Questions about the compressed style of English commonly employed in newspaper headlines.

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-1
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0answers
21 views

Common heading for Copy, Move and Clone

I need to list the below items in columns in a table. Add Item Edit Item Delete Item View Item Copy Item Move Item Clone Item Copy, Move and Clone are inter-related and I want to show them in a ...
0
votes
2answers
77 views

Proper use of the verb 'eclipse'

I need help settling a debate regarding the correct usage of the verb eclipse. The headline in question is (slightly paraphrased): Runner Completes 2mi Run; Eclipses 12m Result Now, let's ...
1
vote
1answer
65 views

No inversion in questions in headlines and titles

Why do many titles and headlines read: "Why Europe should become...", NOT "Why should Europe become..."; "How an inventor lost...", NOT "How did an inventor lose..."; "How the photocopier changed...", ...
0
votes
0answers
63 views

“X and me/I having dinner” in captions/headlines/sentence fragments

This is different from some other questions since this is about the usage of "X and me/I" in captions/headlines when it is followed by a gerund (verb+(-ing)) instead of in regular sentences. This ...
1
vote
1answer
152 views

Infinitive in news headlines

I'm a little bit confused with understanding news titles. I recently started to read news in English willing to improve my language skills, but there is one thing that I totally can't understand (and ...
2
votes
3answers
664 views

Is “will open 1st quarter 2015” grammatically correct? [closed]

A lot of signs in the Hong Kong MTR writes: xxx Station will open 1st quarter of 2015 Is this actually grammatically correct?
1
vote
4answers
76 views

Using “ex” on a genitive

I’ve constructed this headline: “Opera Mini to become the default browser on Microsoft’s (ex Nokia’s) feature phones” So, the phones in question used to be produced by Nokia, but Microsoft has ...
0
votes
1answer
128 views

Is this a simple present tense ? If yes then please explain

Statement is as follows: Obama makes a surprise visit to Afghanistan. As per the definition of simple present tense, this statement does not fall into any of the following categories: For ...
0
votes
2answers
74 views

Question about headline “Inmate Dies Anyway”

I came across this headline: "Oklahoma Stops Botched Execution. Inmate Dies Anyway." (link) I was truly disturbed by the use of "anyway". To me, it implies a nonchalant attitude about something that ...
6
votes
5answers
2k views

News article: “Man sentenced for murdering his 10th wife”. What does this mean?

Today I saw this headline for a news article online: Man sentenced for murdering his 10th wife I can't tell if a sentence of this nature means that the man has murdered 10 people (all of which ...
3
votes
3answers
512 views

Is it ok to omit a possessive apostrophe before a capitalized appellation (President, country name, VP, PM)?

In a recent Financial Times article (Yemen PM Escapes Assissnation), the apostrophe necessary to show possession was left out. I've seen colleagues do it as well. Isn't it supposed to be "Yemen's PM ...
3
votes
5answers
1k views

Struggling to understand headlines that use ellipsis

I have trouble understanding headlines because they abuse ellipsis. Two examples: "Mitt Romney, Paul Ryan To Awkwardly Hug, High Five For Next Three Months" "Scores Dead as Fire Sweeps Through ...
2
votes
2answers
1k views

Is there a specific term for when you combine two unrelated terms in a headline in order to grab attention? [closed]

Is there a specific term for when you combine two unrelated terms in a headline in order to grab attention? For example: Bolivian Kick Boxer Meets US Marine Or: Kickboxer Meets a Marine (1) ...
2
votes
1answer
2k views

Capital letters in headlines [closed]

I’m not a native English speaker. I’ve noticed that in titles or headlines, many words often start with a capital letter while others are still lowercase. As an example, the title of my question ...
3
votes
3answers
1k views

Is “five-yearly” an acceptable usage of an adverb of manner in British English?

Today's BBC News web page has this headline: New era of five-yearly doctor checks starts There's a word that means "five-yearly": quinquennial. It's probably too long for headline writers and ...
6
votes
1answer
570 views

What does “To” mean in a newspaper headline?

What does to mean in a newspaper headline, for example: Airline XY to cut cost of pilots' wages Is it a shorter form of "Is going to" or "Is planning to"?
24
votes
4answers
5k views

Why do newspaper headlines use strange syntax rules?

Newspaper/news article headlines usually have different syntax rules, for example No copula. North Korea trip 'successful' Past events written in present. Qantas cancels flight out of frozen ...