2
votes
1answer
84 views

What does 'both of you' mean?

How does one reflect the difference in meaning between 'I gave one to both of you' meaning you gave one to each of them, and 'I gave one to both of you' meaning you gave one item for the two to share? ...
-1
votes
2answers
51 views

'Master of the universe' or 'Nucleus of the universe'

Can I say: No one likes man thinks he is a nucleus of universe. I've just seen on some website the use of "master of the universe" I'd better use this word? And please correct my grammar.
0
votes
1answer
57 views

“Assist someone do” vs. “assist someone to do (or ”in/with“ doing)”

I just recently came across "assist someone do" searching Google for examples to my previous question, and would like to check with you whether it is an acceptable option to "assist someone to do (or ...
0
votes
3answers
104 views

Do I say: “Hook me up to this nice party!” or “Hook me up on this nice party!”

Do I say: Hook me up to this nice party! OR Hook me up on this nice party! I am trying to give a connotation that the party sounds good and I want my friend to give me an invitation to go ...
3
votes
2answers
119 views

“If it ain't in writing it don't exist” - why the broken grammar?

In the idiom "If it ain't ... it don't exist.", why is "don't" used instead of "doesn't"? I'm thinking the intentional error might serve to draw the attention of the listener to the word ...
1
vote
1answer
647 views

Which is correct: “as good as possible” or “as best as possible”?

Which one is the correct expression: as good as possible as best as possible Both were suggested to be used in the following sentence: The activity has been performed as good/best as ...
0
votes
2answers
79 views

Bunch of girls/Buncha girls

as English isn't my first language, I don't really 'feel' whether bunch of girls/buncha girls is offensive, friendly, etc.? Could you tell me what's the proper meaning of the phrase? I hear it in ...
2
votes
3answers
82 views

The whys and the hows

Are apostrophes needed in this phrase? The whys and the hows I searched for duplicate questions, but the closest I found was in regard to words inside quotes.
-1
votes
2answers
71 views

What is the exact usage of “the” [closed]

I've seen this word many times but I never understand what that exactly means. AFAIK it is used to refer to a known object but sometimes I see different usages. Can any one explain exact usage and ...
1
vote
1answer
165 views

Why “Daddy” in this sentence was written with a capital D?

Why is Daddy in this sentence written with a capital D? Her love letters to and from Daddy were in an old box, tied with ribbons and stiff, rigid-with-age leather thongs. This sentence is from ...
0
votes
1answer
62 views

Only a something away from completing something

Is this statement grammatically correct: Only an Xbox One away from completing my Microsoft family. I have a Microsoft Phone (Lumia 920), PC (Dell) and tablet (Surface Pro) and I just need a ...
16
votes
3answers
527 views

''Honey'' Usage Question

my friend (he's from Europe, white in his 20s) was in the U.S. a while ago and went to a diner a few times. A woman there (in her late 40s, most likely), kept calling him ''honey'' and ''sweetie'' ...
1
vote
1answer
86 views

Log the user out of system or log out the user from the system

I was working on a user manual and I want to write that a particular action would result in user being logged out of the system. I'm wondering whether the sentence should be "The action would log the ...
3
votes
1answer
88 views

“until the end of (the) time(s)”?

I'm trying to translate a phrase from Spanish ("Hasta el final de los tiempos") and I was thinking of using one of these phrases: Until the end of time Until the end of the times Until the end of ...
2
votes
2answers
225 views

“Be to sleep” - What does that mean? [closed]

Normally, I find English people say something like: He is sleeping. He goes to sleep early. But occasionally, I found something like: "I have been to sleep 3 times during the lesson." (Michael ...
6
votes
3answers
3k views

Grammar parsing for “if need be”

I have a following question. There is an idiom 'if need be'. The meaning is clear, but I can't comprehend it from a grammatical point of view. How should I parse it? 'if [smth] needs to be'? Why not ...
2
votes
1answer
202 views

Tag questions with or - shouldn't they be the opposite in the tag [closed]

I wonder why tag questions have a tag that is not the other possibility of the sentence that precedes the tag. For instance: 1) "This tag question is an example, or is it?" Shouldn't it be: 2) ...
8
votes
3answers
473 views

Is this contraction of 'there is' acceptable to native speakers of English?

In the Slate article, The Curse of “You May Also Like”, the following sentence has a contraction of there is that doesn't sit well with my ear for American or British English. I wonder whether any of ...
-2
votes
1answer
864 views

When do we use “to” as an infinitive marker? [closed]

In these two sentences: I look forward to get. I look forward to getting it. Why is the first sentence incorrect? When do we use to as an infinitive marker?
2
votes
3answers
6k views

“on par with” vs “on a par with”

Which of "on par with" and "on a par with" is the more correct way of saying that two things are of equal value, and why? Examples from a couple of google searches: "His verbal intelligence was not ...
0
votes
2answers
1k views

To Be Used Of/For

Does "to be used OF" mean "to be used FOR": wikipedia The English term "empiric" derives from the Greek word ἐμπειρία, which is cognate with and translates to the Latin experientia, from which ...
0
votes
1answer
100 views

On His Post, At His Post

I have this: link On 21-22 April 1914, while leading three picket launches admist heavy enemy fire, McCloy was wounded but remained on his post, enabling cruisers to save American lives. For ...
1
vote
4answers
481 views

Does “I am thirsty to die” make sense?

"I am hungry to die" doesn't mean that I am dying because of hunger, rather, "I want to die a lot." How about "I am thirsty to die?" Does this mean "I am dying because of thirst?" I want to know ...
1
vote
0answers
873 views

Find the error in this sentence? [closed]

I have the following sentence from SAT practice. Fran (A) would be happy to assist Brad, had he (B) simply requested help (C) early enough to give her time (D) to complete her own assignments. ...
3
votes
3answers
1k views

Why is it “make sure that” (no 'it') but “make it so” (with 'it')?

Once again, y'all can blame my boss. Well, him or Captain Picard. He (my boss, not Picard) has the annoying habit of saying "Make it sure that", instead of "Make sure that". No matter how many times I ...
0
votes
1answer
147 views

Perform magic to children vs perform magic for children [closed]

I've noticed that there seems to be a usage of "to" where I expect "for" in certain dialects of English. The one that caught my eye today was a Reddit submission where the OP used the title "Why you ...
4
votes
3answers
2k views

Other ways of saying “except for one”

For example in the sentence All datapoints, except for one, lie on a line. to me (not a native English speaker), the "except for one" part sounds too heavy. Are there other, lighter ways of ...
1
vote
4answers
9k views

“Going to go” vs “going to”

1) I am going to go watch a game. 2) I am going to a game. 3) I am going to golf. 4) I am going to go golfing. What are the differences and similarities between and among sentences ...
10
votes
4answers
8k views

Which is correct: “home in” or “hone in”?

I've heard people say "Home in on something", but I've also heard others say "Hone in on something". Which is the correct expression, and what is the etymology of these?
7
votes
2answers
2k views

What is the origin of the phrase “you've got another thing/think coming”?

What is the origin of the phrase "you've got another thing coming"? And — perhaps more importantly — is it more correct than the alternative "you've got another think coming"?
5
votes
4answers
2k views

Is the expression “done right” proper grammar?

Suppose I have the sentence: "This is a website done right." It sounds wrong, but I cannot find any grammatical rules that confirm my suspicions. Am I just crazy or is that improper grammar?
26
votes
4answers
12k views

How does the phrase “used to” work, grammatically?

It is common to hear people say "used to" to indicate that they did something in the past but no longer do; for example, "I used to play basketball." How would "used to," used in that context, fit ...
15
votes
2answers
641 views

What is the correct spelling of “buyer* remorse”?

Apostrophical query: a) Buyers Remorse b) Buyer Remorse c) Buyer's Remorse d) Buyers' Remorse My guess is b or c, as it seems like any example is talking about the remorse of one specific buyer, ...