2
votes
5answers
170 views

“I attend drawing class on Saturdays” vs. “I attend a drawing class on Saturdays”

I have recently been confronted with four statements about a child who has regularly (over more than a year) attended a drawing class (only one class) on Saturdays. I attend drawing class on ...
1
vote
1answer
62 views

A or An in “a (relatively) obscure meaning”?

I've just come across this sentence here at "english.stackexchange.com". "The writer should have taken care not to hide such a (relatively) obscure meaning underneath an obviously silly one." ...
-1
votes
1answer
284 views

Indefinite article before country name [closed]

We all wish for a Nigeria that provides and takes care of this countrymen. Is the indefinite article grammatical?
1
vote
2answers
80 views

'with X and Y' where 'Y' has no article

Okay, a brief grammatical scuffle has broken out on a forum I frequent, where someone used the expression 'with whiskey and cigar', and someone else claimed it was grammatically incorrect, suggesting ...
1
vote
1answer
117 views

“Had a seafood dinner” or “had seafood dinner”? [closed]

Which sentence is correct? I had a seafood dinner last night. I had seafood dinner last night.
0
votes
3answers
4k views

Which is correct, “from a young age” or “from young age”? [closed]

Consider this example: People tend to understand and use sarcasm from a young age. People tend to understand and use sarcasm from young age. Which one of these is grammatically correct ...
0
votes
5answers
640 views

“I'm Spanish” or “I'm a Spanish”?

Which one is correct? I am quite sure about "I'm Spanish", but is it wrong if I add an "a" before "Spanish"?
0
votes
1answer
79 views

'In the event of fire' or 'in the event of a fire'?

In the event of fire,... In the event of a fire,... I see both variants ondifferent Web pages and I cannot understand which is correct. Could you please explain it to me.
1
vote
2answers
80 views

How can I use “a” with “or”

I want to use a with or. Which of these two sentences is the correct one? Do you want a full time or half time? Do you want a full time or a half time?
7
votes
2answers
237 views

“An SATA device”? Weird article choice in suggested edit

This question references a suggested edit I rejected on Super User. The edit suggested that the a in There's no way you're plugging any of those directly into a SATA interface. be changed to ...
-2
votes
1answer
315 views

“I am puzzled by conflicting opinion on [a] coffee.”

I am puzzled by conflicting opinion on a coffee. I am puzzled by conflicting opinion on coffee. These sentences are from a syllabus book. And I don't know which one is correct.
0
votes
1answer
103 views

“Is there a best X?” — why “a” if it's the superlative degree?

Which of the following is grammatical? Is there a best school? Is there the best school? I'm sure that the first one is right. But why?
1
vote
1answer
482 views

“Seems like an overkill” vs. “seems like overkill” [closed]

I’m wondering if an article is used with the word overkill: Something seems like an overkill (to me). Something seems like overkill (to me). Which is grammatical?
0
votes
2answers
128 views

“This is a song by Lady Gaga” or “this is the song by Lady Gaga”? [closed]

Which article is appropriate in the blank below, a or the? — What are you singing? I've heard the song many times. — This is __ song by Lady Gaga.
-1
votes
3answers
605 views

What article should be used in such sentences?

What article should be used in the following sentence? He was English by [a/the/] blood. I feel there should be a zero article here, but I was taught that the zero article is impossible in ...
1
vote
2answers
122 views

Is “a” mandatory in “I'm a whole new (Name)”?

Let's say, your name is Kate and you say "I'm a whole new Kate!" Now, can you drop "a" and say "I'm whole new Kate!"? Or is it mandatory to keep it?
0
votes
5answers
2k views

“Is of the view that” vs. “is of a view that” [closed]

Is there any significant difference in the meanings of sentence 1 and sentence 2 below? Mr. Jones is of a view that the project is unnecessary. Mr. Jones is of the view that the project is ...
2
votes
2answers
248 views

Negatives with “a” or “any”

Are both these sentences correct? There isn’t a cat in the kitchen. There isn’t any cat in the kitchen.
-1
votes
2answers
2k views

“Go on excursion” vs. “go on an excursion” [closed]

Is it grammatical to say, "The class is going on excursion"? My thought is that it would be preferable to say "The class is going on an excursion". My colleague thinks that the first sentence is ...
1
vote
2answers
3k views

“It is bad practice …” vs. “It is a bad practice …”

"At work, it is bad practice to go to lunch early." "At work, it is a bad practice to go to lunch early." The noun "practice" is both countable and uncountable. So, could both sentences be ...
2
votes
2answers
4k views

“A hundred percent” vs. “hundred percent”

Which sentence is grammatically correct: I'm a hundred percent sure I'm hundred percent sure Any help would be greatly appreciated!
3
votes
2answers
568 views

Phrasing of “What knowledge is required [at/in] [a] university?”

In British English, how should I properly write a sentence like What knowledge is required at university? Basically, I want to ask what knowledge is required for study at a university or in a ...
3
votes
4answers
262 views

Dialog with an ok and cancel button

I'd be interested in your analysis of the following sentence (from program documentation): ... dialog with an ok and cancel button... [correct] Would be correct. However, why not: ... dialog ...
0
votes
1answer
230 views

Correct English: “An L.V.” or “a L.V.”? [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: “a” or “an” for words that don't start with vowels but sound like they're starting with a vowel Do you use “a” or “an” before acronyms? Does one use 'a' or ...
-5
votes
1answer
121 views

Why don't we use the indefinite article in “what hassle”?

Why don't we use the indefinite article in "what hassle"? I think hassle is used as noun here which means "Irritating or inconvenience". What exactly is the problem with "what a hassle" (as hassle is ...
8
votes
3answers
707 views

Is it correct to say “one out of *a* possible four”?

I am curious if it is correct to say "one out of a possible four". This is what I found in a publication: Discrete level (one out of a possible four), corresponding to a range of safety ...
3
votes
2answers
465 views

Which is correct: To “take a medical leave” or to “take medical leave”?

According to the Oxford Advanced Learner's Dictionary and Cambridge Dictionaries Online, leave is an uncountable noun when it is used to mean "a period of time away from work for a holiday/vacation or ...
11
votes
4answers
24k views

“As part of” versus “as a part of”

When should I use "as part of", and when "as a part of"?
10
votes
5answers
39k views

Which is correct — “a year” or “an year”?

The word year when pronounced starts with a phonetic sound of e which is a vowel sound making it eligible for being preceded by an. Yet, we tend to write a year. Why?
4
votes
3answers
4k views

“such a day” or “such day”?

It's such a nice day today! I'm interested in the usage of the indefinite article. I know this sentence is correct. We use an indefinite article in exclamations with countable nouns. But the ...
0
votes
0answers
2k views

“A heroic” or “An heroic”? [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: “A historic…” or “An historic…”? I have heard and read this combination both ways: It was a heroic act. It was an heroic act. ...
10
votes
4answers
14k views

Is it “a uniform” or “an uniform”? [duplicate]

On a Physics specification, it says: 6.7 Know how to use two permanent magnets to produce a uniform magnetic field pattern. Isn't it "produce an uniform magnetic field", or is the existing ...
3
votes
2answers
127 views

“Ate cheeseburger” or “ate a cheeseburger”?

Which of the following is correct? Ate a cheese burger last night. Ate cheese burger last night.
8
votes
1answer
1k views

Definite article with proper nouns, titles followed by a common noun

Over time I developed this rule where if a title or a proper name is followed by a common noun that represents the class of the entity I am referring to, then I use the definite article. In Example 1, ...
58
votes
11answers
28k views

When should I use “a” versus “an” in front of a word beginning with the letter h?

A basic grammar rule is to use an instead of a before a vowel sound. Given that historic is not pronounced with a silent h, I use “a historic”. Is this correct? What about heroic? Should be “It was a ...