Homophones are words that are pronounced the same but have different meanings. They aren't necessarily spelled the same.

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What is the actual word for Leaving Out an Examination?

I am from Nepal, our primary language is not English, so many times there are confusion on words which sound similar and have similar meanings sometimes. Recently, I got into a situation, where I ...
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1answer
192 views

Homonyms/homophones and proper nouns

I introduced my 6-year-old to the concept of "homonyms" (though I've probably got it conflated with homophones or vice-versa). Since then he's been trying to find homonyms. He asked me just now: "Can ...
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Why are *accept* and *except* commonly misspelled as each other? Are they homophones?

Why are accept and except commonly confused for each other when writing? This is unlike most cases, where misspellings come from homophones. In my idiolect at least, accept is /ək.'sɛpt/, and except ...
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622 views

Usage of diffuse vs. defuse

I often hear phrases such as "infantry were sent in to diffuse/defuse the situation," and I am never quite sure which people are saying, and which is correct. Both seem to make sense. To me (a ...
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1answer
136 views

Can anyone come up with two names whose pronunciations are respectively same as “who” and “how”? [closed]

I would like to find out occidental names whose pronunciation are close to my names in my native language. The first name and second name contain preferably only Latin alphabet. In order to state the ...
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218 views

Which word has the same pronuncation as the word “may”?

What is the homophone of the word may? I can't find one real dictionary of homophones, nor is there an answer through Google.
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2answers
460 views

Are homonyms considered single words?

There are many homonyms in the English language, words that are spelled the same and pronounced the same but have different meanings. A few examples: A grizzly bear can bear great weight. I stake ...
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676 views

Is there a term/word for using an incorrect homophone

What would you call the following: Speak now or forever hold your piece.
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786 views

“Nice to talk to” or “Nice to talk too”

One of my friends has corrected someone on their grammar on a social media site. And they think they should say "Nice to talk too". I think it is "Nice to talk to", because "too" is an adverb meaning ...
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Distinguishing /f–t–θ/ in th-fronting and th-stopping dialects

In standard English, the digraph th is a dental fricative [θ, ð]. Several dialects feature th-fronting, where th becomes a labiodental fricative [f, v]; others feature th-stopping, where th becomes a ...
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1answer
1k views

“dispatch” v “despatch” [closed]

Using it in the example of: Can you log despatch and delivery of documents? Three questions: Is despatch a misspelling of dispatch that made its way into the dictionary? Could I use dispatch ...
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4k views

“Night” and “knight” in speech

In English as Germanic language K is ignored at the beginning of word in speech. Night and knight have to be pronounced similar. Then how to differentiate?
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265 views

Has the contraction “you’re” finally been replaced by “your”?

Your is almost universally used these days for you’re (“you are”). Is the misuse of your a result of ignorance, or is the contraction now formally dead?
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Are “flower” and “flour” always homophones?

Flower and flour are said to be homophones. However, considering the number of different pronunciations (/flaʊə/ like BrE sour, /flou(-ə)r/ like AmE sour, /flɑː/ (forvo) like BrE car, etc.) floating ...
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3answers
265 views

Are “rode” and “rowed” pronounced the same?

Is there an English accent which would distinguish these two sentences? He rode from the bridge to the pier. He rowed from the bridge to the pier.
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Do “here” and “hear” have the same phonetic transcription in the same country?

Is there any accent that makes a distinction when pronuncing “here” and “hear”? From Wiktionary: Here (UK) /hɪə(ɹ)/ (US) /hɪɹ/ Hear (UK) /hɪə(ɹ)/ (US) IPA: /hiːɹ/ So, according to that, US ...
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552 views

Is there a name for words following this pattern?

Word pairs like bizarre and bazaar, although spelled differently sound very similar. It also seems like they are more than just a pair of rhyming words. Is there a classification within rhyming ...
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What is the correct pronunciation of the word “route”?

I have always used both "root" as in route 66 and "rooter" as in the networking device. The latter has gotten me funny looks often, however I could not bring myself to accept the inconsistency. Today ...
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Is there a difference in pronunciation between “steal” and “steel”? [closed]

I'm learning English and recently I have found that there is a difference in pronunciation between such words as: hit and heat, sit and seat. I want to know if there is a similar difference in ...
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use of contractions (and some homophones)

Is it true that the current usage and spelling of words like we're/were, there/they're/their, your/you're, etc. is shifting? I heard that in the next generation the apostrophe may be disappearing in ...
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476 views

What is a term for words that are both homophones and homographs?

While there are homophones like bear and bare, and homographs like sow, the pig, and to sow a seed, is there a term for words that cover both categories? The example that comes to mind for me is to ...
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2answers
517 views

Pronunciation: “use” versus “use”

Compare pronunciations: "I want to use the bathroom" (yoos) "I made use of the bathroom." (yus) My poor attempt at creating a phonetically descriptive syntax is supposed to convey that, with the ...
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In a tournament, do I get a “by”, a “bye”, or a “buy”? [closed]

If there are an odd number of competitors at any stage of a single-elimination tournament, one player is excused from play and continues on as if he had defeated his (nonexistent) opponent. This is ...
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3answers
471 views

Why do people so often use “jive” when they actually mean “jibe”?

I often hear people use the word "jive" when I'm pretty sure they mean "jibe." It's a subtle sound difference so it's hard to catch. But why do so many people mix these two up?
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When should I use “your”, and when “you're”? [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: “Your” vs. “you're”: Why the confusion? Instead of saying "you're free to [...]," I've seen many people use "your free to [...]." I've seen ...
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“has gone by” or “has gone bye?”

Is it correct to say, "so much time has gone by", or should "by" be replaced with "bye?" What are some other things someone can say with "by" at the end?
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“Complimentary” vs “complementary”

I got a bit mixed up just now over the difference between "complimentary" and "complementary". My colleagues were arguing over the correct spelling of "complimentary drink" at a nightclub event, and ...
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5answers
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Do people perceive a difference between “phantasy” and “fantasy”?

When I started to learn English, I was used to write phantasy instead of fantasy, and I was always corrected. I recently noticed that phantasy is an English word too. Do people give to those words a ...
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Is it “bear the shame” or “bare the shame”?

Google returns results for both variations of this common phrase. bear the shame bare the shame What is the meaning of this phrase, and which one is correct? Is the speaker carrying their shame ...
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How to remember using “have” instead of “of”?

I'm (reasonably) sure these are wrong: I would of won. I could of done that. and are likely so common because if you phonetically transcribe "would've", "could've", etc, that's what you get. ...
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369 views

Name and list of words with common sounds that share common meanings

There are some words that have similar sounds, though they seem to not share any particular root, and have general connotation. For example, gl-, in gleam, glitter, glisten, has something to do with ...
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Jackson = $$son: pun or topical reference

Alfred Bester's short story The Demolished Man (the original version serialized in Galaxy magazine in 1952, not the novel published in 1963) may have been the first instance of SMS-speak, featuring ...
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“Your” vs. “you're”: Why the confusion?

I have seen many comments on different blogs and forums where English native speakers spelled you're as your. I'm not a native speaker, but I know and understand the difference between the two. Why is ...
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Is it “bear” or “bare” with me?

Is it "bear" or "bare" with me?
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656 views

All together vs. Altogether

Do all together and altogether mean the same and if not, what are the differences?