An article is a word that combines with a noun to indicate the type of reference being made by the noun.

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“In a book store near my school” vs. “in the book store near my school” [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: Are there any simple rules for article usage (“a” vs “the” vs none) Which article should I use in the following situations? There is only one book store near my ...
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1answer
1k views

When using “an” before a vowel sounds wrong [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: When should I use “a” vs “an”? Do you use “a” or “an” before acronyms? Consider the following sentence: "This is a one-time deal" sounds right "This is an one-time ...
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2answers
1k views

Usage of English definite article when referring to generic word

My mother language does not have articles, so I still struggle to choose when to use the indefinte and definite article. The other day, I learned: "The dog is an animal" is acceptable. "The iron is ...
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37 views

“a” vs. “an” when the following word is in a bracket [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: “A/An” preceding a parenthetical statement Let's say I send a text to someone saying: Can you get me a coffee? Over here, I use a as the following word doesn't ...
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3answers
460 views

What article should be used in such sentences?

What article should be used in the following sentence? He was English by [a/the/] blood. I feel there should be a zero article here, but I was taught that the zero article is impossible in ...
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2answers
113 views

Is “a” mandatory in “I'm a whole new (Name)”?

Let's say, your name is Kate and you say "I'm a whole new Kate!" Now, can you drop "a" and say "I'm whole new Kate!"? Or is it mandatory to keep it?
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1answer
227 views

“You're too clever a man”

You're too clever a man to imagine this. The above sentence was said by George Galloway, a man of excellent rhetorical skills. Since he said it, I doubt it's wrong, grammatically. But, I wonder ...
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5answers
2k views

“Is of the view that” vs. “is of a view that” [closed]

Is there any significant difference in the meanings of sentence 1 and sentence 2 below? Mr. Jones is of a view that the project is unnecessary. Mr. Jones is of the view that the project is ...
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3answers
259 views

Why is it “A president,” not “The president” in the sentence, “Voters re-elected a president who promised to fight for …”?

The New York Times article (November 9) titled, “The Fiscal Cliff Opener” begins with the following sentence. “On Tuesday, voters re-elected a president who promised to fight for higher taxes on ...
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2answers
185 views

Negatives with “a” or “any”

Are both these sentences correct? There isn’t a cat in the kitchen. There isn’t any cat in the kitchen.
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3answers
468 views

“A different one” when we have 3 objects - other/another? [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: Can “another” be used with plural nouns provided periods or measurements don’t count? Here is the context (found in a forum for learners of English) WAITRESS: Do you ...
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0answers
35 views

Indefinite article for words starting with “E” An/A Ensemble [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: When should I use “a” vs “an”? which article should be used with the words which start with the letter "E" such as "Ensemble" ?
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1answer
937 views

Repetition of articles in a sentence

The following sentences use more than one adjective for a single noun. She has a black and white cat. It implies that the person involved here has only one cat which is black and white coloured. ...
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2answers
162 views

“White” vs. “a white” vs. “a white person”

Should I say that "Will is white" or "Will is a white" or "Will is a white person" to refer to his race? Also, is it considered acceptable to say someone is black or white in a college paper?
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6answers
652 views

“Suffer from a headache” vs. “suffer from the headache” [closed]

I am not sure which article to use in the following context: She has been suffering from a headache. She has been suffering from the headache. Please clear up my doubt.
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2answers
206 views

Why the indefinite article in “have a good time”?

Why do we use the indefinite article in the expression "have a good time"? Time is an uncountable noun, and we never say "what a beautiful weather!", but "what beautiful weather it is!" Could ...
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1answer
2k views

Everyone Else's Lives

It would seem as though this is incorrect, since we each only have one life. Is my intuition correct that it should be everyone else's life and not everyone else's lives?
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2answers
1k views

“Go on excursion” vs. “go on an excursion” [closed]

Is it grammatical to say, "The class is going on excursion"? My thought is that it would be preferable to say "The class is going on an excursion". My colleague thinks that the first sentence is ...
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3answers
353 views

“a href ” or “an href ” [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: Is it supposed to be a HTML or an HTML When should I use “a” versus “an” in front of a word beginning with the letter h? How does one correctly pronounce the letter 'H': ...
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2answers
2k views

“It is bad practice …” vs. “It is a bad practice …”

"At work, it is bad practice to go to lunch early." "At work, it is a bad practice to go to lunch early." The noun "practice" is both countable and uncountable. So, could both sentences be ...
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0answers
167 views

What indefinite article (“a” or “an”) should be used before “x” [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: Does one use 'a' or 'an' before the word X-Ray? I understand that the decision between "a" and "an" is generally based on what vowel sound the following ...
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2answers
3k views

“A hundred percent” vs. “hundred percent”

Which sentence is grammatically correct: I'm a hundred percent sure I'm hundred percent sure Any help would be greatly appreciated!
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2answers
3k views

Difference between “change is constant” and “change is a constant”

The boss asked me the other day whether it's more correct to say In our business, change is constant. or In our business, change is a constant. Both of these sound perfectly correct to me, ...
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1answer
128 views

“Professor of entomology” or “a professor of entomology”

Which is correct? This is Dr. Yang Jeng-Tze, professor of entomology. This is Dr. Yang Jeng-Tze, a professor of entomology.
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3answers
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a cold vs flu / the flu

Have you got a cold? Have you got flu? Have you got the flu? Why can't we say a flu or the cold in the previous examples?
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2answers
686 views

Are there specific rules to build expressions with or without articles?

In English, there are lots of expressions built using articles like: at the station to the cinema play the piano have breakfast (no article) take a bath take a shower Are there specific rules or ...
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1answer
151 views

Article or no article: “at the price of a higher workload”?

The finer points (the infamous 10%?) of when to use indefinite articles still manage to elude me sometimes. Does the article "a" belong in the following sentence or not? However, [foo] yields ...
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0answers
26 views

Using `an` before consonants [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: Why shouldn't we say “an user”? I've personally seen the indefinite article an coming before consonants in many places whereas I think that should be a ...
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2answers
496 views

Phrasing of “What knowledge is required [at/in] [a] university?”

In British English, how should I properly write a sentence like What knowledge is required at university? Basically, I want to ask what knowledge is required for study at a university or in a ...
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2answers
980 views

When to use inverted word-order like “great an option”? [closed]

I heard this in a movie yesterday: That is great an option! Why didn't he say: That is a great option! How does grammar desribe such inverted phrases? Where should I use this inverted ...
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1answer
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The <noun> of <noun>

I wonder about the the <noun> of <noun> template. For example, the customers of a movie theater or the possessor of a car. The question is "Is it a stable rule in English to put "the" ...
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0answers
64 views

How to properly use brackets and articles when the article is changed by the bracketed word? [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: “A/An” preceding a parenthetical statement I was just posting a question on another Stack Exchange website. And I ran into the following sentence: How do ...
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3answers
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How many articles should go in “Merry Christmas and Happy New Year!”?

On the very first Christmas card it was written as "A Merry Christmas and a Happy New Year..." http://www.phrases.org.uk/meanings/christmas-card-sayings-and-phrases.html In Wiktionary that same ...
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1answer
425 views

Origin of distinction between “one” and “a/an”?

So I was told that the English articles "a" and "an" have Germanic origins. In German, there is not a distinction between "one" and "a/an". Is there any explanation for the existence of these two ...
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Indefinite Article Preceding Noun “Wind”

It's common to say "a gentle wind", but is it OK to say "a wind"? I just noticed that there's a novel named "A Wind in the Door", in which case I guess "A" could be used here due to the modifying "in ...
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4answers
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Why is it “an yearly”?

In the book The Wealth of Nations, (Adam Smith, 1776), the words an yearly are used. Why was this an exception to the indefinite article rules? Chapter VI, Book I: At the rate of ten per cent ...
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0answers
77 views

Should I use “a” or “an”? [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: When should I use “a” vs “an”? Which one of the the following is correct? a F-test an F-test The F-test is pronounced as "ef test".
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74 views

Should I use `a SSTP` or `an SSTP`? [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: Do you use “a” or “an” before acronyms? First of all let me clarify that SSTP is an abbreviation of a technical term. I want to know, when using ...
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4answers
983 views

Why does English have an indefinite article? [closed]

I've seen many non-native speakers of English not making use of indefinite articles, presumably since their first language did not contain them. Thinking about this, and about the fact that even in ...
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3answers
995 views

Why do we use plural for indefinite objects?

Building off another question I answered here, I couldn't justify why exactly we say: I like to ride bicycles. Instead of: I like to ride a bicycle. (This could be anything: "climb mountains", ...
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votes
3answers
332 views

Using “a” vs “an” with 'very'

I've just read from a comment somewhere that 'a very emotional' is grammatically wrong, and it should be 'an very emotional'. Why is 'very' ignored in this case? If it should be ignored, are there any ...
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4answers
251 views

Dialog with an ok and cancel button

I'd be interested in your analysis of the following sentence (from program documentation): ... dialog with an ok and cancel button... [correct] Would be correct. However, why not: ... dialog ...
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8answers
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Why is there no plural indefinite article?

The takes either a singular or a plural subject. A/an only takes the singular. When we pluralize a noun preceded by an indefinite article, we simply drop the article (sometimes replacing it with ...
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1answer
184 views

Correct English: “An L.V.” or “a L.V.”? [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: “a” or “an” for words that don't start with vowels but sound like they're starting with a vowel Do you use “a” or “an” before acronyms? Does one use 'a' or ...
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2answers
119 views

A MPR vs AN MPR [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: Do you use “a” or “an” before acronyms? I searched google for "a MPR" and "an MPR". The first one returns about 52000 hits while the second one ...
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1answer
110 views

Why don't we use the indefinite article in “what hassle”?

Why don't we use the indefinite article in "what hassle"? I think hassle is used as noun here which means "Irritating or inconvenience". What exactly is the problem with "what a hassle" (as hassle is ...
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2answers
3k views

A or an XML report? [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: Do you use “a” or “an” before acronyms? Does one use 'a' or 'an' before the word 'X-Ray'? Quite simply, should a sentence read "a XML report" ...
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3answers
6k views

What is the difference between “little” and “a little”?

I would like to know how these two words differ in usage. Which one is singular? Which one is plural? I would greatly appreciate if you could provide me with a sample usage of these phrases.
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“I wrote a (albeit very rough) draft” or “I wrote an (albeit very rough) draft” [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: “a/an” preceding a parenthetical statement Does the parenthetical phrase change the "a" to an "an"? If you remove the parenthetical phrase, then you'd ...
1
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1answer
135 views

“a” or “an” in this situation? [duplicate]

Possible Duplicates: “A” vs. “An” in writing vs. pronunciation Use of “a” versus “an” I know that "an" should be used when a word is ...