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26
votes
5answers
23k views

Why is it “your Majesty”, but “my Lord”?

Why is it "your Majesty", but "my Lord"?
22
votes
11answers
7k views

Why doesn't the English language have distinct words to use when talking to elders? [closed]

In many of the languages that I've studied there are separate distinctions in the words to use when talking to elders and when talking to someone of your age or younger. For e.g. in Hindi, if I ...
21
votes
8answers
27k views

Is it proper to omit periods after honorifics (Mr, Mrs, Dr)?

I've been reading the Economist lately and they apparently don't punctuate honorifics like "Mr.", "Mrs.", e.g. The popular rejection of Mr Mubarak offers the Middle East’s best chance for reform ...
20
votes
5answers
41k views

When is it appropriate to use the title “Miss” as opposed to “Ms.”?

There has been some disagreement in my other online searches, and in my own education. Assuming that I do not know if the individual addressed is married, when should I use Miss Brown, and when ...
15
votes
5answers
3k views

What is the best way of conveying respect to elders in English? [duplicate]

In Afrikaans, it is considered very disrespectful to use "you" ( "jy") when referring to someone who is above the level of a peer. Instead, it is expected that you use "u", which is a very respectful ...
14
votes
3answers
1k views

“Mx” the gender-neutral honorific

The gender-neutral honorific “Mx” has its own entry in the OED since August 2015, so no one can argue it doesn't exist. According to The Sunday Times, central and local governments have been quietly ...
9
votes
4answers
6k views

“Mom and Dad” vs “Dad and Mom” [duplicate]

I'm curious if the order implies anything here. I'm pretty sure "Mom and Dad" is standard in English. The issue was hard for me to google, so I'm asking it here: Is using "Dad" before "Mom" incorrect,...
7
votes
6answers
11k views

What do students call their teacher in class? [closed]

Well, years ago I was an English teacher in an English Teaching Institute. In the country I live, students call their teachers by saying "Mr. Teacher" or "Teacher" (literally translated) in schools. ...
7
votes
3answers
114k views

What does “Ms.” stand for? [closed]

In letter writing, there are four different titles to address: Mr. Mrs. Miss. Ms. What does Ms. stand for? Apparently as Mrs. and Miss already stand for female titles, Ms. stood for "...
6
votes
4answers
7k views

How to indicate possession when using abbreviation “Dr.”

I often run into a case where I need to say I have a doctor's appointment, but how would I properly punctuate it if I wanted to use the abbreviation Dr. instead of the word doctor? Dr.'s appointment ...
6
votes
4answers
8k views

“Ma'am” or “Miss” in American English?

Is it common to address a female sales clerk as Miss in the US? What about ma'am? If neither is proper, what would you suggest?
5
votes
3answers
9k views

Salutation for two doctors (not married)

Does use of the salutation Dear Drs. Apple and Banana, imply that Dr. Apple is married to Dr. Banana? That is, would it be better form to use: Dear Dr. Apple and Dr. Banana, when Dr. ...
5
votes
6answers
5k views

Usage of “ladies and gentlemen” to address two people of different sex

It seems to be not quite logical to use the traditional address "ladies and gentlemen" when there are only a single lady and a single gentleman in the room, not counting for the person who is speaking....
4
votes
5answers
2k views

Is there any reason why English doesn’t add respectful words in every sentence? [closed]

My mother tongue, Korean, and its neighbor Japanese have postpositions for expressing honoring the opposite in each sentence when we say to seniors or strangers if these are younger than the speaker. ...
3
votes
3answers
8k views

When is it appropriate to refer to someone as Dr. [Surname]?

I know that the title Dr. is often used to refer to those who practice medicine. For example, today I am going to see Dr. [Surname]. But are we in general expected to use the title when we refer to ...
3
votes
2answers
1k views

When addressing my 'Sensei', should I omit the possessive “my”?

In English, when (if ever) is it appropriate to use the possessive with a formal title when addressing someone? Kind of like I would say, "As you wish, my greatest of loves." For example, Thank ...
3
votes
1answer
181 views

19th C forms of address

In the early 19th C. when the eldest daughter married, did the second oldest daughter become the "Miss Whatever," or did she continue to be identified as "Miss Whoever Whatever?'
3
votes
1answer
880 views

Why are doctors addressed as Mr. in the UK?

In the US most physicians, surgeons and dentists are addressed as "doctor". Very few other professionals receive the same title. In the UK, however, surgeons and dentists seem to prefer to be ...
3
votes
2answers
227 views

Adding Mr/Ms/Mrs to a signature [closed]

Suppose one has an unusual or foreign name, or a name which traditionally belongs to the other gender. Is it inappropriate to add one's title (i.e. Mr/Ms/Mrs) to the signature of a letter/email so as ...
3
votes
4answers
115 views

“two President Roosevelts” or “two Presidents Roosevelt?” Pluralize the honorific or the name?

If you have two people with the same name, affixed with the same honorific, do you pluralize the honorific or the name? For example, There were two President Roosevelts. There were two ...
2
votes
1answer
234 views

Doctor Jekyll (Ph.D.), I presume

I am writing an analysis paper (not related to title), and need to introduce someone with a doctorate in English. Do I write "Doctor [name]" or do I use a suffix?
2
votes
1answer
664 views

Desk name plate for a PhD holder

I have read the full article in wikipedia and this question, but I am still unclear about this, as I am not a native speaker. A quick Google search did not help either. My brother recently received a ...
2
votes
1answer
2k views

What should we call our elder cousin's wife? [closed]

We don’t call our cousins cousin Somebody the way we do with uncles and aunts; we just refer to them by their given name directly. But sometimes we cannot use their name to address them, such as if ...
1
vote
3answers
3k views

Addressing a former office-holder by that office's title [closed]

When is it appropriate to use an "expired" honorific to address or refer to a person? In the U.S., former state governors are occasionally referred to as "Governor So-and-so", although they have not ...
1
vote
5answers
253 views

I want to refer to Bill Gates on his blog with respect in the comments section

One way to address Bill Gates with respect would be to simply write Sir, but I don't want other readers to get confused about who I'm referring to. How do I refer to him with respect without creating ...
1
vote
1answer
127 views

How do you address clergy in a given circumstance and manner? [closed]

I want to ask a question about using titles, but I think it is too broad to be asked here. My question is this: under what circumstance and in what manner should you address Christian clergy? Do you ...
1
vote
1answer
3k views

Capitalization of honorifics such as “your excellency”, “your majesty”, “your holiness”

When addressing an ambassador, is it I agree with your excellency. or should your, excellency, or both be capitalized? Likewise with "your majesty" and "your holiness".
1
vote
1answer
370 views

President of [Country][Name] vs President [Name] of [Country]

I came across the following sentence in The Guardian (emphasis mine): President Vladimir Putin of Russia said the EU was putting pressure on Kiev and organising mass protests against President ...
1
vote
0answers
58 views

Title vs honorific

The Wikipedia article on honorifics states that Some honorifics act as complete replacements for a name, as "Sir" or "Ma'am", or "Your Honor" I had initially thought that titles generally needed ...
0
votes
1answer
6k views

First name or last name with “Sir”

If my teacher's first name is Robert and his last name is Dowry, and I have to send him an email, then which of the following will be correct? Dear Sir Dowry, Dear Sir Robert, Dear Sir ...
0
votes
3answers
11k views

Is it ok to use Er. if a person is engineering degree holder [duplicate]

Its usual that we see doctors use Dr. Title, but I have also seen engineers use title - Er. Is this practise allowed, approved? I have seen few name boards like that in India.
0
votes
2answers
90 views

Is a student studying towards <a degree> “a <a degree> student”?

For example, I assume a "M.Sc. student" would be a person who hasn't yet obtained a Masters degree? I'm almost sure this is what it means, but not 100% sure, so I'd like to have it verified. (I'm ...
0
votes
4answers
796 views

Is there a rule for using or not using the definite article before people’s titles?

The use of the definite article before titles is a confusing area - I always hear “Queen Elizabeth visited” and never “The Queen Elizabeth visited”. But I always hear “The Prince of Wales visited” and ...
0
votes
1answer
649 views

Who verbally uses the title “Miss” with a female's first name (regardless of the female's correct title) and why? [duplicate]

Who verbally uses the title "Miss" with a female's first name (regardless of the female's correct title) and why? Example: Meet with Miss Debbie in the conference room at 2 o'clock.
0
votes
2answers
454 views

“The title of Bachelor of Engineering” vs “the title Bachelor of Engineering”

... obtained the diploma and the title of Bachelor of Engineering (B.Eng.). ... obtained the diploma and the title Bachelor of Engineering (B.Eng). Which sentence is correct? Which is better?
-2
votes
2answers
551 views

Use of word late

If Mr. Peter Smith has died, is it ok to use "Mrs. Peter Smith (late)" for his wife?
-2
votes
1answer
320 views

What is the proper characterization of a US military officer in popular press? [closed]

What is the proper way to represent in popular press the status of a commissioned officer of the United States Marine Corps. who is not retired, has a continuing service commitment, but is no longer ...