, we simply drop the article (sometimes replacing it with ...
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1answer
276 views

Correct English: “An L.V.” or “a L.V.”? [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: “a” or “an” for words that don't start with vowels but sound like they're starting with a vowel Do you use “a” or “an” before acronyms? Does one use 'a' or ...
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2answers
152 views

A MPR vs AN MPR [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: Do you use “a” or “an” before acronyms? I searched google for "a MPR" and "an MPR". The first one returns about 52000 hits while the second one ...
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1answer
131 views

Why don't we use the indefinite article in “what hassle”?

Why don't we use the indefinite article in "what hassle"? I think hassle is used as noun here which means "Irritating or inconvenience". What exactly is the problem with "what a hassle" (as hassle is ...
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2answers
5k views

A or an XML report? [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: Do you use “a” or “an” before acronyms? Does one use 'a' or 'an' before the word 'X-Ray'? Quite simply, should a sentence read "a XML report" ...
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3answers
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What is the difference between “little” and “a little”?

I would like to know how these two words differ in usage. Which one is singular? Which one is plural? I would greatly appreciate if you could provide me with a sample usage of these phrases.
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“I wrote a (albeit very rough) draft” or “I wrote an (albeit very rough) draft” [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: “a/an” preceding a parenthetical statement Does the parenthetical phrase change the "a" to an "an"? If you remove the parenthetical phrase, then you'd ...
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1answer
187 views

“a” or “an” in this situation? [duplicate]

Possible Duplicates: “A” vs. “An” in writing vs. pronunciation Use of “a” versus “an” I know that "an" should be used when a word is ...
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3answers
823 views

Is it correct to say “one out of *a* possible four”?

I am curious if it is correct to say "one out of a possible four". This is what I found in a publication: Discrete level (one out of a possible four), corresponding to a range of safety ...
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2answers
973 views

Should it be “a established” or “an established”? [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: Use of “a” versus “an” I have always been using a established. The CPM is a established theory that explains......... But when reading ...
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638 views

How did the definite / indefinite articles develop? [closed]

Russian, I believe, has no definite or indefinite article. How did it develop in Latin languages, particularly English? Would English be much poorer without it?
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which is correct “a ear” or “an ear”, conversely “a year” or “an year” [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: Which is correct- “A Year” or “An Year”? Use of “a” versus “an” A(n) ear vs. a(n) year in speaking is very confusing, please clarify.
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What is the rule for using “a” or “an” in a sentence? [duplicate]

Possible Duplicates: “A user” or “an user”? Use of “a” versus “an” If I remember correctly back to my school days, the rule is to use "a" ...
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1answer
355 views

Does turning a noun into an acronym always change its indefinite article (a/an)? [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: Do you use “a” or “an” before acronyms? Take "StackExchange" and its acronym, SE, as an example: I read a StackExchange thread the other day ...
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2answers
136 views

“A first post” — makes sense or not?

I once knew a person who titled the first post in his blog, "A first post." It was immediately pointed out to him that correct usage is "The first post." To that he responded: Well, every blog has ...
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Definite or indefinite article in “the/a devil's advocate”

I can't quite figure out which of the following expressions is more correct: He is the devil's advocate. He is a devil's advocate. He is playing devil's advocate. The combination of an article ...
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Which is correct: To “take a medical leave” or to “take medical leave”?

According to the Oxford Advanced Learner's Dictionary and Cambridge Dictionaries Online, leave is an uncountable noun when it is used to mean "a period of time away from work for a holiday/vacation or ...
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4answers
217 views

Should I use the article 'a' here? Or nothing at all?

Which variant is better? We have a chance to get new experience talking to new people. or We have a chance to get a new experience talking to new people.
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35k views

“To have a dinner” vs “to have dinner”: which one is correct?

Does one need to use the article in this case?
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Usage of “an” before nouns beginning with an “h” where that “h” is not silent [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: “A historic…” or “An historic…”? Such as an heinous crime an hideous monstrosity an hallucination This always looks wrong to ...
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668 views

“A user” or “an user”? [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: Use of “a” versus “an” “A” becomes “an” before a word beginning with a vowel, does this apply to “u”? Is it “a ...
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1answer
158 views

“Perhaps, some bird lives in there” or “perhaps, a bird lives in there?”

Imagine yourself walking in the woods with children. One child is saying, "there is a big hole in that tree's trunk." You answer, "perhaps a/some bird lives in there." Would you use a or some? ...
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4answers
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“An RV” or “a RV”? [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: Do you use “a” or “an” before acronyms? I am writing about Random Variables, which I am abbreviating to RV. Should I write 'an RV' (an Arr-Vee) ...
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4answers
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“As part of” versus “as a part of”

When should I use "as part of", and when "as a part of"?
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2answers
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Why don't we use the indefinite article with 'software'?

Generally, one doesn't use the indefinite article with a noun because it's plural, but sometimes you get nouns where, for some reason, the indefinite article isn't used even though the noun is ...
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5answers
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Which is correct — “a year” or “an year”? [duplicate]

The word year when pronounced starts with a phonetic sound of e which is a vowel sound making it eligible for being preceded by an. Yet, we tend to write a year. Why?
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“such a day” or “such day”?

It's such a nice day today! I'm interested in the usage of the indefinite article. I know this sentence is correct. We use an indefinite article in exclamations with countable nouns. But the ...
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Article in “having (a) hard time”

What's the difference? I'm having hard time figuring that out I'm having a hard time figuring that out According to Google both are used equally often. Does the article change meaning here? ...
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“An RPG” or “a RPG”? [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: When should I use “a” vs “an”? Do you use “a” or “an” before acronyms? Does one use 'a' or 'an' before the word X-Ray? Hello people, English is not ...
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2answers
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Can I start a sentence with a singular noun with no article?

For example, which one of the following sentences can I use? Consumer of Product X needs to fill out a rebate form […]. Consumers of Product X need to […]. A consumer of Product X needs to ...
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347 views

Is it “comedy” or “a comedy”?

For example in this sentence, do we need an article before comedy? Improv is essentially [a] comedy.
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2answers
1k views

Indefinite article in the “An [adjective] [number] [plural noun]” construction

I wasn't sure how best to phrase the title of this question. I'm interested in constructions of the following form: An estimated 50 people died in the bombing. 'An estimated' could be ...
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1answer
330 views

Is panda “a kind of a bear” or “a kind of bear”?

Or, perhaps, it's not a kind at all? A type maybe?
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“A heroic” or “An heroic”? [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: “A historic…” or “An historic…”? I have heard and read this combination both ways: It was a heroic act. It was an heroic act. ...
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6answers
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Does one use 'a' or 'an' before the word X-Ray?

I was asking this question on Area 51: "How do I tell if an airport scanner is a X-ray scanner?", but I keep wanting to put an 'an' in front of X-ray because it starts with the 'eh' sound. So is it ...
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3answers
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“The (Cobra)” vs. “An (elephant)”, articles with nouns denoting a class

[ 1 ] tells on p.5 that "Singular nouns denoting a class" are preceded by the definite article "THE" (Example: "The Cobra is dangerous"), while on page 7 (Table 6. THE INDEFINITE ARTICLE) it tells ...
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“A” or “an” with words beginning with the letter H [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: “A historic…” or “An historic…”? I am wondering when it's correct to use a/an with words beginning with the letter h. For example: ...
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2answers
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Is pronouncing “The” as in “Thee” still correct in titles?

When saying the title of JRR Tolkien's masterpiece, which is the correct pronunciation (Yes, I know that they're spelled wrong, but I'm trying to emphasize the pronunciation): Thuh Lord of thuh ...
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0answers
179 views

A becomes an before a word beginning with a vowel, does this apply to u? [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: Use of “a” versus “an” Is it “a uniform” or “an uniform” In spoken English we do say: He is an unhappy person But I ...
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4answers
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Is it “a uniform” or “an uniform”? [duplicate]

On a Physics specification, it says: 6.7 Know how to use two permanent magnets to produce a uniform magnetic field pattern. Isn't it "produce an uniform magnetic field", or is the existing ...
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2answers
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Is It More Appropriate To Use “One” or “You” When Speaking Of An Indefinite Person?

In high school English, it was imparted to us that in formal American English when speaking about an indefinite party, we should use the word one. For example, "One should cover his or her mouth when ...
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10answers
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“A/An” preceding a parenthetical statement

When a/an precedes a parenthetical aside (sometimes seen in informal/conversational writing), should the vowel rule depend on the first word in parentheses, or the next word in the "regular" flow of ...
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2answers
129 views

“Ate cheeseburger” or “ate a cheeseburger”?

Which of the following is correct? Ate a cheese burger last night. Ate cheese burger last night.
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1answer
932 views

Silent 'h' words [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: When to use 'an' and when to use 'a' with words begining with 'h'? Which words starting with 'h' need "an"?