Tagged Questions

An article is a word that combines with a noun to indicate the type of reference being made by the noun.

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2
votes
6answers
892 views

“Suffer from a headache” vs. “suffer from the headache” [closed]

I am not sure which article to use in the following context: She has been suffering from a headache. She has been suffering from the headache. Please clear up my doubt.
0
votes
2answers
291 views

Why the indefinite article in “have a good time”?

Why do we use the indefinite article in the expression "have a good time"? Time is an uncountable noun, and we never say "what a beautiful weather!", but "what beautiful weather it is!" Could ...
4
votes
1answer
3k views

Everyone Else's Lives

It would seem as though this is incorrect, since we each only have one life. Is my intuition correct that it should be everyone else's life and not everyone else's lives?
-1
votes
2answers
2k views

“Go on excursion” vs. “go on an excursion” [closed]

Is it grammatical to say, "The class is going on excursion"? My thought is that it would be preferable to say "The class is going on an excursion". My colleague thinks that the first sentence is ...
1
vote
3answers
529 views

“a href ” or “an href ” [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: Is it supposed to be a HTML or an HTML When should I use “a” versus “an” in front of a word beginning with the letter h? How does one correctly pronounce the letter 'H': ...
1
vote
2answers
3k views

“It is bad practice …” vs. “It is a bad practice …”

"At work, it is bad practice to go to lunch early." "At work, it is a bad practice to go to lunch early." The noun "practice" is both countable and uncountable. So, could both sentences be ...
-5
votes
0answers
172 views

What indefinite article (“a” or “an”) should be used before “x” [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: Does one use 'a' or 'an' before the word X-Ray? I understand that the decision between "a" and "an" is generally based on what vowel sound the following ...
2
votes
2answers
4k views

“A hundred percent” vs. “hundred percent”

Which sentence is grammatically correct: I'm a hundred percent sure I'm hundred percent sure Any help would be greatly appreciated!
5
votes
2answers
3k views

Difference between “change is constant” and “change is a constant”

The boss asked me the other day whether it's more correct to say In our business, change is constant. or In our business, change is a constant. Both of these sound perfectly correct to me, ...
3
votes
1answer
134 views

“Professor of entomology” or “a professor of entomology”

Which is correct? This is Dr. Yang Jeng-Tze, professor of entomology. This is Dr. Yang Jeng-Tze, a professor of entomology.
6
votes
3answers
2k views

a cold vs flu / the flu

Have you got a cold? Have you got flu? Have you got the flu? Why can't we say a flu or the cold in the previous examples?
9
votes
2answers
820 views

Are there specific rules to build expressions with or without articles?

In English, there are lots of expressions built using articles like: at the station to the cinema play the piano have breakfast (no article) take a bath take a shower Are there specific rules or ...
0
votes
1answer
158 views

Article or no article: “at the price of a higher workload”?

The finer points (the infamous 10%?) of when to use indefinite articles still manage to elude me sometimes. Does the article "a" belong in the following sentence or not? However, [foo] yields ...
1
vote
0answers
27 views

Using `an` before consonants [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: Why shouldn't we say “an user”? I've personally seen the indefinite article an coming before consonants in many places whereas I think that should be a ...
3
votes
2answers
574 views

Phrasing of “What knowledge is required [at/in] [a] university?”

In British English, how should I properly write a sentence like What knowledge is required at university? Basically, I want to ask what knowledge is required for study at a university or in a ...
0
votes
2answers
1k views

When to use inverted word-order like “great an option”? [closed]

I heard this in a movie yesterday: That is great an option! Why didn't he say: That is a great option! How does grammar desribe such inverted phrases? Where should I use this inverted ...
-3
votes
1answer
2k views

The <noun> of <noun>

I wonder about the the <noun> of <noun> template. For example, the customers of a movie theater or the possessor of a car. The question is "Is it a stable rule in English to put "the" ...
1
vote
0answers
65 views

How to properly use brackets and articles when the article is changed by the bracketed word? [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: “A/An” preceding a parenthetical statement I was just posting a question on another Stack Exchange website. And I ran into the following sentence: How do ...
6
votes
3answers
4k views

How many articles should go in “Merry Christmas and Happy New Year!”?

On the very first Christmas card it was written as "A Merry Christmas and a Happy New Year..." http://www.phrases.org.uk/meanings/christmas-card-sayings-and-phrases.html In Wiktionary that same ...
4
votes
1answer
489 views

Origin of distinction between “one” and “a/an”?

So I was told that the English articles "a" and "an" have Germanic origins. In German, there is not a distinction between "one" and "a/an". Is there any explanation for the existence of these two ...
5
votes
2answers
534 views

Indefinite Article Preceding Noun “Wind”

It's common to say "a gentle wind", but is it OK to say "a wind"? I just noticed that there's a novel named "A Wind in the Door", in which case I guess "A" could be used here due to the modifying "in ...
12
votes
4answers
1k views

Why is it “an yearly”?

In the book The Wealth of Nations, (Adam Smith, 1776), the words an yearly are used. Why was this an exception to the indefinite article rules? Chapter VI, Book I: At the rate of ten per cent ...
1
vote
0answers
79 views

Should I use “a” or “an”? [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: When should I use “a” vs “an”? Which one of the the following is correct? a F-test an F-test The F-test is pronounced as "ef test".
0
votes
0answers
77 views

Should I use `a SSTP` or `an SSTP`? [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: Do you use “a” or “an” before acronyms? First of all let me clarify that SSTP is an abbreviation of a technical term. I want to know, when using ...
8
votes
4answers
1k views

Why does English have an indefinite article? [closed]

I've seen many non-native speakers of English not making use of indefinite articles, presumably since their first language did not contain them. Thinking about this, and about the fact that even in ...
5
votes
3answers
1k views

Why do we use plural for indefinite objects?

Building off another question I answered here, I couldn't justify why exactly we say: I like to ride bicycles. Instead of: I like to ride a bicycle. (This could be anything: "climb mountains", ...
2
votes
3answers
417 views

Using “a” vs “an” with 'very'

I've just read from a comment somewhere that 'a very emotional' is grammatically wrong, and it should be 'an very emotional'. Why is 'very' ignored in this case? If it should be ignored, are there any ...
3
votes
4answers
263 views

Dialog with an ok and cancel button

I'd be interested in your analysis of the following sentence (from program documentation): ... dialog with an ok and cancel button... [correct] Would be correct. However, why not: ... dialog ...
36
votes
8answers
4k views

Why is there no plural indefinite article?

The takes either a singular or a plural subject. A/an only takes the singular. When we pluralize a noun preceded by an indefinite article, we simply drop the article (sometimes replacing it with ...
0
votes
1answer
232 views

Correct English: “An L.V.” or “a L.V.”? [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: “a” or “an” for words that don't start with vowels but sound like they're starting with a vowel Do you use “a” or “an” before acronyms? Does one use 'a' or ...
0
votes
2answers
132 views

A MPR vs AN MPR [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: Do you use “a” or “an” before acronyms? I searched google for "a MPR" and "an MPR". The first one returns about 52000 hits while the second one ...
-5
votes
1answer
121 views

Why don't we use the indefinite article in “what hassle”?

Why don't we use the indefinite article in "what hassle"? I think hassle is used as noun here which means "Irritating or inconvenience". What exactly is the problem with "what a hassle" (as hassle is ...
5
votes
2answers
4k views

A or an XML report? [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: Do you use “a” or “an” before acronyms? Does one use 'a' or 'an' before the word 'X-Ray'? Quite simply, should a sentence read "a XML report" ...
2
votes
3answers
8k views

What is the difference between “little” and “a little”?

I would like to know how these two words differ in usage. Which one is singular? Which one is plural? I would greatly appreciate if you could provide me with a sample usage of these phrases.
1
vote
0answers
95 views

“I wrote a (albeit very rough) draft” or “I wrote an (albeit very rough) draft” [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: “a/an” preceding a parenthetical statement Does the parenthetical phrase change the "a" to an "an"? If you remove the parenthetical phrase, then you'd ...
1
vote
1answer
148 views

“a” or “an” in this situation? [duplicate]

Possible Duplicates: “A” vs. “An” in writing vs. pronunciation Use of “a” versus “an” I know that "an" should be used when a word is ...
8
votes
3answers
709 views

Is it correct to say “one out of *a* possible four”?

I am curious if it is correct to say "one out of a possible four". This is what I found in a publication: Discrete level (one out of a possible four), corresponding to a range of safety ...
1
vote
2answers
778 views

Should it be “a established” or “an established”? [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: Use of “a” versus “an” I have always been using a established. The CPM is a established theory that explains......... But when reading ...
2
votes
0answers
537 views

How did the definite / indefinite articles develop? [closed]

Russian, I believe, has no definite or indefinite article. How did it develop in Latin languages, particularly English? Would English be much poorer without it?
0
votes
0answers
455 views

which is correct “a ear” or “an ear”, conversely “a year” or “an year” [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: Which is correct- “A Year” or “An Year”? Use of “a” versus “an” A(n) ear vs. a(n) year in speaking is very confusing, please clarify.
1
vote
1answer
6k views

What is the rule for using “a” or “an” in a sentence? [duplicate]

Possible Duplicates: “A user” or “an user”? Use of “a” versus “an” If I remember correctly back to my school days, the rule is to use "a" ...
0
votes
1answer
303 views

Does turning a noun into an acronym always change its indefinite article (a/an)? [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: Do you use “a” or “an” before acronyms? Take "StackExchange" and its acronym, SE, as an example: I read a StackExchange thread the other day ...
0
votes
2answers
132 views

“A first post” — makes sense or not?

I once knew a person who titled the first post in his blog, "A first post." It was immediately pointed out to him that correct usage is "The first post." To that he responded: Well, every blog has ...
7
votes
2answers
706 views

Definite or indefinite article in “the/a devil's advocate”

I can't quite figure out which of the following expressions is more correct: He is the devil's advocate. He is a devil's advocate. He is playing devil's advocate. The combination of an article ...
3
votes
2answers
471 views

Which is correct: To “take a medical leave” or to “take medical leave”?

According to the Oxford Advanced Learner's Dictionary and Cambridge Dictionaries Online, leave is an uncountable noun when it is used to mean "a period of time away from work for a holiday/vacation or ...
1
vote
4answers
195 views

Should I use the article 'a' here? Or nothing at all?

Which variant is better? We have a chance to get new experience talking to new people. or We have a chance to get a new experience talking to new people.
1
vote
1answer
25k views

“To have a dinner” vs “to have dinner”: which one is correct?

Does one need to use the article in this case?
0
votes
2answers
594 views

Usage of “an” before nouns beginning with an “h” where that “h” is not silent [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: “A historic…” or “An historic…”? Such as an heinous crime an hideous monstrosity an hallucination This always looks wrong to ...
0
votes
0answers
655 views

“A user” or “an user”? [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: Use of “a” versus “an” “A” becomes “an” before a word beginning with a vowel, does this apply to “u”? Is it “a ...
3
votes
1answer
151 views

“Perhaps, some bird lives in there” or “perhaps, a bird lives in there?”

Imagine yourself walking in the woods with children. One child is saying, "there is a big hole in that tree's trunk." You answer, "perhaps a/some bird lives in there." Would you use a or some? ...