Grammaticality refers to whether something obeys the rules of grammar for English.

learn more… | top users | synonyms (2)

2
votes
2answers
93 views

Using “so that” instead of “ensure”

I am reviewing a set of guidelines which make frequent use of to ensure, like: The soup should be taken off the gas after cooking, to ensure that it does not burn. I want the text to be less ...
1
vote
2answers
94 views

No one + plural verb

The sentence is: No one forget about the issue, please. From what I've read on the internet, 'no one' always takes a singular verb, but somehow 'no one forgets' doesn't sound right to me. But I ...
0
votes
2answers
126 views

Is this sentence comprehensible?

Heyho! I've been discussing the following sentence with my girlfriend for days. For me (the author :)) it is understandable. She thinks that the point is hard to get and the sentence could be better ...
0
votes
2answers
168 views

What’s the difference between “for” and “to” in “for/to many people”?

Given these two versions of a sentence: For many people, dogs are the best friends. To many people, dogs are the best friends. I have following questions: What is the difference between ...
0
votes
2answers
63 views

Is there any difference between saying “for long” or just “long”?

For example: Is "Good sensation of freshness long after brushing" any different from "Good sensation of freshness for long after brushing?"
-1
votes
2answers
83 views

Grammatically incorrect or just awkward?

Is this grammatically incorrect or just clunky? If you put time into it you will be rewarded as you master all the different techniques. EDIT (copied from a reply below): I’ll add a bit of ...
-1
votes
2answers
178 views

“The title of Bachelor of Engineering” vs “the title Bachelor of Engineering”

... obtained the diploma and the title of Bachelor of Engineering (B.Eng.). ... obtained the diploma and the title Bachelor of Engineering (B.Eng). Which sentence is correct? Which is ...
2
votes
1answer
106 views

Have a great sleep?

Saying "I had a good night's sleep" is considered correct English. But, is saying "I had a good/great sleep" considered correct? As a follow up: Is it also okay to wish someone, "Have a great sleep"? ...
2
votes
1answer
46 views

Can you say “rancoring”?

I know it's an adjective, but I googled it, and found it in an article about John McEnroe, specifically, "a rancoring go-to-hell beast". I was wondering if it is okay to use the word as if it were a ...
1
vote
1answer
127 views

“The internet is full of clothes. But only some are perfect for your shape.”

I have a slight problem with a video we're working on. I'm wondering if "some are" is correct grammatically in the following sentence. The internet is full of clothes. But only some are perfect ...
1
vote
1answer
58 views

comparative clause

The following three sentences appear in the same published paper. Why does No. 1 employ the auxiliary "did" whereas the other two omit it? This could explain why ProRoot WMTA showed significantly ...
1
vote
1answer
102 views

Why areN'T 'not least' and 'notably' interchangeable?

The example is taken from page 1 of this PDF ; The National Admissions Test for Law (LNAT): You may find, however, that answering one question helps you answer the next, not least for the purposes ...
1
vote
1answer
280 views

“There is” vs “there are”?

I wrote an essay and returned it to my teacher who told me that it was perfect except for that one mistake with the usage of there are: There are currently 192 218 546 ways to set up..." She ...
0
votes
1answer
20 views

'For while …, yet …' : Right quantity and use of conjunctions?

For while the capacity to overcome all opposing sensible impulses can and must be simply presupposed in man on account of his freedom, yet this capacity as strength is something he must acquire. ...
0
votes
1answer
49 views

use of avail in the following sentence

The employees are expected to plan their expenditure and avail loans prudently and responsibly. Is this sentence correct? Is it necessary to use of after avail in this sentence? Please give the ...
0
votes
1answer
93 views

Non-standard sentence construction with “there is no”

I have just come across this very unusual construction, in my view at least. Is it correct and if yes, what grammar rules apply here? I would really appreciate it if anyone could help me with this and ...
0
votes
1answer
67 views

a few days every month usage

"A few days every month, he goes cycling." Is the noun phrase "a few days every month" acting as an adverb to "goes" in the above sentence? There is no preposition before the noun phrase "a few ...
0
votes
1answer
70 views

“So shouldn't you”?

So shouldn't you: is this grammatically correct? Or is you shouldn't either the only appropriate response?
0
votes
1answer
60 views

“You've been living here [for] too long”

Is it correct to say "You've been living here for too long"? Or is it better to drop the for? "You've been living here too long." Is either preferrable over the other for some reason?
0
votes
1answer
983 views

Is answering “Hope you had a good time! I” with “I did!” correct?

If someone says to me, "Hope you had a good time!" could I then answer "I did!" and it be grammatical? My first language is French, and I’m wondering if responding that way works in English.
0
votes
1answer
84 views

“with” vs “to have”

I have a tendency to say things like: It was nice with cake. Usually it's in the form of: It was adjective with noun. whereas my wife is always correcting me to: It was nice to have ...
0
votes
1answer
241 views

Can 'must' be used in a negative question?

Is it proper to write negative questions this way? You mustn't watch too much TV, must you?
0
votes
1answer
83 views

Something happens because clause A, and clause B.

I wonder whether because can introduce two or even more reasons; if yes, how they are connected. For example, John came late because he woke up late, and his bicycle was broken. Is the sentence ...
-1
votes
1answer
35 views

What would you do if I told you+subordinate clause

there are a couple of sentences that I have been having trouble with lately. I'll start with an example: I'd be lying if I said I have never considered moving.(referring to the present) That's how ...
-1
votes
1answer
100 views

We like to wish you .. VS We would like to wish you…

I'm having some difficulty with this sentence. Can one say: ''We like''...(to wish, to ask, to join etc) In my opinion one can never say ''we like to'' but must always say ''We WOULD like to'' or ...
-1
votes
1answer
338 views

Is the usage “one of the better” correct and grammatical?

A colleague of mine stated that he often hears "one of the better X" from native speakers. I haven't heard this phrase often, and I would use "one of the best X" myself, unless I want to contrast ...
-1
votes
1answer
99 views

Is “physically based rendering” grammatically correct?

Physically based rendering is a relatively new but established term in computer graphics that refers to rendering that tries to closely mimic the laws of physics for more photorealistic results. The ...
-1
votes
1answer
640 views

Got started or started

I am a learner of the English language. I have written two sentences, please give your two minutes and let me know, which one is correct? In the below sentences an action was started by my dog, for an ...
-1
votes
1answer
2k views

“They had already decided what to do” vs. “they had decided what to do already”

I was surprised that they had already decided what to do. I was surprised that they had decided what to do already. Which sentence is correct?
-1
votes
1answer
279 views

mixed functional and non-functional requirement

Some background. Functional requirement of a web service is concerned with the correctness of the web service's function — say, the service will always return a number that is less than two. The ...
-1
votes
1answer
709 views

Is the answer to this question “neither” or “either”?

She doesn't think so or you don't think so? Is it grammatically correct to respond with Either. or Neither. to this question? Or does this depend on the meaning intended to be ...
-1
votes
1answer
145 views

Which is the preposition to go with “best”? Is it “best at”?

Is it right to say: We take pride in doing what we are best at, delivering unsurpassed levels of service, so our customers can do what they are best at.
-1
votes
1answer
99 views

The future as reported in the past

Is (1) correct, or must it be written as (2)? John told me yesterday that this contract will not be renewed when it ends next month. John told me yesterday that this contract would not be ...
-2
votes
1answer
36 views

“According to our discussion, is that correct I DO this part?” is this sentence correct?

The whole sentence is here: Since this coming Sunday is the first day of March, our children need new TWA schedules, according to our discussion, is that correct I DO this part? Can I write this ...
-7
votes
1answer
104 views

should i put the in this sentence

I have this sentence:- Your environment advances the well being of humanity and the society. Should I put the before society, or should I remove it and put it before humanity?
1
vote
0answers
345 views

Subject/Complement Agreement. How to describe problem with “The thing is the objects.”

In my ell answer, version 32, I provided the following, problematic, wording (especially bold italic), and I need help to better understand this issue so I can fix my answer:1 The thing is ...
0
votes
0answers
56 views

Is using a sentence as a subject grammatically correct?

For example: Attack them directly won't do anything "Attack them directly" is a partial sentence. In this sentence, we treat that whole phrase as a subject and make a sentence from the phrase. ...
0
votes
0answers
38 views

Would it be 'meet' or 'have met' in this structure?

If I bumped into someone, who happened to be called John, yesterday, and I am telling someone else of the encounter, would I say: I happened to meet John yesterday. or I happened to have ...
0
votes
0answers
40 views

Is there a reason for omitting “it” in: “As is usually seen”?

As is usually seen in such mass tragedies Why can't I say "As it is usually seen"
0
votes
0answers
36 views

A question on the use of 'since'.

'Since' means throughout the period from a specified point in past time to the present. Can I use it to mean 'throughout the period from a specified point in past time to a specific point also in the ...
0
votes
0answers
25 views

“Question”/“issue” followed by “of”

"This raises the question [of] when the event happened." "This raises the issue [of] whether the Government would approve." Is the inclusion of "of" in these and similar sentences (a) necessary, (b) ...
0
votes
0answers
53 views

apart from + verb with gerund or not

I was reading the Rails Tutorial and I came across this: The div tag is a generic division; it doesn’t do anything apart from divide the document into distinct parts. I would say apart from ...
0
votes
0answers
65 views

Is it correct to say “X is a Y, doing Z”?

Not sure how to best put this in words, but I'll give an example below. This is from a boilerplate text of a company: ABC is a manufacturing company, partnering with DEF to... I would be ...
0
votes
0answers
243 views

Is the term, gone from blank to blank, academically acceptable?

Is the term, gone from (blank) to (blank), academically acceptable? If not what alternatives are there to state the same thing in a more precise manner?
0
votes
0answers
50 views

Sentence with incorrect/ambiguous subject?

This is from Alex Harris’s article on Angel Di Maria on express.co.uk. What does the sentence in bold mean? It is grammatical? Can you explain it? “When you ask me how I will return to Argentine ...
0
votes
0answers
46 views

Better phrasing for “the sum of cost of all the rows”

I have added up the cost in several rows and I want to write "The sum of cost of all the rows", but that sounds off. I have a feeling it's wrong. Any suggestions? Likewise, if money were replaced ...
-1
votes
0answers
53 views

I'll be curious

Just wondering if it is correct to say "I'll be curious to". For example, I used the sentence "I'll be curious to read them [the text messages] later". Do I actually mean to say "I am curious to read ...