A hyphen is a symbol used to join two words or two syllables of a single word together. It is not to be confused with dashes or the minus symbol, as these are all longer than the hyphen and serve different purposes in language.

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Multiple hyphens make this phrase feel unwieldy… but are they right?

I'm writing a paper in which I refer to "natural-language-controlled robots" about thirty times. I'm curious about this phrase's hyphenation. I would write robots controlled by natural language ...
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2answers
69 views

How do you hyphenate 'luminous' over 2 verse lines, 'lumi-nous' or 'lumin-ous'? Help

How do you hyphenate 'luminous' over two verse lines, 'lumi-nous' or 'lumin-ous'? Help.
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1answer
96 views

Hypernym for injured and dead

I'm working on some project that deals with natural disasters. I need to find the most proper word that can be used to refer to someone who either was injured or died in a disaster. Can I use ...
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2answers
133 views

How to hyphenate “Churchill”?

How should "Churchill" be hyphenated when it breaks across two lines? Chu-rchill, Chur-chill, Churc-hill, or Church-ill?
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1answer
4k views

How to use hyphens appropriately when listing multiple hyphenated terms?

If multiple hyphenated terms share the same latter half, and I wish to list them without repeating that latter half, how should the hyphens be placed? For example: I will be investigating control ...
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1answer
11k views

Should the words “much needed” be hyphenated or not? [duplicate]

Here's an example of what I mean: "It's time for some much needed rest and relaxation." Or should it be: "It's time for some much-needed rest and relaxation."
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1answer
569 views

Is it preferable to generally use nested prepositional phrases or a hyphenated adjectival phrase?

I've recently run into some sticky situations involving how to write out complicated concept descriptions. Take this example: Which metrics are appropriate for evaluating the accuracy of a ...
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1answer
423 views

Hyphen in physical quantities before nouns?

In cases where a physical quantity (consisting of a number and a unit) is used like an adjective to describe a property of an object, should it be written with or without a hyphen between the number ...
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1answer
139 views

Is it good style to factor out the common root word of two (or more) prefixed compound words?

I see sometimes in conjunciton or disjunction, the common root of two or more compound words are factored out, for example, "super- and sub-script" (maybe bad example, but it suffices to describe the ...
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1answer
88 views

Sub edge, sub-edge or subedge?

In fields like geometry and numerical methods for solving differential equations we often use words like sub-face and sub-edge, referring to parts of a geometrical object. For instance, a cube has 6 ...
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2answers
501 views

Should you use en dashes in acronyms?

For terms like liquid chromatography–mass spectrometry that typically use an en dash rather than a hyphen, would an en dash still be used in the acronym, LC–MS? Or would we only need a hyphen there, ...
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2answers
8k views

reestablish vs. re-establish

Which form of this word is more appropriate for general use? I would expect someone to misread reestablish more often than re-establish, however it is more consistent in context with renew, ...
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2answers
9k views

Correct usage of “all expenses paid”

I am confused on how to properly describe an all expense paid vacation. Is it an all expenses paid vacation or an all expense paid vacation, and are there any hyphens between all, expense or ...
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3answers
1k views

Slash or hyphen in constructions that imply a combination?

Would you use hyphens or slashes in constructions that imply a combination? Examples: A yard group / yard steering conflict (meaning a conflict between a yard group and yard steering) A building ...
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1answer
170 views

How many hyphens are appropriate in “Vietnam war veteran turned performing artist Joe Smith”? [duplicate]

How many hyphens should there be in this phrase? Vietnam war veteran turned performing artist Joe Smith
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1answer
690 views

Is it “interest free” or “interest-free” when describing a loan without an interest rate? [duplicate]

I watched a clip a show shown on TruTV about a woman who was angry about not having been offered free cash for thirty days. According to the receptionist in the financial services place she was in, ...
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1answer
473 views

How do I write 'first and second order' properly?

I am writing about first-order and second-order quantities. Should I put one hyphen, as in "first and second-order", or two, as in "first- and second-order". Or should I do something ...
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2answers
91 views

“Multi-column” or “multicolumn”? [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: To hyphenate or not? Which is the proper one? I mainly use this term in computer terminology, like "grid multicolumn sorting".
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3answers
11k views

'Sort out' or 'sought out', which one is correct? [closed]

I was reading an apology letter of Shirley Hornestein and found it very interesting: For as long as I can remember, I have been lying. From the simple white lies, to the ...
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2answers
518 views

Hyphenation of non-combat-related injury

As I understand it, we are to hyphenate phrases which consist of several adjectives strung together to form a single thought. I would, therefore, assume "non-combat-related injury" is the proper ...
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2answers
1k views

When to use a hyphen to coin a new word and when to omit a hyphen?

Someone has asked for answer to these topics. However, I still want someone to provide me with simple and universal answers. I recently read a sentence from the English-speaking person. It is in an ...
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1answer
83 views

Game-development-oriented or game development-oriented? [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: How to connect a word and a phrase with a hyphen? “Hardware-counter-based tools” or “hardware-counter based tools”? As the title states, which is the correct hyphenation ...
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1answer
1k views

Hyphenation and capitalization of “Great-Uncle” when signing books to my nephew's son

When great-uncle is used as a common noun, the hyphen and lack of caps make sense. However, when I sign a book to my nephew, is it Great-Uncle Don, Great-uncle Don, or perhaps Great Uncle Don?
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2answers
279 views

Is it acceptable to italicize a compound descriptor instead of hyphenating it?

I'm having a disagreement about how to treat a compound descriptor like "This is one of those everyone-shut-up-and-go-away kind of days." It has been claimed to me that this descriptor can just as ...
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0answers
29 views

Capitalisation of hyphenated words in title [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: Do you capitalize both parts of a hyphenated word in a title? I contribute to a journal with a policy of capitalisation of the article titles. My title is ...
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1answer
1k views

Hyphen usage. Mono-channel and multi-channel or monochannel and multichannel? [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: When is it necessary to use a hyphen in writing a compound word? While writing a technical paper about fiber optics this question about hyphens came out. Should this ...
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2answers
825 views

Should a hyphen be used when constructing words using suffixes such as “-ly” and “-wise” when the resulting word isn't in the dictionary?

Should a hyphen be used when constructing words using suffixes such as -ly and -wise when the resulting word isn't in the dictionary? For example: money-wise moneywise Which one is better?
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4answers
372 views

Is it usual to use “full-cry” as a stand-alone adjective?

Maureen Dowd’s article titled “Spellbound by Blondes, Hot and Icy” appearing in December 1st NY-Times jumps from Alfred Hitchcock’s favor of blonde actresses to the dispute of Hillary Clinton’s ...
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1answer
716 views

Hyphenation or blending

Are there any rules when to write a set of two (or more) words or abbreviations forming a name of some entity as separate, when to hyphenate, and when to stick them together? These are my findings ...
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2answers
411 views

Should “no longer” have a hyphen?

I have always put a hyphen in the fragment "no-longer X", but neither the BBC website or the Economist seem to put one in. I always thought that The piece of string was no longer than five inches. ...
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0answers
42 views

Proper punctuation of “three to five page essay” [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: How to write dashes in “a 2-4-room-apartment”? Which is the best way to write the quotation in the Question Title using numbers? 3–5-page essay 3 to 5-page essay 3–5 ...
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3answers
316 views

Is it “thousands of postmen and women” or “thousands of postmen and -women”?

Is it "thousands of postmen and women" or "thousands of postmen and -women"? Is the use of a hyphen correct in the latter case?
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1answer
2k views

When to hyphenate open-form compound nouns [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: How do I hyphenate an open-form compound word with another that should be hyphenated? I am taking an editing course, and the instructor said that the following phrase ...
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1answer
2k views

When adding prefixes to noun phrases, should you hyphenate? [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: When is it necessary to use a hyphen in writing a compound word? Using “non-” to prefix a two-word phrase When adding a prefix to a noun, I've been taught to usually ...
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2answers
2k views

“On or off campus” vs. “On- or off-campus” vs. “On-campus or off-campus”

It does not matter if a student lives __ as ... I'm writing a formal report. Which of the following should I use to fill in the blank? Which one is correct and more formal and looks/sounds ...
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2answers
585 views

Usage of hyphens with numeric measurements

What is correct: two 1-Gb links; two 1 Gb links; or two 1Gb links? I suspect the first, however I do not know the name of this situation, which makes it difficult to for me to find via Google. I ...
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1answer
138 views

Why does the writer use multiple hyphens? [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: Is a lengthy combination of words with hyphens like “the worst not-technically-in-a-recession year in American history” a new fashion of writing? But I have found ...
2
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1answer
7k views

“40-50 years old” vs. “40-50 year olds” when referring to a group

In formal research, which is more correct, and why: the group of 40-50 years old OR the group of 40-50 year olds In any case the phrase in bold is to be treated as a noun only, as in: The ...
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3answers
374 views

1D vs. one-dimensional vs. 1-dimensional?

In much of the scientific literature, the words 1D, one-dimensional, 1-dimensional, and 1-D occur frequently. Which of these is the best practice? Are there general principles for deciding which is ...
2
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2answers
1k views

Hyphens after the prefixes “non-” and “anti-” in mathematics

Is there a convention when to attach the prefixes non- and anti- to mathematical terms using a hyphen and when without? One uses non-zero but also noncommutative. Likewise for anti-. I no longer ...
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1answer
6k views

Should I say “3 half days” or “3 half-days” or “3 half-day”?

Should I say "3 half days" or "3 half-days" or "3 half-day"? I mean I want to refer to, for example, the a.m. of Monday, the p.m. of Wednesday, and the a.m. of Friday, together.
4
votes
1answer
592 views

Breaking last word in the lines [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: What are the rules for splitting words at the end of a line? In printed texts, especially those with narrow columns, it's necessary from time to time to divide the last ...
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2answers
3k views

Hyphens in verb construction containing prefix such as “re”

In semi-formal business writing in the United States, I often observe that writers tend to add a hyphen between a prefix and the root infinitive of verbs. In many of the cases, the resulting verb ...
2
votes
1answer
883 views

Using hyphen and quote marks in composed term? [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: When is it necessary to use a hyphen in writing a compound word? I want to write a term composed out of multiple words, and I would like to know whether I have to use ...
23
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7answers
2k views

Is a lengthy combination of words with hyphens like “the worst not-technically-in-a-recession year in American history” a new fashion of writing?

I found a hyphenated word , “not-technically–in-a-recession” in the sentence of September 28 New York Times’ article titled “Why Obama Is Winning,” written by co-ed columnist, Ross Douthat. It reads: ...
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2answers
2k views

Should “forty-year” in this context be hyphenated? [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: Pluralization rule for “five-year-old children”, “20 pound note”, “10 mile run” Mr. Willow’s more than forty-year experience in ...
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2answers
146 views

“Inward-pointing” or “inward pointing” [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: When is it necessary to use a hyphen in writing a compound word? To hyphenate or not? Which one is correct? The normal vector we mean is the inward-pointing ...
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1answer
150 views

Hyphenation “kinetic”

What is the correct hyphenation of "kinetic" (if it matters in British English). I found two possibilities: ki-net-ic (/kə-ˈne-tik/) in the Merriam Webster (which might be US English) and ...
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2answers
3k views

What's the double hyphen after greetings in emails?

I usually see just format in the emails I receive daily: Hello Dorian-- I'm calling you in regard with the something... Thanks, I see comma after the greetings too but I am not sure ...
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0answers
37 views

husband-and-wife team or husband and wife team? [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: When is it necessary to use a hyphen in writing a compound word? Referring to a sentence from an online magazine: "Lonely Planet was started in 1975, when the British ...