A hyphen is a symbol used to join two words or two syllables of a single word together. It is not to be confused with dashes or the minus symbol, as these are all longer than the hyphen and serve different purposes in language.

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17 views

Would you ever use “closed-loop” as an adjective without a hyphen?

Is it correct to use "closed-loop" as an adjective without a hyphen? Example: Partners can serve as a recycling hub and sell the products in their stores, telling a closed-loop story. Our ...
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2answers
44 views

Non-sea salt sulfate or non-sea-salt sulfate?

Atmospheric sea salt particles contain sulfate but also other sources of atmospheric sulfate exist. In scientific studies on particulate sulfate air pollution it is common to split between sulfate ...
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2answers
340 views

Use of apostrophe in adjective phrase containing a possessive

I work and write for a tech company that has created many first-in-the-world technologies. In press releases, I often write something like “[Company name] today announced another world’s first with ...
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0answers
25 views

Hyphenation of words like ‘waterproof’

The Oxford dictionary states that most compound adjectives made from a noun and an adjective should be hyphenated (e.g. ‘accident-prone’, ‘camera-ready’). On the other hand, its entry for the word ...
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2answers
112 views

Slashes for hyphens in compound modifiers

Take the phrase "a joint FBI-SFPD task force" for example. According to my boss, a slash can stand in for the hyphen. I tend to disagree. Is this grammatically correct? Stylistically acceptable?
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2answers
83 views

Other special hyphenation examples than eight-teen

According to The TeXbook [Don Knuth, 1984], solution to Exercise 14.8, the word eighteen should be hyphenated eight-teen. It is, indeed, standard practice in pre-reform German to contract triple ...
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0answers
16 views

When to use hyphen against bracket [duplicate]

This is purely out of interest but I often see the use of hyphens interchanged with brackets like; Britain would be able to trade in the European Free Trade Zone that stretches from Iceland to ...
2
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1answer
67 views

Suspended hyphen example

As far as I've seen, it seems like whether or not one should use suspended hyphens is determined on a mostly ad-hoc basis. So, I was wondering if someone could give me advice on whether or not the ...
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1answer
36 views

Hyphenation with numbers [closed]

I know that a compound adjective preceding a noun would require hyphenation in most circumstances; however, this particular phrasing has me doubting myself and I'd just like some clarification, if ...
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7answers
4k views

What word to choose as the opposite of “self-aware”?

What word would describe the quality of not being self-aware? unselfaware unself-aware un-selfaware un-self-aware non-self-aware I am aware that it is allowed to have multiple hyphens in a word. ...
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1answer
59 views

How to “hyphenate” the word “standardize”?

I don't really know if the term "hyphenate" is the correct here, I use it because of my LaTeX usage. What I mean (and if there is a word for this, please let me know) is: how to break "standardize" ...
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7answers
36k views

Appropriate dash to use when attributing a quotation?

If I’m citing a poem or quotation, what kind of dash precedes the author’s name? For example: This Business of Printing; which I am heartily tired of, and repent I e’er attempted....  —John ...
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3answers
164 views

How should “condolences” be hyphenated?

My word processor soft-hyphenated condolences as condolenc-es. Does this look natural to the eyes of native speakers? I, a non-native speaker, think it should be condolen-ces.
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2answers
5k views

Is grownup, grown up, or grown-up the correct usage (as a noun)? [closed]

When used as a noun (meaning an adult), is "grownup", "grown up", or "grown-up" more appropriate?
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1answer
40 views

Must I hyphenate my “write-up”? [closed]

I'm aware that as a verbal phrase, "write up" should never be hyphenated, nor should it be combined into one word. You may write up a document, or you may write something up, but you can never ...
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0answers
16 views

Separate or join words [duplicate]

I've read some answers abour when to join two words and when to write them separate, and when to write them with a hyphen. "Username", "user name" or "user-name" Which ...
0
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1answer
58 views

“something come something”, or foo-come-bar

Is the bold construct below valid? Does it have a name? What sort of punctuation would you use for it? Fnord, the something-come-such-and-so, was under development for a year or so. It suffered a ...
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4answers
1k views

Pronunciation of “-” sign, particularly in Unix commands

While talking about commands for command-line interface, I sometimes need to pronounce how command should be typed, like this one: nc -l -p 1234 I used to pronounce - sign in this context as a ...
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1answer
41 views

Hypenating in the middle of a person's name [closed]

The editor or a Club bulletin split's a person's name if it comes at the end of the line in an article. I do not believe this is grammatically correct, but I cannot find a ruling in writing to ...
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1answer
111 views

Should one hyphenate 'shoulder width' in this context?

I believe that in this context: Place your feet shoulder-width apart. it makes sense to hyphenate to avoid confusion. I see that apart is listed as an adverb in the dictionary and width as a ...
2
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2answers
7k views

When is it appropriate to use a hyphen? [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: To hyphenate or not? What is the proper way to spell "side dish"? Is it: "side dish" or "side-dish"? Also, Is it "ham-fried" or "ham fried"? Basically, when do you use ...
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2answers
45 views

Rules on hyphenating phrases

I see a ton of questions on hyphenated words, specifically, but nothing on the more general question how/when they're supposed to be used vs omitted. Another great answer gives some general rules on ...
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4answers
4k views

“Well-being” or “wellbeing”? [closed]

I was writing a document in Microsoft Word and I used the word "well-being". Word told me to correct it to "wellbeing". When I do, Word tells me to correct it back to "well-being". Which is correct? I ...
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2answers
130 views

Reimplement or re-implement? [duplicate]

Which form is correct (or more correct): reimplement or re-implement? And to extend the question a little bit, are there any rules concerning both, e.g. re-scan or rescan, re-evaluation or ...
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2answers
40 views

Is this sentence correct?

Sentence: My friendly but silly, creepy but inviting neighbor waited for me in the parking lot. My concern was whether I needed some hyphens for the modifiers in "friendly but silly" and "creepy but ...
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4answers
68 views

Hyphens in “nationally top ranked” [duplicate]

In order to combine "nationally" and "top-ranked" would the resulting qualifier be written as "nationally-top-ranked" or "nationally top-ranked"? Edit: I do not immediately see the applicability of ...
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3answers
620 views

Should “no longer” have a hyphen?

I have always put a hyphen in the fragment "no-longer X", but neither the BBC website or the Economist seem to put one in. I always thought that The piece of string was no longer than five inches. ...
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2answers
173 views

“It's 20 meters thick” versus “It's a 20-meter-thick layer.”

I know that both of these expressions are correct, but I'd like to be able to explain exactly why the first one is correct. Of course compound adjectives are hyphenated (second expression), but in the ...
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1answer
40 views

high throughput, high-throughput or high through-put [duplicate]

All these three forms, high throughput, high-throughput or high through-put, are used in the scientific community by Google Scholar searching. Where is the hyphen should be? Is there a specific ...
0
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0answers
21 views

hyphen usage, adjective, left-and-right jaw-rubbing

Is the following sentence correct? After thinking for a while , he resumed his left-and-right jaw-rubbing motion. Or should it be written After thinking for a while, he resumed his ...
1
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4answers
61 views

“watch more realistic 3D scenes” & hyphen

Problem: "viewers can watch more realistic 3D scenes and interact..." Do I need to hyphenate "more realistic" here? I think I do, as the compound modifier "more realistic" is modifying "3D ...
3
votes
3answers
181 views

13 Month Old or 13-Month-Old? [duplicate]

I have just installed Grammarly and it showed up something which i am not sure of. It corrected '13 month old' to '13-month-old'. The context is I ask because my 13-month-old God daughter ...
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5answers
135 views

Nonstop, non-stop, or non stop? [closed]

Which is the proper spelling of "nonstop?" nonstop or non stop or non-stop
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1answer
37 views

Hyphenation of a compound modifier formed of an adjective and a noun

Earlier questions on the hyphenation of compound modifiers have been well answered, so now I would sharpen the question. We seem to agree that this has good hyphenation: The question is well ...
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2answers
89 views

Does this open compound noun require a hyphen when used as an adjective?

A friend of mine works at a restaurant that sells tortilla soup; however, I think the soup tastes like hot dogs. There are thus three ways to write this: hot dog soup, hot-dog soup, hotdog soup. Only ...
0
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1answer
33 views

Well-posed vs. well posed [duplicate]

I have a question that comes up when writing mathematical problems. Which of the following is correct: The problem is well-posed or The problem is well posed. I am sure the second is ...
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4answers
44k views

How do you spell wifi / Wi-Fi / WiFi?

This is probably related to whether one should capitalize Internet or not. I am looking for the correct spelling of wifi when referring to a wireless connection to the Internet. I want to tell the ...
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2answers
89 views

Should you hyphenate “high demand”?

Which one is more correct? The concert was a big success due to high demand. The concert was a big success due to high-demand. This article seems to suggest that you hyphenate "high" when ...
0
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0answers
109 views

What is the correct way to write the word “back-end”? [duplicate]

Back-end and front-end are common technical terms nowadays. Traditionally, they are written with a hyphen "back-end". Is there a rule in the English language that dictates this to be a correct way to ...
0
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1answer
53 views

Properly Using Hyphenated Clauses

I'm writing a paper about quantum computing and I'm trying to cite a source; however, I feel that the sentence in which I do this is clunky and forced. According to The Washington Post’s Vivek ...
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2answers
100 views

An antonym for 'sought-after'

Whenever describing something that is seldom looked for or desired I often verbalise it with "ill sought after" without hesitating. (ignore that ill is its own word, the trouble I'm having writing it ...
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4answers
41k views

Do I keep myself “up-to-date” or “up to date” on something?

Question is quite straightforward. I want to say that "I keep myself up-to-date on the latest technology". Or is it better "I keep myself up to date with the latest technology"?
2
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2answers
2k views

Space before/after emdash or not? [duplicate]

I have seen style manuals suggest that there be no space between emdash and the surrounding words. The following NY times article has spaces in the first sentence: "An expression of concern by ...
16
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5answers
12k views

How do I hyphenate an open-form compound word with another that should be hyphenated?

I'm confused about how to combine an open-form compound word with a word that would normally be hyphenated. There's excellent guidance for making the open vs. closed vs. hyphenated decision, but I ...
1
vote
2answers
2k views

“easy to use” versus “easy-to-use”

My belief is that the following two phrases are correct: A: "The app is easy to use." B: "It is an easy-to-use app." And that the following is not technically correct: C: "It is an easy to use ...
0
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1answer
217 views

“4 year long” or “4 yearlong”? [closed]

I am wanting to convey this sentence: This year marks the end of the 4 year long 'Environmental Protection Victoria' project. I have looked online to no avail, can anyone tell me if '4 year ...
0
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1answer
71 views

Toll Free or Toll-Free on business cards and letterheads [closed]

Which is correct for business card and letterhead: Toll Free: (800) 000-0000 Toll-Free: (800) 000-000 Toll free: (800) 000-0000 Toll-free: (800) 000-0000
2
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1answer
89 views

Hyphenation in “high frequency words”

My granddaughter's first-grade reading papers frequently use the term "high frequency words." I'm guessing it refers to words used frequently. But, if the term "high frequency words" is correctly ...
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1answer
56 views

Listing multiple compound words

How do I list multiple things that are compound words? In my own language I'm used to writing these lists like this: "I kicked foot-, basket-, and volleyball" The sentence is supposed to mean that ...
69
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7answers
22k views

When is it necessary to use a hyphen in writing a compound word?

Some words are written without hyphens (nonaggression, nonbeliever), and some words are written with a hyphen (well-intentioned). Is there a schema in the use of a hyphen?