A hyphen is a symbol used to join two words or two syllables of a single word together. It is not to be confused with dashes or the minus symbol, as these are all longer than the hyphen and serve different purposes in language.

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hyphenation of adjective phrases [duplicate]

Should adjectival phrases that are hyphenated when they modify a noun, e.g. a case-sensitive password, be hyphenated when they are predicate adjectives, e.g. The password is case-sensitive?
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32 views

Which word is most correct in this case: re-settle or resettle?

In reference to the word settle as it pertains to the specific definition: Determine; decide on: There is some debate internally on whether to use the word resettle which only has one ...
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1answer
88 views

Child-murderer or child murderer?

During an episode of Archer, he criticized a journalist's grammar for her misuse of the word 'child-murderer'. She meant one who murders children, and Archer argued in using the hyphenated form, she ...
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76 views

Mandatory usage of Hyphens?

I have a question regarding the use of hyphens. My native language is German, and there is a set of rules regarding hyphenation. There are mandatory and optional rules for it. Now, Consider the ...
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3answers
69 views

Is “UTF-8-encoded” an overuse of hypens? Does “UTF-8 encoded” require a hyphen?

After reading usage of the phrase "UTF-8 encoded" ("UTF-8-encoded) at, for example, stackoverflow.com, in Howto identify UTF-8 encoded strings, and in an excerpt ...every character can be UTF-8 ...
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153 views

“Would-be” meaning “potential”: must it be hyphenated?

Suppose I write, "Giving exams in class thwarts would-be cheaters." Must "would-be" have a hyphen? Or would it be preferable to write it without a hyphen? (It seems easier to read with the hyphen.) ...
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88 views

Hyphenate or not?

Should I hyphenate the phrase "pedestrian detection algorithm" in the example sentence below? The algorithm is designed to detect pedestrians. However, I am worried that it could be misread as a ...
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92 views

In a regular sentence, I could add more information by using dashes - like this - or commas ,like this, but what if I want to do that in a list?

I'm writing a story where only certain people know something about my MC. I list the people like this: Only my coaches, my best friend - Alicia, who’s also my cousin -, and her parents. I add ...
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352 views

How should one punctuate “upper right most”?

For upper right most, I’ve seen it written upper-right most, upper-right-most, and with no hyphens at all. What makes the most sense to me is upper rightmost, but it’s hard to tell that upper right ...
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63 views

slip rate dependent friction - hyphen needed?

Should I put a hyphen for friction that depends on slip rate? Possibilities: slip rate-dependent friction or slip-rate dependent friction or slip rate dependent friction The last ...
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3answers
1k views

“A 1000-sqft room” vs. “a 1000 sq. ft. room”

Which of the following is correct? This is a 1000-sqft room This is a 1000 sq. ft. room Or perhaps neither is right and there's a better alternative?
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45 views

Multiple quantities of an object that has a descriptor and units of measure

My question is probably best illustrated with an example: Four 2.25 hp electric motors were used to propel the vehicle. Is that correct? I feel like it can't be, but my friend is saying ...
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310 views

Usage of hyphen when naming colors

When is it appropriate to use a hyphen when naming colors? For instance Blue-green has a dash but Teal blue does not. Is there some general English rule that applies?
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371 views

Is a hyphen required or is the proper use of it subjective?

My question is as stated in the title. In a very famous article, I noticed the author used the word - "nonexperiment". I looked up the word and it is not actually a word, so I believe it should be ...
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354 views

How to punctuate a range of hyphenated numbers? [duplicate]

What is the best way to punctuate a range of hyphenated numbers, e.g., sections 12-3 through 12-7? EDIT: Just to reply to those who marked this as a duplicate, I really fail to see how the post that ...
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2answers
574 views

Should you use en dashes in acronyms?

For terms like liquid chromatography–mass spectrometry that typically use an en dash rather than a hyphen, would an en dash still be used in the acronym, LC–MS? Or would we only need a hyphen there, ...
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2answers
1k views

Hyphenation in compound adjectives [duplicate]

Possible Duplicates: To hyphenate or not? When is it necessary to use a hyphen in writing a compound word? When is it appropriate to use a hyphen? In the sentence "Portland is known to ...
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2answers
39 views

Correct use of endash in range of minutes

I am currently working as a web developer, and will occasionally be asked to update a website. A "client" just send me an update containing this text: A 15-30-minute waiting-period is required ...
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1answer
48 views

Can I use hyphens after two separate words, using “and” as a connector?

I'm writing a Cover Letter and I'm including the following sentence: "Furthermore, I have a passion for dealing with- and meeting- new people." I recall an English professor suggesting something ...
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83 views

Hyphenation of “something-to-something”

I would like to know how to correctly hyphenate the phrase "something1-to-something2", where something2 is comprised of multiple words. To clarify, here is the example where something1 and something2 ...
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1answer
37 views

acceptable options when dropping and including hyphen in some phrases?

There are many commonly used phrases where hyphen is implicit and it's common to drop the hyphen. p1: computer based approach p2: computer-based approach p1 is where the hyphen is implicit and is ...
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125 views

Should “building blocks” be hyphenated? [duplicate]

Should "building blocks" be hyphenated? I am using the two words (or perhaps one word) as a noun. E.g., These axioms serve as the building-blocks of the English language. I understand that ...
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485 views

Consistent & accepted style(s) for hyphenating a shade of color used as an adjective for hair?

I'm helping edit a friend's book. Generally, I'm confident with my edits, yet one thing keeps nagging me. I'd appreciate expert guidance. In the book, some characters have shades of brown hair, e.g.: ...
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157 views

Nouns constructed out of an adjective and a suffix? [closed]

I experienced a bit of interesting language-building this past weekend. A post about "subtle -isms" (i.e. subtle sexism, subtle racism, etc.) had various commenters who used the phrase "subtle-ism" ...
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234 views

Is the first hyphen in “Anti- and pro-American”, “bi- and tri-monthy”, “country- and state-specific” correct? [duplicate]

Those prefixes "Anti", "bi" etc would look odd as separate words, but then, even complete words like "country" or "state" ending with a dangling hyphen look odd. So what is the correct rule for this? ...
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307 views

Hyphenation of a phrasal attributive with an open compound: “A B to C noun”

I'm wondering how to properly hyphenate (or en-dash) the following phrase: fiber optic to BNC converter That is to say, a device that converts "fiber optic" to BNC. If it didn't contain an open ...
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815 views

“Out-of-this-world experiences” vs. “out of this world experiences”

I was wondering if the hyphenated version should be used? The context is: Introducing the World Cup box from McDonald's: the meal filled with out of this world experiences.
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1k views

Sub-classification or subclassification? [closed]

We’re debating this at work. Merriam-Webster says it’s “subclassification”. Dictionary.Reference.com allows “sub-classification” and “subclassification” Is there a ‘more correct’ word to use? ...
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1answer
86 views

Game-development-oriented or game development-oriented? [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: How to connect a word and a phrase with a hyphen? “Hardware-counter-based tools” or “hardware-counter based tools”? As the title states, which is the correct hyphenation ...
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688 views

Usage of hyphens with numeric measurements

What is correct: two 1-Gb links; two 1 Gb links; or two 1Gb links? I suspect the first, however I do not know the name of this situation, which makes it difficult to for me to find via Google. I ...
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3answers
491 views

1D vs. one-dimensional vs. 1-dimensional?

In much of the scientific literature, the words 1D, one-dimensional, 1-dimensional, and 1-D occur frequently. Which of these is the best practice? Are there general principles for deciding which is ...
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881 views

Hyphenation of “prerequisite”

I'm proofreading my thesis, and found that TeX in its infinite wisdom had decided to hyphenate prerequisite as pre-req-ui-site. I've replaced it with pre-re-qui-si-te, but I'm a bit unsure what the ...
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119 views

“of the feudal Estates type” or “of the feudal-Estates type”?

In one Wikipedia page I read this definition: The zemsky sobor was the first Russian parliament of the feudal Estates type, in the 16th and 17th centuries. I don't understand, why is there ...
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19 views

Slashes for hyphens in compound modifiers

Take the phrase "a joint FBI-SFPD task force" for example. According to my boss, a slash can stand in for the hyphen. I tend to disagree. Is this grammatically correct? Stylistically acceptable?
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29 views

Use of apostrophe or hyphen in money amounts

I'm trying to write a sentence along the lines of "we ordered 200 pounds' worth of stuff", but using the pound sign rather than the word. Possible options: "£200 worth" "£200's worth" "£200-worth" ...
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36 views

Are 'short circuited' and 'short-circuited' both correct? [closed]

Are 'short circuited' and 'short-circuited' both correct? On some sites it is written as 'short circuited' ( http://www.physlink.com/Education/AskExperts/ae470.cfm ) and on some other sites it is ...
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5answers
2k views

What word to choose as the opposite of “self-aware”?

What word would describe the quality of not being self-aware? unselfaware unself-aware un-selfaware un-self-aware non-self-aware I am aware that it is allowed to have multiple hyphens in a word. ...
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3answers
1k views

Is it “re-offend” or “reoffend”? [closed]

I want to know whether there is a hyphen in the word re-offend, or if it is spelt reoffend. I looked in Oxford English dictionary and the word "reoffend" appears, but then I checked Merriam-Webster ...
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302 views

“All X-related things” / “All things X-related” / “All things X related”?

My French origins (probably?) would have me intuitively write “all X-related things”, but it seems usage favours the construct “all things X-related”, or even without a hyphen: “all things X related” ...
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1answer
175 views

Hyphenating/capitalizing values and coordinates

I'm translating some software from German (where there's a correct way for everything) into English (my native language, but also where I do so much more just by feeling) and I'm stumped by things ...
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30 views

Capitalisation of hyphenated words in title [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: Do you capitalize both parts of a hyphenated word in a title? I contribute to a journal with a policy of capitalisation of the article titles. My title is ...
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73 views

Hyphenating adjectives [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: To hyphenate or not? When is it appropriate to use a hyphen? In the phrase It is simply a large door sized wall of fire. Should "door sized" be hyphenated to ...
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0answers
56 views

Correct hyphenation of “ever-more-connected” [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: When is it necessary to use a hyphen in writing a compound word? What would be the correct way to hyphenate the phrase "ever-more-connected"? Does it even need hyphens? ...
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0answers
88 views

Is it appropriate to use a hyphen in compound adjectives? [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: When is it necessary to use a hyphen in writing a compound word? I've searched the web and "English Language & Usage", but am having problems finding the answer to ...
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1answer
68 views

Commas in a hyphenated series

I would like to make a statement to the effect of: The coating contains durable wind-, rain-, and chemical-resistant compounds. Can someone please provide guidance on the proper use of commas in ...
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2answers
569 views

“built-in to the library”: hyphen or no hyphen

http://web.mit.edu/galib/www/FeatureList.html says, "You can use the types built-in to the library (bit-string, array, list, tree) or derive a chromosome based on your own objects." I've sometimes ...
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199 views

Asymmetric hyphenation?

I want to talk about things being either “laminodental or apicodental”, but would rather avoid repeating “dental”. Omission of the second part of hyphenated compounds is straightforward (e.g., “user- ...
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15k views

Should the words “much needed” be hyphenated or not? [duplicate]

Here's an example of what I mean: "It's time for some much needed rest and relaxation." Or should it be: "It's time for some much-needed rest and relaxation."
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170 views

Does one capitalize “Portuguese” when used in a hyphenated adjective? [closed]

When Portuguese is used as part of a hyphenated adjective, does it take an initial capital letter? Just checking on this while proofreading an article. Examples: portuguese-speaking college ...
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3answers
192 views

Anti followed by phrase, usage of hyphen

See this headline Anti-police brutality march declared illegal, broken up I felt they should have written anti police-brutality or anti-police-brutality. Which one is more proper? Edit: It is ...