A hyphen is a symbol used to join two words or two syllables of a single word together. It is not to be confused with dashes or the minus symbol, as these are all longer than the hyphen and serve different purposes in language.

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Repetition of hyphen in shared prefixes [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: Can a hyphen be used without anything on the right side? I'm trying to discuss types of semiconductor, there is P-type and N-type. Assuming my hyphenation is correct, ...
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1answer
1k views

When to use -, – and —? [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: When should I use an em-dash, an en-dash, and a hyphen? This is about hyphens (-), en-dashes (–) and em-dashes (—). When to use which one? To be honest, I always use ...
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5answers
2k views

Is it normal to separate hyphenated words on different lines? [duplicate]

I'm typing in Microsoft Word, and it automatically separated the word T-shirt when it ran out of room: blah blah blah, Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, I have a T- shirt leaving just the letter "T" ...
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3answers
3k views

“Stand up comedy”, “standup comedy”, or “stand-up comedy”?

I've seen all three versions for describing a person on stage performing comedy: "stand up", "standup", and "stand-up". My guess is that the term started as two words, but as the performance form ...
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4answers
12k views

Do I keep myself “up-to-date” or “up to date” on something?

Question is quite straightforward. I want to say that "I keep myself up-to-date on the latest technology". Or is it better "I keep myself up to date with the latest technology"? Thanks
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1answer
324 views

Approximating Fancy Punctuation

Is it ever okay (or acceptable in modern casual usage) to approximate an ellipse glyph '…' with three full-stops '...' or spaced full-stops '. . .'? The textbooks say you shouldn't, ...
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3answers
9k views

Should it be “mid 80s” or “mid-80s”?

When discussing temperatures or decades, should it be hyphenated? I understood that two-word adjectives need to be hyphenated, but why does MS Word think this should be, too?
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4answers
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Should anti- and counterclockwise be hyphenated?

I've got a document in which I'm defining counterclockwise and mentioning that it is sometimes also called anti-clockwise. The document is in American English, and generally in line with the Chicago ...
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2answers
137 views

“Year olds” or “year-olds”

I am writing about some leadership stuff, and I am trying to say that I am leading the 14-15 year old boys. How do I correctly use year-olds as in, "I was the adviser to the 14-15 year-olds." Thanks ...
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1answer
294 views

Should I hyphenate “up-to-the-minute” in this case?

I have had a look at some examples on here, but I am still not sure. Should I hyphenate "up-to-the-minute" in this sentence? We can supply you with up-to-the-minute intelligence on distributors, ...
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3answers
2k views

Should I use a hyphen in the term “in(-)situ visualization”?

The term in(-)situ visualization denotes a visualization or graphics that is depicted in place, for instance, a sparkline that is embedded into text. As the dictionaries tell, the adjective or adverb ...
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2answers
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“Reset” or “re-set”?

As far as I know there are two different meanings of the word "reset": to restore an object/value to a previous/initial state - that's the most widely use of the word;  to set the value/state a ...
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1answer
2k views

“How-to” or “how to” in reference to tutorial [closed]

Should I refer to a tutorial as a how-to or a how to? Is there a grammatical rule for this?
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1answer
120 views

Does conjugation reduction require a hyphen in the affected words?

In a sentence where we have two listed words that are hyphenated, we can omit the latter part of the first compound and still be grammatically correct: I don't believe we will ever find ...
3
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1answer
159 views

Hyphenation of the word “interferometer” in British English

How is the word "interferometer" correctly split at the end of a line in British English, i.e. what is the correct syllabification? I found two contradicting syllabifications: "in·ter·fer·om·e·ter" ...
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1answer
2k views

Should “pseudo” words be hyphenated?

While this question talks about the meaning of the word "pseudo", I'm wondering what the rules are for hyphenating words that start with this prefix. For example, would it be correct to call ...
3
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1answer
145 views

Non-preemptive? Non-pre-emptive? Emptive?

We can describe something as pre-emptive, no issue there. If something isn't such, how can we write that? Word gives me red squiggles on 'Non-preemptive', but this looks silly with a double ...
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2answers
9k views

Correct usage of “all expenses paid”

I am confused on how to properly describe an all expense paid vacation. Is it an all expenses paid vacation or an all expense paid vacation, and are there any hyphens between all, expense or ...
3
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1answer
485 views

In “type of guy” constructions, do you use hyphens or not? For example [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: To hyphenate or not? "Did you see this silly poll? It says that if I were a superhero, I would be Captain America." "Really? I don't know; I see you as more of a ...
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2answers
761 views

Hyphenation of parameter(s)

How is parameter(s) hyphenated in UK English? pa-ram-e-ter (Merriam-Webster) or pa-rame-ter (Word XP) or para-met-er (TCItex) or para-meter (OAL Dictionary) or pa-ra-me-ter (seems to bee the ...
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1answer
247 views

Are the hyphens necessary in “hard-to-find” or can they go without? [duplicate]

Is it necessary to hyphenate the words "hard-to-find" together when referring to things which have a property of being not readily located? Example: Adam locates hard-to-find items.
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4answers
5k views

Can “nighttime” be used instead of “night-time”?

I forgot where but I saw the word "night-time" written like "nighttime". Now is that correct or accepted? Can it be written as a single word? I am specifically concerned about British usage. I did ...
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3answers
5k views

How does the hyphen change the meaning in expressions like “high performance” and “high-performance”?

I'm wondering about the distinction between expressions like "high performance" and "high-performance", or "high level" and "high-level" and other similar pairs of words which are sometimes used with ...
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3answers
316 views

Is it “thousands of postmen and women” or “thousands of postmen and -women”?

Is it "thousands of postmen and women" or "thousands of postmen and -women"? Is the use of a hyphen correct in the latter case?
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1answer
800 views

Does one use a hyphen in between 'other' and 'hand' when saying “on the other hand”?

When I was typing this sentence "And on the other hand, some user actions don't trigger the same response." my spell checker mentioned that I might put a hyphen between 'other' and 'hand' and use ...
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2answers
1k views

Hyphens after the prefixes “non-” and “anti-” in mathematics

Is there a convention when to attach the prefixes non- and anti- to mathematical terms using a hyphen and when without? One uses non-zero but also noncommutative. Likewise for anti-. I no longer ...
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2answers
2k views

Hiscore vs Highscore [closed]

Which of these are correct? Hiscore Hi-score Highscore High-score I have seen all except the last being used.
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1answer
190 views

Property of “doesn't-pass-the-laugh-test”

What kind of property does doesn’t-pass-the-laugh-test have in the expression which escalates unreliability to the doesn’t-pass-the-laugh-test level taken from this article? Is it an adjective ...
2
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1answer
53 views

“n-degenerate” or “n degenerate”?

In physics, we say that something is "degenerate" when it exists in more than one "equivalent" versions. What is the proper form of saying that there are n versions of X -- that X is "n-degenerate" or ...
2
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4answers
2k views

What's up with the hyphen in “orang-utan”?

For most of my life 'till about a couple of years ago, I had only seen the spelling orangutan written to describe those delightful red-headed apes from the tropical forests of Borneo. Lately, though, ...
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2answers
12k views

Usage of hyphen in “oft-cited”

The oft-cited first sentence of this work Why would you not just use two words, oft cited?
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2answers
312 views

Should there be a hyphen in 're-rate'?

If you have already rated something and then you want to rate it again, what is the correct term? Rerate or Re-rate?
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1answer
548 views

“30 day span”, “30-day span”, or “30 days span”

As in, "for each 30-day span, a late fee will be charged." I think the hyphenated version looks best, but is there some sort of authoritative word on that in a style guide?
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2answers
69 views

How do you hyphenate 'luminous' over 2 verse lines, 'lumi-nous' or 'lumin-ous'? Help

How do you hyphenate 'luminous' over two verse lines, 'lumi-nous' or 'lumin-ous'? Help.
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1answer
7k views

“40-50 years old” vs. “40-50 year olds” when referring to a group

In formal research, which is more correct, and why: the group of 40-50 years old OR the group of 40-50 year olds In any case the phrase in bold is to be treated as a noun only, as in: The ...
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1answer
8k views

What is the proper hyphenation of “and a half” in the context of age? [duplicate]

I'm trying to write "3 and a half year old," as in, "He is a 3 and a half year old dog". I know a hyphen or two is supposed to go in there somewhere. Per Ways to write "2000 year old" , ...
2
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2answers
8k views

reestablish vs. re-establish

Which form of this word is more appropriate for general use? I would expect someone to misread reestablish more often than re-establish, however it is more consistent in context with renew, ...
2
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2answers
279 views

Is it acceptable to italicize a compound descriptor instead of hyphenating it?

I'm having a disagreement about how to treat a compound descriptor like "This is one of those everyone-shut-up-and-go-away kind of days." It has been claimed to me that this descriptor can just as ...
2
votes
2answers
825 views

Should a hyphen be used when constructing words using suffixes such as “-ly” and “-wise” when the resulting word isn't in the dictionary?

Should a hyphen be used when constructing words using suffixes such as -ly and -wise when the resulting word isn't in the dictionary? For example: money-wise moneywise Which one is better?
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1answer
6k views

Should I say “3 half days” or “3 half-days” or “3 half-day”?

Should I say "3 half days" or "3 half-days" or "3 half-day"? I mean I want to refer to, for example, the a.m. of Monday, the p.m. of Wednesday, and the a.m. of Friday, together.
2
votes
1answer
288 views

Parentheses vs. commas vs. hyphen or dash in a list of people

In a list of people published in a bulletin, which is correct? We continue in prayer for: Amy B.(cancer), T. Jones(nephew of Tim), Lillie (on the death of her brother), Sally(Nursing Home), ...
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2answers
5k views

When is it appropriate to use a hyphen? [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: To hyphenate or not? What is the proper way to spell "side dish"? Is it: "side dish" or "side-dish"? Also, Is it "ham-fried" or "ham fried"? Basically, when do you use ...
2
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2answers
99 views

Hyphenation of “left hand side”

I would like to know exactly where (or whether) "the right hand side", "the left hand wall", etc. should be hyphenated.
2
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1answer
10k views

Do I use timeslot or time slot or time-slot?

As in "the timeslot given to completing the task". Would also be interested to hear if there's different usages for different scenarios.
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3answers
1k views

Slash or hyphen in constructions that imply a combination?

Would you use hyphens or slashes in constructions that imply a combination? Examples: A yard group / yard steering conflict (meaning a conflict between a yard group and yard steering) A building ...
2
votes
2answers
518 views

Hyphenation of non-combat-related injury

As I understand it, we are to hyphenate phrases which consist of several adjectives strung together to form a single thought. I would, therefore, assume "non-combat-related injury" is the proper ...
2
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1answer
968 views

More dastardly dashes: what are the 'horizontal bar' and 'figure dash' characters for? [closed]

Having read another excellent answer regarding the use of horizontal line-like characters, I'm interested to know the meanings of the horizontal bar and figure dash. In the other answer linked above, ...
2
votes
1answer
346 views

When to spell out non-alphanumeric characters?

If a term contains non-alphanumeric characters, when (if ever) should these characters be spelled out? For example: C++   written as   C Plus Plus ...
2
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1answer
252 views

Doubly hyphenated words

Consider the word quasi-first-class. Are the hyphens used correctly? Should the two hyphens be of different length to denote the distinction of the hyphenation? Is there a general rule to deal with ...
2
votes
2answers
346 views

Pronunciation of “-” sign, particularly in Unix commands

While talking about commands for command-line interface, I sometimes need to pronounce how command should be typed, like this one: nc -l -p 1234 I used to pronounce - sign in this context as a ...