A hyphen is a symbol used to join two words or two syllables of a single word together. It is not to be confused with dashes or the minus symbol, as these are all longer than the hyphen and serve different purposes in language.

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6
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5answers
768 views

“object-oriented” vs “object oriented”

When should we use "object-oriented" and when "object oriented" when talking about programming? An example: Why should I start writing object oriented code? I personally think that there should ...
2
votes
2answers
283 views

Should there be a hyphen in 're-rate'?

If you have already rated something and then you want to rate it again, what is the correct term? Rerate or Re-rate?
3
votes
1answer
259 views

Should I hyphenate “up-to-the-minute” in this case?

I have had a look at some examples on here, but I am still not sure. Should I hyphenate "up-to-the-minute" in this sentence? We can supply you with up-to-the-minute intelligence on distributors, ...
2
votes
1answer
215 views

Use of hyphens when qualifying a noun

I am editing a bit of text, and I need to know: should there be a hyphen in the following passage? "While transecting the designated territory, survey-team members collected numerous artifacts." ...
2
votes
1answer
207 views

how do I use a hyphen when defining an acronym in the middle of the term?

Example: "Metropolitan Statistical Area (MSA) level unemployment" I need a hyphen between "Area" and "level". Later in the document the term appears as "MSA-level". Should it be: "Metropolitan ...
1
vote
1answer
186 views

“All X-related things” / “All things X-related” / “All things X related”?

My French origins (probably?) would have me intuitively write “all X-related things”, but it seems usage favours the construct “all things X-related”, or even without a hyphen: “all things X related” ...
7
votes
4answers
1k views

Compound Adjectives and -ed

A colleague asked me this question, and I couldn't come up with an answer that satisfied him, so I'm wondering if anyone can help: Why does a man with a short temper become a short-tempered man? In ...
3
votes
1answer
111 views

Does conjugation reduction require a hyphen in the affected words?

In a sentence where we have two listed words that are hyphenated, we can omit the latter part of the first compound and still be grammatically correct: I don't believe we will ever find ...
2
votes
1answer
433 views

“30 day span”, “30-day span”, or “30 days span”

As in, "for each 30-day span, a late fee will be charged." I think the hyphenated version looks best, but is there some sort of authoritative word on that in a style guide?
1
vote
3answers
185 views

Was “nowadays” ever spelled with hyphens?

etymonline doesn't note that nowadays ever had a spelling with hyphen but I found a few random sites claiming that it once was hyphenated. Was it ever spelled as "now-a-days"?
1
vote
1answer
195 views

Hyphenate “powers that be” when used as object?

Here's part of my sentence: "I'm going to ask the powers that be whether[...]" Should it be "I'm going to ask the powers-that-be whether[...]"? Bonus points for why, of course..
1
vote
1answer
130 views

Hyphenating/capitalizing values and coordinates

I'm translating some software from German (where there's a correct way for everything) into English (my native language, but also where I do so much more just by feeling) and I'm stumped by things ...
1
vote
2answers
606 views

What is the difference between “in-between” and “in between”?

Which of the following two is correct: The man is sitting in between the two women; or The man is sitting in-between the two women. ? What is the general rule? Related but different ...
1
vote
3answers
986 views

Correct use of hyphens in “we offer same day, on site service calls”

What would be the correct hyphenation (if any) for the following sentence? We offer same day, on site service calls. I was thinking of hyphenating "on-site", but I cannot think why "same day" ...
2
votes
1answer
348 views

Is “teen-ager” correct? Still used? Etymology?

I was reading an article in The New York Times published in 1990 and came across the spelling of teenager as 'teen-ager'; is this American spelling? Archaic? The young man, who often said he only ...
0
votes
1answer
213 views

use of hyphen to apply an adjective to non-hyphenated compound word

Do I write "non-power of two" or "non-power-of-two", where I assume "power of two" is a non-hyphenated compound word?
2
votes
2answers
1k views

Correct hyphenation for conjunction of hyphenated compound adjectives

Consider the following sentence: The labour-intensive and time-intensive part starts tomorrow. I want to write this without rewriting the word "intensive." Is this the correct way to do it? ...
0
votes
1answer
180 views

Compounds involving compounds [duplicate]

Consider the following use of a hyphen: There are many bear-like animals. Now, how does the hyphenation change if "bear" is replaced by "grizzly bear"? Which of the following would be ...
2
votes
3answers
630 views

Noun phrase converted to verb, is a hyphen needed?

When "air kiss" is treated as a verb, as in "they air kissed", should it be hyphenated to "air-kissed"?
1
vote
2answers
238 views

To hyphen or not: cat person-turned-dog person vs. cat person turned dog person

Would it be: I'm a cat-person-turned-cat-and-dog-person. I'm a cat person-turned-cat and dog person. I'm a cat-person turned cat-and-dog person.
3
votes
1answer
155 views

Hyphenation of the word “interferometer” in British English

How is the word "interferometer" correctly split at the end of a line in British English, i.e. what is the correct syllabification? I found two contradicting syllabifications: "in·ter·fer·om·e·ter" ...
1
vote
2answers
155 views

Asymmetric hyphenation?

I want to talk about things being either “laminodental or apicodental”, but would rather avoid repeating “dental”. Omission of the second part of hyphenated compounds is straightforward (e.g., “user- ...
0
votes
2answers
417 views

Complex compound adjective (adverbial phrase + participle)

A relative of mine and I have hit a brick wall in trying to agree on the grammaticality and stylistic suitability of one his sentences: However, it proved incapable of jeopardizing the ...
-1
votes
1answer
721 views

How to hyphenate “right mouse click”

What's the proper way to hyphenate the expression "right mouse click". I'm writing documentation for some software I wrote. "Please right mouse click on ...".
1
vote
2answers
257 views

How to punctuate a range of hyphenated numbers? [duplicate]

What is the best way to punctuate a range of hyphenated numbers, e.g., sections 12-3 through 12-7? EDIT: Just to reply to those who marked this as a duplicate, I really fail to see how the post that ...
0
votes
2answers
727 views

The use of hyphen in consecutive compounds [duplicate]

I am not that punctuation-savy, so I have one question for my research title. Currently it is Social crowdfunding: individual- and project-related determinants of success. Empirical ...
0
votes
1answer
406 views

Hyphen omission: a matter of habit or plain error?

I'm not a native English speaker so I'm struggling to get this right. I understand (and this question confirms) that compound adjectives such as well-organized, high-level, Spanish-speaking, etc, ...
1
vote
4answers
465 views

Is “inbuilt” a word? Is it alright to use it or should I use “built in”?

I searched and found this: “Built-in” or “In-built”, which says inbuilt is fine. But in a reddit comment, I was told that I should use built in instead of inbuilt. Which is correct? I am using the ...
0
votes
1answer
320 views

Subtask vs sub-task vs sub task

We provide tests for candidates. Each test consists of several tasks. Each task may consist of several subtasks / sub-tasks / sub tasks? So far we've used all these terms both internally and in ...
1
vote
2answers
253 views

hyphenation of adjective phrases [duplicate]

Should adjectival phrases that are hyphenated when they modify a noun, e.g. a case-sensitive password, be hyphenated when they are predicate adjectives, e.g. The password is case-sensitive?
0
votes
1answer
300 views

To make a noun to describe everything that is known well, would it be 'the well-known'?

Does the hyphen belong there? Thanks!
1
vote
3answers
564 views

“Out-of-this-world experiences” vs. “out of this world experiences”

I was wondering if the hyphenated version should be used? The context is: Introducing the World Cup box from McDonald's: the meal filled with out of this world experiences.
4
votes
1answer
368 views

Non-obvious or nonobvious?

I've seen both, even in the same Wikipedia article entry. Is there a right and wrong version, or is either version OK as long as I'm consistent? I'm using the word in the context of patent law, as in ...
0
votes
2answers
2k views

Which is correct: 'pass-through' or 'passthrough' or 'pass through'? [closed]

Which is correct: pass-through or passthrough or pass through? I googled to find the correct wording, but found the 3 and not sure at all what is the correct one and/or there is a some domain ...
0
votes
3answers
248 views

Hyphens within decades

Should there be a hyphen in the sentence, early '80s or should it be written without the hyphen between early and '80s?
4
votes
1answer
1k views

Does one hyphenate height when given in feet and inches?

In a work of fiction I'm writing, I'm using the colloquial phrase five-one to refer to someone's height. Should that be hyphenated as five-one, or should it just be written woth a space separating the ...
5
votes
2answers
2k views

When describing something's colour, would you hyphenate the words? Eg, “blood-red” versus “royal blue”

Generally, as a rule, I always hyphenate words to make them into a single adjective, so I've been putting "blood-red", "forest-green", "royal-blue" and the like, but the moment I typed "royal-blue", ...
-3
votes
1answer
869 views

If it's cost-efficient, would it be cost-efficiency?

Dictionary.com is showing cost-efficiency, but New York Times shows "cost efficiency." Sentence would be: ... our track record for timeliness and cost-efficiency. I feel like it should have no ...
3
votes
1answer
298 views

Approximating Fancy Punctuation

Is it ever okay (or acceptable in modern casual usage) to approximate an ellipse glyph '…' with three full-stops '...' or spaced full-stops '. . .'? The textbooks say you shouldn't, ...
3
votes
2answers
311 views

What's the logic behind adjectives constructed with a hyphen?

I'll give you a lovecraftian stanza: Thro’ the ghoul-guarded gateways of slumber, Past the wan-moon’d abysses of night, I have liv’d o’er my lives without number, I have sounded all things ...
3
votes
3answers
2k views

Should I use a hyphen in the term “in(-)situ visualization”?

The term in(-)situ visualization denotes a visualization or graphics that is depicted in place, for instance, a sparkline that is embedded into text. As the dictionaries tell, the adjective or adverb ...
1
vote
1answer
848 views

Sub-classification or subclassification? [closed]

We’re debating this at work. Merriam-Webster says it’s “subclassification”. Dictionary.Reference.com allows “sub-classification” and “subclassification” Is there a ‘more correct’ word to use? ...
0
votes
0answers
18 views

Writing double voiced vowels [duplicate]

I have a pretty straight forwards question I think. Of the following three spellings, which one is generally accepted as correct (I've seen them all, well, something like it) reemerge re-emerge ...
4
votes
3answers
153 views

Multiple hyphens make this phrase feel unwieldy… but are they right?

I'm writing a paper in which I refer to "natural-language-controlled robots" about thirty times. I'm curious about this phrase's hyphenation. I would write robots controlled by natural language ...
2
votes
2answers
69 views

How do you hyphenate 'luminous' over 2 verse lines, 'lumi-nous' or 'lumin-ous'? Help

How do you hyphenate 'luminous' over two verse lines, 'lumi-nous' or 'lumin-ous'? Help.
0
votes
1answer
95 views

Hypernym for injured and dead

I'm working on some project that deals with natural disasters. I need to find the most proper word that can be used to refer to someone who either was injured or died in a disaster. Can I use ...
1
vote
2answers
128 views

How to hyphenate “Churchill”?

How should "Churchill" be hyphenated when it breaks across two lines? Chu-rchill, Chur-chill, Churc-hill, or Church-ill?
4
votes
1answer
4k views

How to use hyphens appropriately when listing multiple hyphenated terms?

If multiple hyphenated terms share the same latter half, and I wish to list them without repeating that latter half, how should the hyphens be placed? For example: I will be investigating control ...
1
vote
1answer
9k views

Should the words “much needed” be hyphenated or not? [duplicate]

Here's an example of what I mean: "It's time for some much needed rest and relaxation." Or should it be: "It's time for some much-needed rest and relaxation."
2
votes
1answer
541 views

Is it preferable to generally use nested prepositional phrases or a hyphenated adjectival phrase?

I've recently run into some sticky situations involving how to write out complicated concept descriptions. Take this example: Which metrics are appropriate for evaluating the accuracy of a ...