A hyphen is a symbol used to join two words or two syllables of a single word together. It is not to be confused with dashes or the minus symbol, as these are all longer than the hyphen and serve different purposes in language.

learn more… | top users | synonyms (2)

0
votes
2answers
31 views

How do you capitalize and hyphenate “at a glance” in a title?

I'd like to use the following as a section title: Module At-a-Glance Is it capitalized and punctuated properly?
0
votes
0answers
24 views

Is this phrase “2- or 4-person” correct?

When listing a numerical hyphenation...,for example "2- or 4-person", does the first number have a unconnected hyphen? What is the general rule?
0
votes
0answers
17 views

“state lattice-based motion planner” or “state-lattice based motion planner” ? [duplicate]

Which one in the following groups is correct respectively? (1) state lattice-based motion planner state-lattice based motion planner (2) spatiotemporal sampling-based planning method ...
2
votes
2answers
67 views

Pronunciation of “-” sign, particularly in Unix commands

While talking about commands for command-line interface, I sometimes need to pronounce how command should be typed, like this one: nc -l -p 1234 I used to pronounce - sign in this context as a ...
0
votes
0answers
21 views

Separate vs. joined words (hyphen or not) [duplicate]

English is not my native language, and sometimes it's confusing.. Especially uk-english vs. american and hyphens Can someone explain a bit when to use which of these? It's for a global english ...
-1
votes
1answer
36 views

What’s the correct hyphenation in “trying to be a decision maker”?

Which of these three ways of writing it is right: decision maker (a space separates the two pieces) decision-maker (a hyphen separates the two pieces) decisionmaker (nothing separates the two ...
1
vote
1answer
57 views

Consistent & accepted style(s) for hyphenating a shade of color used as an adjective for hair?

I'm helping edit a friend's book. Generally, I'm confident with my edits, yet one thing keeps nagging me. I'd appreciate expert guidance. In the book, some characters have shades of brown hair, e.g.: ...
0
votes
2answers
69 views

Does one capitalize “Portuguese” when used in a hyphenated adjective? [closed]

When Portuguese is used as part of a hyphenated adjective, does it take an initial capital letter? Just checking on this while proofreading an article. Examples: portuguese-speaking college ...
3
votes
1answer
58 views

Are the hyphens necessary in “hard-to-find” or can they go without? [duplicate]

Is it necessary to hyphenate the words "hard-to-find" together when referring to things which have a property of being not readily located? Example: Adam locates hard-to-find items.
0
votes
1answer
51 views

Is “two-thirds” or “two thirds” correct? [duplicate]

I just recently answered a question related to how much water was filled in a glass. I answered "two thirds" but the answer was wrong because in the key answer book it was "two-thirds". Please tell me ...
1
vote
2answers
64 views

How should one punctuate “upper right most”?

For upper right most, I’ve seen it written upper-right most, upper-right-most, and with no hyphens at all. What makes the most sense to me is upper rightmost, but it’s hard to tell that upper right ...
0
votes
0answers
53 views

What is anti-money and how do I launder it? [duplicate]

So the phrase "anti-money laundering" has an obvious meaning, referring to something or some process that acts against the laundering of money. However, I find the use of the hyphen slightly ...
1
vote
2answers
27 views

slip rate dependent friction - hyphen needed?

Should I put a hyphen for friction that depends on slip rate? Possibilities: slip rate-dependent friction or slip-rate dependent friction or slip rate dependent friction The last ...
0
votes
2answers
56 views

Confusion over the general rules governing the use of the hyphen in English [duplicate]

I often get confused by the rules for using hyphens. According to this entry from the Oxford Dictionaries web site, I must always use a hyphen in these cases: Hyphens are used in many compound ...
1
vote
2answers
42 views

Do we need hyphen in this: graded-reading books?

Is it necessary to have a hyphen in the following phrase? graded-reading books Please my friends you are only hope for me at a last chance salon because my teacher he is not knowing answer.
1
vote
1answer
78 views

Nouns constructed out of an adjective and a suffix? [closed]

I experienced a bit of interesting language-building this past weekend. A post about "subtle -isms" (i.e. subtle sexism, subtle racism, etc.) had various commenters who used the phrase "subtle-ism" ...
1
vote
3answers
75 views

“A 1000-sqft room” vs. “a 1000 sq. ft. room”

Which of the following is correct? This is a 1000-sqft room This is a 1000 sq. ft. room Or perhaps neither is right and there's a better alternative?
0
votes
2answers
85 views

Less-experienced vs less experienced employee

As an Android developer with 3 years of experience, I also help less experienced team members. Do I need to put a hyphen between "less" and "experienced"?
1
vote
4answers
87 views

Do I keep myself “up-to-date” or “up to date” on something?

Question is quite straightforward. I want to say that "I keep myself up-to-date on the latest technology". Or is it better "I keep myself up to date with the latest technology"? Thanks
0
votes
1answer
84 views

Should one suspend a hyphen when using “two- to three-digit” phrase used as an adjective? [closed]

Example Sally alerted her accountant to four to five digit revenue discrepancies in the budget. Should it be: ...to four to five digit revenue discrepancies or with a suspended hyphen: ...
0
votes
1answer
66 views

Use of the en dash instead of the hyphen in compound adjectives

I have the following taken from a paper that I am editing: … proposed a water-filling factor aided search method to solve … My question is related to whether I should use an en dash to connect ...
0
votes
1answer
72 views

How do you hyphenate 'branches'?

How do you hyphenate the word 'branches'? I'm intrigued between branch·es and bran·ches.
3
votes
1answer
86 views

Non-preemptive? Non-pre-emptive? Emptive?

We can describe something as pre-emptive, no issue there. If something isn't such, how can we write that? Word gives me red squiggles on 'Non-preemptive', but this looks silly with a double ...
0
votes
2answers
77 views

Use of hyphens in acronyms

PTP-SD is a type of algorithm. PTP stands for "probabilistic tree pruning" SD stands for "sphere decoding" PTP-SD is a type of algorithm that uses PTP with SD. My question is about the use of the ...
1
vote
2answers
78 views

Is the first hyphen in “Anti- and pro-American”, “bi- and tri-monthy”, “country- and state-specific” correct? [duplicate]

Those prefixes "Anti", "bi" etc would look odd as separate words, but then, even complete words like "country" or "state" ending with a dangling hyphen look odd. So what is the correct rule for this? ...
0
votes
1answer
33 views

Is it Game time or game-time? [duplicate]

I'm trying to verify the correctness the following sentence: Game time is Sunday. Is it correct or should it be "Game-time"?
3
votes
1answer
273 views

Correct spelling and/or hyphenation for electronic commerce

What is the correct spelling and/or hyphenation for the abbreviation of electronic commerce? I have seen the following variations. eCommerce E-Commerce ECommerce E-commerce
0
votes
1answer
67 views

When to know if it's valid to hyphenate the words? [duplicate]

I remember when I was in high school, and we were told to write an essay of something. When our mentor was done checking our papers, a friend of mine raised his concern on why did our teacher put a ...
0
votes
0answers
22 views

In the late nineteenth- and early twentieth-centuries; suspended hyphen [duplicate]

How would you suggest to list centuries here: Suspended hyphen: In the late nineteenth- and early twentieth-centuries... Separated by commas: In the late nineteenth-, and early twentieth-, ...
0
votes
1answer
59 views

Hyphenation of the suffix “like”

I am having trouble understanding the following: "the achievable rate of the optimal AF scheme performs close to the cut-set like bound obtained in this paper" I think that the word "like" (above) ...
-1
votes
2answers
111 views

How would you suffix a phrasal verb being used as a noun? [closed]

You may be aware that people often informally suffix a word with '-a-saurus rex' to add emphasis, e.g. 'You Sir, are a douche-a-saurus rex.' I've just been thinking about what the correct orthography ...
4
votes
5answers
515 views

3 meter square area vs 3 square meter area

A. 3 meter square area B. 3 square meter area I’m wondering what the easiest way is to clearly express the difference between A and B above. In A, one side is 3 (meters). In B, one side is ...
4
votes
2answers
163 views

Hyphenating complex physical units

I have been reading about writing conventions for scholarly articles recently - specifically, physics - and have learned that when writing units, write them out if they are not associated with a ...
1
vote
2answers
64 views

Any rule about superheroes and hyphens in their names? [closed]

You really know this fact that Spider-man is hyphenated. But why? Any grammatical rule? Is he unique hero written with a hyphen, unlike Batman, Superman etc.?
5
votes
1answer
384 views

How to hyphenate a negated compound noun?

We have a term for a process, "defect source assessment". We want to describe a set of processes that are not related to that process. Which of the following (if any) would be correct? non ...
0
votes
1answer
42 views

Should “two-week” be hyphenated in “a two-week all-expense-paid trip”? [duplicate]

Which is correct — "a two-week all-expense-paid trip" or "a two week all-expense-paid trip"?
0
votes
1answer
83 views

How to use the term “Inline link”?

I am writing a Terms of Service for a website and I am wondering if both of these examples are correct: "Inline link to an image" "In-line link of an image" Inline linking (also known as ...
2
votes
4answers
790 views

Can “nighttime” be used instead of “night-time”?

I forgot where but I saw the word "night-time" written like "nighttime". Now is that correct or accepted? Can it be written as a single word? I am specifically concerned about British usage. I did ...
1
vote
2answers
33 views

Multiple quantities of an object that has a descriptor and units of measure

My question is probably best illustrated with an example: Four 2.25 hp electric motors were used to propel the vehicle. Is that correct? I feel like it can't be, but my friend is saying ...
2
votes
1answer
95 views

How to capitalize a word with an adverb separated by a hyphen in a title?

How to capitalize a word with an adverb separated by a hyphen in a title? Ex. "Make-up" or "Make-Up" (noun) "Strap-on" or "Strap-On" (noun) "Stripped-down" or "Stripped-Down" (adj.) "Up-to-Date ...
1
vote
1answer
3k views

Do I use timeslot or time slot or time-slot?

As in "the timeslot given to completing the task". Would also be interested to hear if there's different usages for different scenarios.
1
vote
2answers
104 views

Usage of hyphen when naming colors

When is it appropriate to use a hyphen when naming colors? For instance Blue-green has a dash but Teal blue does not. Is there some general English rule that applies?
0
votes
3answers
98 views

Anti followed by phrase, usage of hyphen

See this headline Anti-police brutality march declared illegal, broken up I felt they should have written anti police-brutality or anti-police-brutality. Which one is more proper? Edit: It is ...
0
votes
1answer
31 views

Land cover, land-cover, or landcover?

In literature, I often see landcover, land cover, and even land-cover. Land cover seems slightly more prevalent than the others. Which is correct? Land cover is the material covering the Earth's ...
0
votes
0answers
12 views

Is it possible to use a hyphen in a listing (in a sentence) for abbreviation, even if the compound word consists of two separate words [duplicate]

I'm currently asking myself if it is possible to use "-" for abbreviation in a listing in a sentence to emphasize the togetherness of the previous words and the word in the end, even if they are two ...
0
votes
1answer
61 views

check point, checkpoint or check-point

I am an English Editor for a journal and came across the following sentence in a paper I was editing: ...the increase amount will be doubled at every check point. The context is Cloud-Based ...
1
vote
1answer
164 views

Hyphenation of a phrasal attributive with an open compound: “A B to C noun”

I'm wondering how to properly hyphenate (or en-dash) the following phrase: fiber optic to BNC converter That is to say, a device that converts "fiber optic" to BNC. If it didn't contain an open ...
1
vote
3answers
64 views

What's the best way to write “Ugly Dog brand Dog Food”? [closed]

What's the best way to write this? I'm thinking "Ugly Dog-brand Dog Food" as the most likely candidate... what is grammatically-correct?
4
votes
3answers
151 views

Is a badly-written book a book [which has been] badly written?

This question is prompted by the earlier question Should I use a hyphen after -ly when modifying a verb in the past participle verb? Please don't close this as a dup unless there's a later answer ...
2
votes
2answers
306 views

Should I use a hyphen after -ly when modifying a verb in the past participle verb?

Which of these are acceptable? Is one preferable over the other? "Chemically-deposited tourmaline is never periwinkle." "Chemically deposited tourmaline is never periwinkle." Also, is the title to ...