Grammaticality refers to whether something obeys the rules of grammar for English.

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Having vs To Have

So I came across a grammar question that I really had no idea how to answer. The question was to pick the best answer for the blank. The question was A: Did you see Mandy's presentation this morning? ...
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1answer
25 views

Is 'Apart from by…' grammatically correct

While writing a news report, I found myself phrasing a sentence like this: "Apart from by the managing director, the report would be reviewed by three specially constituted teams." Though I ...
8
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4answers
196 views

Omitting “there” in a sentence

Can I omit there in the following question: How much juice is there in the bottle? When is it possible to omit there in a sentence? Any references to grammar sources are welcome and expected. ...
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1answer
124 views

What’s so funny about “You are winner”? [closed]

I came across one slang thing: http://www.urbandictionary.com/define.php?term=You%27re%20Winner! While understand that it is grammatically incorrect and you must say "You are the winner", I don't get ...
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51 views

The bottom graph shows the acceleration profiles, while the top the corresponding speed changes

Are the verb and noun omissions in the following sentence correct? (The words enclosed in parentheses are the omitted ones.) The bottom graph shows the acceleration profiles, while the top (graph) ...
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6answers
805 views

Why is “herself” required in this particular sentence?

Why is a reflexive pronoun, i.e. herself, grammatically required in the following sentence? I gave Susie a picture of herself. Compare with: I gave Susie a picture of her. This ...
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4answers
7k views

Which is correct: “There are not any employees” vs. “there is not any employee”

Sometimes I see two variants of following sentence: "there are not any employees" in the department "there is not any employee" in the department What is the correct sentence?
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3answers
40 views

Is it ok to write “Good to see you” in an email or facebook message?

An old friend of mine wrote some greetings to me on facebook. Now if I want to answer his greetings, is it ok to write: "Hi, Jhon, good to see you again"? Because I don't "see" him by e-mail or when ...
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34 views

Something happens because clause A, and clause B.

I wonder whether because can introduce two or even more reasons; if yes, how they are connected. For example, John came late because he woke up late, and his bicycle was broken. Is the sentence ...
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20 views

In the sentence structure “where + clause”, can the clause include multiple sub-clauses? [on hold]

Is the clause after "where" as is shown below correct? Their relationship is given as: A + B = C (1) where A belongs to something, B is something, and C denotes ...
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3answers
3k views

Is the usage of “in your humble opinion” correct?

We use "in my humble opinion" to express humility. But I even see usage of "in your humble opinion" to ask for others' opinions. What does it mean? I see the usage in the original message here, ...
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3answers
92 views

“He walks as if he is drunk.” Grammatically correct ? Any difference in meaning from “…as if he were drunk.”?

Is it grammatically correct to use an indicative verb after "as if", or "as though" for that matter? I've heard someone say: "He walks as if he is drunk." Would there have been any difference ...
2
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1answer
46 views

Much and not much

Why is it that much doesn't fit in many of the places not much does? Compare "Have you got any food in the house?" "Not much." "Would you like this old box?" "That's not much use to me." with ...
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1answer
79 views

Is “no other” + comparative grammatically correct?

There is no other harsher critic than yourself. I'm really stumped on this one. The more I read it the less correct it sounds. I think the word harsher is making the sentence sound fairly off ...
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6answers
17k views

Is “solutioning” a correct word?

My Outlook flags the word "solutioning" as a spelling mistake. According to Urban Dictionary : solutioning: A word many business people misuse to describe the process of creating a solution. ...
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1answer
43 views

Why can't “had better” take a that-clause?

Given that we say things such as "I'd rather (that) you do it.", I'd expect "I had better (that) you do it." to be possible as well to mean "I would consider/find/have it better that you do it.", ...
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1answer
107 views

Article “the” with relative clauses [duplicate]

I am not confident about my judgement as to whether or not "the" is required if a relative clause is used in a sentence. For example, The data can be collected on all the computers on which the ...
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35 views

“It follows that” + an equation or “It follows” + an equation? [on hold]

Which of the following sentences is correct? (a) It follows: a=b. (1) or (b) It follows a=b. (1) or (c) It follows that: ...
2
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40 views

Should the verb phrases following “either” and “or” in an “either/or” sentence have the same structure?

Should the verb phrases following either and or in an "either or" sentence have the same structure? For example, is the following sentence correct? The coordinates of the points are either ...
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5answers
150 views

“Sally broke her leg” or “Sally has broken her leg”? How does switching the past simple with the present perfect affect meaning?

Earlier today I had a private lesson with an Italian student—intermediate level, who has been studying the present perfect vs. past simple tense. His teacher had given him an exercise where a list of ...
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1answer
27 views

difference between “confer” upon & “confers” upon

In an example like: Aristotle University upon recommendation from College of Nursing and by authority of the Board of Governors of Aristotle University hereby "confer" upon Mr. John Williams the ...
2
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1answer
42 views

“Whom” or “who” for object of a subordinate clause inside a relative clause [duplicate]

They interviewed several candidates who he thought had the experience and qualifications he required. My test prep book says this should be "who" because of the subordinate clause's predicate: ...
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6answers
2k views

Will grammar errors become correct after enough people use them for enough time?

First let me state the obvious—based on my own experience—that hordes of people are confused about certain basic grammar principles. For example, I so often see mistakes in choosing the pronoun to use ...
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1answer
59 views

What is the origin of using '-wise' as a suffix? [duplicate]

What is the origin of using '-wise' as a suffix in expressions such as the following. Is it grammatically correct? Is it strongly idiomatic, or sloppy language? 'What is he doing job-wise these ...
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1answer
7k views

“Upload to” vs. “upload on”

Which preposition should follow the verb to upload — to, on, or something else?
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1answer
46 views

Whats the past of present unreal conditonal?

What is the past of present unreal conditional ? I wish I were king ( how to make it past, is it - I wished I had been king ) What's the difference between the following two - "I wish it stopped ...
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2answers
62 views

Is it possible to say so very and very so?

I know that it is correct to use: Thank you so very much. As much as I know an adverb can be theoretically used to modify another adverb, so my question is: Is it possible to say very so ...
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2answers
148 views

Do the -ing and to-infinitive “verbs” that follow catenative verbs always take the grammatical function of “noun”?

I'm wondering whether or not the verb form that follows a catenative verb has the grammatical function of a noun or of a verb, and whether or not it depends on the first catenative verb. "I like to ...
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1answer
211 views

“All the good people” vs. “all of the good people”

I've heard both of these before. All the good people All of the good people Are they both correct?
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1answer
1k views

Is it correct to use “all this” instead of “all of this”?

I frequently see people write "all this", instead of "all of this". Is this a grammatically correct phrase? My intuition tells me that it's wrong (the spoken phrase "all this" is really a contraction ...
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0answers
24 views

Singular plural clarification with none objects [duplicate]

Should I use "no entries are found" or "no entry is found" or "no entries is found"? Which is more correct and which is wrong in usage?
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15 views

Grammar used in have been and had been in sentence [duplicate]

When we are going to use have been and had been ? Especially in Past tense and Past participle ?
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1answer
70 views

Why “hundreds of <noun>s” instead of “hundreds of <noun>”?

In the expression hundreds of <noun>(s), I would think that hundreds is what's being modified because of is usually right-branching: hundreds<-{of <noun>(s)} (This is in contrast ...
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3answers
70 views

How to indicate “now” in storytelling?

The following sentences - I was humiliated by him, and now he was standing next to me. and And now, I was looking at him, preparing for his entrance. Are these grammatically correct? I ...
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14k views

Which is correct: “bored of”, “bored by”, “bored with”?

I have been asked by a young friend, "Which is correct: bored by, bored of, or bored with?" My instinct is to say that "bored of" and "bored by" are fine, but "bored with" sounds like she is being ...
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1answer
49 views

Can one use 'prepare' instead of 'be prepared' or 'be ready'?

a) - The document you requested will take four days to be ready. b) - The document you requested will take four days to prepare. Does (b) give the same meaning as (a)? Is this a correct way to use ...
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The placement of you

It was great working with you and Jan. Or It was great working with Jan and you.
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Was I driving more than 5 mph under the speed limit, or less than 5 mph under the speed limit?

Suppose I am driving 38 miles per hour in a 45 zone. This, of course, is seven miles per hour under the speed limit. Of course, I am driving this slowly because the road is wet, and safe driving ...
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2answers
41 views

How to best correct ambiguity of “in the room next to me”?

A common construction in English is: There is a person in the room next to me. However, this is ambiguous because it’s unclear whether the person is in a separate room that happens to be ...
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50 views

Is the usage of “in” in the following sentence correct? [closed]

Is the usage of in in the following sentence correct? She sacrificed her own life in to teach my father a lesson and hoped to keep us alive. I am reading a book that one of my friends wrote; ...
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1answer
27 views

“Write an update to people”?

In the context of the proper use of a ticket-tracking system for software development, someone said: Do not write project status updates to a limited subset of people in email. (Instead, send ...
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2answers
65 views

Using two “And”s [duplicate]

Is the following (part of the) sentence correct grammatically? ... I will describe how my personal experiences and my professional and academic background have prepared me to ...
9
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5answers
15k views

Can you use two “and”s in a sentence?

For example, I like chocolate, vanilla, and lemon and orange ice cream. Indicating "lemon and orange" is a combined flavor, as an item in the list needing an initial and.
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1answer
39 views

“Not only . . . but (also)” correlative conjunction question

The amount of jobs that have been transferred out of state in the past five years is staggering; not only manufacturing jobs but white-collar ones have moved as well. Is this appropriate usage of ...
3
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4answers
105 views

Is there an implied verb missing?

Is this statement correct? - However catastrophic the physical abuse, the lasting scars came from the verbal insults that had been hurled at them. Does the first part of the sentence before the ...
6
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7answers
3k views

Why do we say “to be a laughing stock”?

I've come through the expression "to be a laughing stock" to talk about a person who has done something stupid and who people laugh at because of that, and I've started to wonder about it. First of ...
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3answers
3k views

Is a comma needed here?

If I were to try and describe a book called "Book", is this sentence grammatically correct? The book Book by Joe Bob is set in... I was told that this sentence is incorrect, that commas must ...
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55k views

Punctuation for the phrase “including but not limited to”

This is my first question on this stack exchange. I'm hoping this kind of question is welcome here, and excuse my ignorance, but my confusion evident below is exactly why I am a Software Engineer ...
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1answer
6k views

Which is correct: “has died” or “died”?

To me, using Present Perfect form means the event can occur again. So, saying someone has died may not be grammatically correct. Also, I noticed (it might be just coincidence): passed away ...
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1answer
92 views

When to use “myself” or “me” [duplicate]

Which is grammatically correct? "Request you to register me for the course" "Request you to register myself for the course"