0
votes
1answer
51 views

How can this be worded better? [closed]

How can this be better expressed? In respect of Anna's written wishes, there will be no funeral.
2
votes
1answer
68 views

It's fine by me

"Fine by me" seems like an unusual use of the word 'by'. Is it unique, or are there other cases like this? Is there a special term for this specific pattern?
2
votes
1answer
786 views

Reservation “under the name”, “in the name”, or “by the name” of Ms. X

Which idiom of "by the name", "under the name", and "in the name" is appropriate for reservations? e.g. There's a reservation by the name of Cullen... She made the reservation in the name of Jordan ...
0
votes
2answers
318 views

'In order to' or 'to'

Which sentence is correct and why? What is the difference in meaning? I have already written to you, and I received your reply to submit my documents. I have already written to you, and I ...
7
votes
2answers
574 views

“Let's get it over (with)” — do I need the “with”?

I'm trying to understand why there is this "with". I can say "Let's get this done". So, why "Let's get this over with?" I would really appreciate if someone could explain that a bit.
0
votes
1answer
159 views

When should I use “born to” vs. “born of”?

I want to shorten the sentence "Memories can only ever be created now." I'm debating between "Memories are born of now" and "Memories of born to now". The former sounds better, but is their a ...
0
votes
2answers
200 views

Difference between “sleeping with Sean Parker” and “sleeping on Sean Parker”?

In the movie Social Network, there is a scene where Sean Parker corrected a sentence said by a girl who he just spent a night with: She was rather astonished when she realized the man standing in ...
2
votes
2answers
448 views

Is it “moved into” or “moved in to”?

I suppose I am confused in general about the use of "into" versus "in to." For this case, though, consider the sentence, "I moved into my apartment today" as opposed to "I moved in to my apartment ...
1
vote
1answer
2k views

“Through the course” vs. “over the course”

I have heard the following used often Over the course of the semester, ... but a friend recently told me Through the course of the semester, ... Are both of these usages of the idiom ...
2
votes
2answers
156 views

“Wash hands of” — why not “off” instead of “of”?

The phrase "wash hands of" is supposed to mean giving up or having nothing to do with something. But why is it "of" and not "off"? Using "off" sounds more like giving it up and distancing oneself ...
0
votes
3answers
340 views

“in response to” vs “for response to”?

"I am writing in response to your mail." What does it mean by "in" in this sentence? Is "I am writing for response to your mail." acceptable?
1
vote
2answers
2k views

“Used to” or “used for”? [closed]

To me, "used to" and "used for" are incompatible, as shown in the examples below. However, I am unable to substantiate this. MS Word doesn't "see" the differences, so I turned to "Essential grammar in ...
3
votes
1answer
788 views

Etymology of the phrase “cannot see the forest for the trees”

How did this phrase originate grammatically? I’m especially interested in the fragment “for the trees”. See http://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/see_the_forest_for_the_trees for its definition.
0
votes
1answer
147 views

Perform magic to children vs perform magic for children [closed]

I've noticed that there seems to be a usage of "to" where I expect "for" in certain dialects of English. The one that caught my eye today was a Reddit submission where the OP used the title "Why you ...
0
votes
2answers
6k views

“Hang in” vs. “hang on”

Are these two the same when used to express "keep it up" or "survive a little longer"? Also, I often hear people say "hang in there", but I rarely hear people say "hang on there".
0
votes
2answers
229 views

'Consists of a lot of' or 'consists lot of' [closed]

Which is correct grammar, Farming consists a lot of manual work. Farming consists of a lot of manual work. Also, is is ok to write 'a lot of' instead of 'lot of'?
5
votes
4answers
20k views

Get hold of, get ahold of, get a hold of

Under what circumstances would you prefer one of the below over others? a) Get hold of, b) Get ahold of, c) Get a hold of
4
votes
3answers
3k views

“Bachelor of ” vs. “Bachelor in”

We had this argument today at work regarding which one of those two is more correct. Neither of us is a native English speaker. A simple Google research would reveal that most Wikipedia articles use ...
1
vote
1answer
356 views

“Grab me from my arm” vs “Grab my arm”

What is the difference between saying the following two: She grabbed my arm and walked me to the car. She grabbed me from my arm and walked me to the car.
3
votes
1answer
6k views

Is single-word “inbetween” becoming more acceptable? How far can it go?

I get the distinct feeling that "inbetween" occurs increasingly often as a single word, but I'm not at all clear on why it's used more in some contexts than others. What I can is see that in Google ...
1
vote
3answers
5k views

Put your shoes on and Take your coat off [closed]

I have often heard the following statements when someone talks about shoes, cloths, etc. I don't know which one is more appropriate or grammatically correct. Hey, put your shoes on. Hey, put ...
9
votes
5answers
1k views

Should we worry about what precedes a preposition?

Should we always worry about what precedes a preposition? Many times we come across people concerned with what preposition comes after a certain word. A preposition's raison d'être is qualifying ...
4
votes
2answers
94 views

Usage of “kick in”

Is the following usage of the words "kick in" proper? Is this: The rollover will only kick in in the next billing cycle. better than this? The rollover will kick in the next billing cycle. ...
4
votes
3answers
383 views

Correct version of “arrive”

The "Deutsche Bahn" - our German railway exmonopolist - is driving me nuts each time I ride the train, when the conductors tell us In 5 minutes, we arrive Bremen consistently in all trains ...
1
vote
3answers
510 views

Is “[I am] possessed of impeccable grammar” correct, idiomatic, or ironic?

If it's a correct, non-idiomatic usage, is "possessed" an adjective, or...? What is "of" under that circumstance?
10
votes
3answers
2k views

Difference between 'later' and 'later on'

Is there any difference between the usage of 'later' and 'later on'? I'll see you later. I'll finish it later on.
1
vote
1answer
77 views

“A begs B” or “A begs for B” when we mean that A asks for B

Here's the actual sentence "A subjective question begs a subjective answer..." Something inside my head says it should have been "A subjective question begs for a subjective answer..." ...
8
votes
3answers
417 views

Why “off” in “off to the sides”

I found online the following: Pedestrians are pushed off to the sides. either in the middle or off to the sides. Off to the sides were open fields. ...flows off to the sides of ...
3
votes
2answers
124 views

“With an (instrument)” and “by (instrument)”

"We forced the door with a jimmy" is idiomatic whereas "The door was forced by jimmy" (Note there is no article after 'by' in this sentence) is also idiomatic. However, "We forced the door by jimmy" ...
4
votes
3answers
1k views

“…must have taken ‘after’ his daddy.”

I read this phrase: My son cracks me up. He's had me laughing all day long. Must have taken after his daddy. I want to know what after means in this construction, and if there is some formal ...
0
votes
2answers
5k views

“Too much time has passed.”

Too much time has passed. Is this grammatically correct? Wouldn't it be better to say Too much time has passed by. or Too much time has gone past.
4
votes
3answers
4k views

Why is it a “night on the town” and not “night in the town”?

Question as in the title. I commonly use the phrase "out and about in town" in speech. I'm not sure if my usage is correct because of the "night on the town" phrase.
3
votes
3answers
14k views

Proper use of “out to lunch”, “out for lunch” and “out at lunch”

Recently a co-worker and I debated the proper use of "out to lunch". The argument stemmed from conversation over the appropriate preposition to use, and became particularly heated when we tried to ...
3
votes
3answers
714 views

Can “deprived of” be used in this way?

I looked up the synonym dictionary, and it told me that "deprived of" can be the alternative of "without". So I'm wondering if this usage is right: Deprived of his partner, he couldn't win by ...
5
votes
3answers
21k views

Which is the correct preposition for the end of “pride myself” (is it “on”, “at”, or “in”)?

as in "I pride myself on my ability to speak Klingon and Romulan in the appropriate accents." Which is the correct preposition for the end of that expression?
3
votes
3answers
911 views

“Put it at the backseat” or “Put it onto the backseat”?

What preposition should I use in the expression "put ___ the backseat"? The sentence goes like this: I have a few items on my plans, item A is the least important one, so I will put it ___ the ...