0
votes
1answer
95 views

Is “down the years” a common idiom?

Is it possible to say that "something horrible will happen down the years"?
0
votes
2answers
54 views

Who(m) I have left out [duplicate]

In the acknowledgments of my thesis, after a long list of names, I (also) want to thank "[...] all other supportive people who**m** I have inevitably left out". Does this look appropriate? In ...
1
vote
2answers
144 views

Is this correct English or is it slang from a particular region?

Is it correct to ask "Are you in area?" when you are asking if someone is from that city or township?
-1
votes
4answers
277 views

The expression “not so much”

I have noticed the appearance of the phrase "not so much" in the language recently. It strikes me as both grammatically incorrect and humorous when used. For example,"Jim is very smart; his brother, ...
2
votes
1answer
66 views

Is “back the hall” accepted usage?

In response to the question "Where is she?", I've heard someone say, "She's back the hall." (Cf. "She's back there.") I understand the meaning to be something like "She's down the hall," "She's in the ...
0
votes
3answers
185 views

Is “we all pull on one single string” an idiom or is it just wrong? [closed]

We all pull on one single string. Is this correct English? When I look up the intended meaning of this phrase, I get the following results from several online dictionaries: to pull ...
2
votes
1answer
97 views

Pluralizing a thing expressed by a quoted or hyphenated phrase, e.g. better-than-nothing or “better than nothing”

I found myself writing And so, they went on amassing better-than-nothing's. because I wanted better-than-nothing to be a kind of catchphrase, referred to in this form consistently throughout my ...
-1
votes
2answers
502 views

Is it proper to say I am going to “prom” or is it “the prom” [closed]

Is it proper to say I am “going to prom”, or is it “going to the prom”? If prom is short for promenade, then it is a verb but usage has made it a noun? Is prom a noun or verb?
0
votes
1answer
620 views

Idioms and Formal Usage

Certain websites devoted to idioms claim that they--idioms-- are not used in formal conversations or writing; that is, they claim that these creatures are always used in only informal situations. As ...
2
votes
2answers
151 views

'too dangerous to let live' or 'too dangerous to be let live'?

I was writing something down that came to me in a passing while I was watching TV, and I found myself discombobulated with the way one should phrase the notion of letting someone do something in the ...
3
votes
2answers
160 views

usage of “Made for”

eg. I would've made for a bad lawyer. conveying the meaning that if I had been a lawyed, I would have been a bad one. is it correct usage?
3
votes
3answers
183 views

Parallelism with “in order to”

Which of the following is grammatically correct, or are they both gramatically correct? We use this product in order to increase work efficiency and to streamline testing. We use this product in ...
0
votes
1answer
125 views

On His Post, At His Post

I have this: link On 21-22 April 1914, while leading three picket launches admist heavy enemy fire, McCloy was wounded but remained on his post, enabling cruisers to save American lives. For ...
-2
votes
1answer
211 views

usage of “lead to”

If I want to use lead to, does it always need to use being as shown below. less number of points lead to missing edges being occurred, are recognized using proximity analysis.
1
vote
2answers
2k views

“Used to” or “used for”? [closed]

To me, "used to" and "used for" are incompatible, as shown in the examples below. However, I am unable to substantiate this. MS Word doesn't "see" the differences, so I turned to "Essential grammar in ...
6
votes
1answer
2k views

Is “make due” now considered acceptable?

Whilst plodding through Patrick Rothfuss' "The Name of the Wind", I came across: Our dinner was nowhere near as grand as last night's. We made due with the last of my now-stale flatbread, dried ...
0
votes
2answers
245 views

'Consists of a lot of' or 'consists lot of' [closed]

Which is correct grammar, Farming consists a lot of manual work. Farming consists of a lot of manual work. Also, is is ok to write 'a lot of' instead of 'lot of'?
3
votes
4answers
1k views

Be careful for what you eat or Be careful what you eat

I usually hear "Be careful what you eat" and also Google is telling me that but it seems "Be careful for what you eat" to me right. Could you please explain which one is right and why please?
5
votes
3answers
323 views

“Went” vs. “went along”

At work, he made up lies as he went along. At work, he made up lies as he went. Is one of the above wrong?
2
votes
1answer
5k views

“If not for you” meaning

Today I have encountered a phrase: If not for you, I would be poor. I would think it is like "if there were not you", is it like that? On the other hand, how would I say the following as the ...
4
votes
2answers
393 views

Correct use of “rid of”

From what I understood, "rid of" is used when I want to express that particular object will be disposed of something. "Get rid of something," on the other hand, does not specify the object. According ...
1
vote
4answers
420 views

Is “go on +verb root” grammatically right?

I came across the line, "he went on explain (a metaphor) in the clip," at the end of the following sentence of the article, "How to insult your political opponents" appearing in New Yorker magazine ...
6
votes
6answers
3k views

Why do we say “to be a laughing stock”?

I've come through the expression "to be a laughing stock" to talk about a person who has done something stupid and who people laugh at because of that, and I've started to wonder about it. First of ...
1
vote
2answers
161 views

“Summoning something into life” vs. “summoning something to life”

What is the difference between the following? Summoning ... into life Summoning ... to life If it helps, I want to use the word idea in the place of dots so it's like: Summoning ...
1
vote
4answers
872 views

Is this saying grammatically correct? [closed]

Is the phrase seat well and hold steadily grammatically correct? If it is, why does it use seat instead of sit? PS:the instruction will be used on the bus.
2
votes
6answers
51k views

“Take a rest” or “have some rest”?

Which one of the above is the correct, or can I use both? Or is there any better way to say that?
7
votes
5answers
16k views

Is “a ways to go” grammatically correct?

In English we often say, for example, "he still has a ways to go before he's done." Is this grammatically correct?
1
vote
3answers
1k views

How to understand “It takes a little bit of getting used to the idea…”?

The following sentence is from a mathematical lecture note here: It takes a little bit of getting used to the idea of a function that cannot actually be evaluated at any specific point, but with ...
9
votes
5answers
744 views

Do idioms pose an exception to normal definite and indefinite article usage?

I found this phrase in my biology textbook (emphasis added): ...in relation to Earth's history, 100,000 years or even a million years is the blink of an eye. The part of the phrase in question ...
7
votes
3answers
6k views

Analysis of “It is like a dream come true”

I've been unable to grammatically analyse the sentence It is like a dream come true. To me, it should either be It is like a dream that has come true or It is like a dream comes true. ...
4
votes
3answers
3k views

Usage of “how come” while speaking

I had always heard people saying like (never seen written anywhere but just heard it): How come you come to office on Sunday? How come is this possible? It doesn't seem right to me when ...
0
votes
1answer
1k views

How to interpret the phrase “no more” in “Don't love no more”(Craig David's song)?

How should I interpret the phrase "no more" in one of Craig David's songs? or "no more" in the lyrics of the song shall not be deem as a phrase? Lyrics -- Don't Love You No More: I’m sick and ...
14
votes
7answers
2k views

Is the phrase “for free” correct?

A friend claims that the phrase for free is incorrect. Should we only say at no cost instead?
1
vote
3answers
157 views

Is “driving the reins” used as a deliberately erroneous phrase?

In her blog post introducing Blog Overflow, the estimable Rebecca Chernoff committed the following, uh, sentence: Have someone driving the reigns. After cringing (read: screaming in pain) and ...
6
votes
3answers
3k views

Is the expression 'half a percent' acceptable in formal English?

When central banks raise or lower interest rates the radio announcer will say for example: an increase of one half of one percent Informally people use half a percent instead, which is less ...
0
votes
2answers
6k views

“Too much time has passed.”

Too much time has passed. Is this grammatically correct? Wouldn't it be better to say Too much time has passed by. or Too much time has gone past.
1
vote
1answer
1k views

Is it “out of question” or “out of the question”?

Are they used in different contexts? Those both of them use correct grammar? Google fight shows that "out of the question" appear 10 times more often than the other.
5
votes
4answers
418 views

“In the nick of time” or “in a nick of time?”

They both sound right and I've found examples of both.
3
votes
3answers
16k views

Proper use of “out to lunch”, “out for lunch” and “out at lunch”

Recently a co-worker and I debated the proper use of "out to lunch". The argument stemmed from conversation over the appropriate preposition to use, and became particularly heated when we tried to ...
2
votes
3answers
804 views

Can “deprived of” be used in this way?

I looked up the synonym dictionary, and it told me that "deprived of" can be the alternative of "without". So I'm wondering if this usage is right: Deprived of his partner, he couldn't win by ...
1
vote
1answer
133 views

Is it correct to use “giving rating”?

For example, is "they gave the same rating to the movie" a proper usage?
24
votes
6answers
27k views

Why is it “on *the* one hand”?

According to all dictionaries I can see and everyday use by native speakers, this is the correct way: On the one hand, it's larger; on the other hand, it's more expensive. What makes no sense to ...
15
votes
3answers
1k views

Definite article — “on television” vs. “on the radio”

Why are these different? We heard the news on the radio. We watched the news on television. In this book, the author says we must use television without the. Why? It makes me crazy. Is ...
2
votes
3answers
545 views

Using 'to swallow' to indicate having an emotionally hard time accepting a truth

Can 'to swallow' be used to indicate that you have a hard time accepting a truth? Neither a hard time in the sense of being able to understand it nor to accept that it is true, but rather in the ...
5
votes
3answers
2k views

When it came time to

When it came time to... Is the phrase technically correct, or is it an exercise of artistic license?
2
votes
3answers
814 views

Is “if winning isn't everything then why do they keep score” a correct sentence?

We wanted to use this as a T-shirt quote, but I feel that "if winning isn't everything then why do they keep score" is wrong. The correct sentence should be "if winning isn't everything then why do ...
16
votes
6answers
18k views

Is “my bad” a correct English phrase?

I have seen many people use the phrase "my bad" in Internet forums. What does it exactly imply and is it a proper English phrase?
10
votes
3answers
4k views

Is “bad loser” a valid expression?

Is the expression "(someone is a) bad loser" valid? If it is valid, is it equal to "sore loser", or does it have a different meaning and/or use?
2
votes
7answers
471 views

“Aaron is a genius boy”

I wonder whether can we call someone a genius boy? I've been using this term to describe my cousin until someone told me that the correct usage should be boy genius. The question is: Can we say Aaron ...
5
votes
2answers
9k views

What alternative would you suggest to “in/with regard(s?) to”?

I see in many of the "corporate emails" I receive the expression: "in regard to". Sometimes, it is also written "in regards to". First, to be sure: "in regards to" (with an extra 's') is ...