Grammaticality refers to whether something obeys the rules of grammar for English.

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42
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9answers
24k views

What is wrong with the word “performant”?

I keep getting the red underlining in Word whenever I write the word "performant". Here I intend to refer to something that performs well or better than something else (i.e., it's more performant). ...
0
votes
1answer
54 views

Is “Even I too.” a valid sentence?

Consider the following conversations: A: "I must leave now because I have to be home in 30 minutes." B: "Even I too." A: "I am getting bored." B: "Even I too." Is the response valid? I ...
0
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4answers
62 views

Order of words and punctuation in a sentence [on hold]

I am writing a sentence whose word order and punctuation has put me in a fix. Can I get some opinions on whether the construction is correct, grammatically? Ask him what becomes of the dogs he ...
0
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1answer
581 views

Can I end this sentence with “also” or “too”? Which one is right?

Please see the sentences: I scheduled to stay after school with you today, but yesterday I was assigned a detention for today too. I scheduled to stay after school with you today, but ...
-1
votes
1answer
31 views

Functionality vs. Functionalities: are both correct pluralizations?

To me, inasmuch as use of the word functionality referring to software means the extent of its overall ability, I would write "The software implements the following functionality." However, I've seen ...
0
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0answers
13 views

sentences that show correct pronoun agreement [on hold]

Neither Claire nor Elise had her application completed in time to be considered by the university. is it correct
2
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3answers
8k views

“Neither” and “either” usage in negative sentence

I would like to make sure I understood the usage of these: Do you want A or B? I do not want either. [none of them] I want neither. [Can I say that?]
2
votes
2answers
5k views

Is the usage “can able to” wrong? I believe it's wrong. But where can I find some reference on the same?

I hear a lot of people use 'can able to' in their daily talk. I believe it's entirely wrong. Both 'can' and 'able to' hold the same meaning. Where do I get more information on the same and also the ...
5
votes
2answers
5k views

Can one answer “Have you got…?” with “Yes, I've got.”?

As an American in Europe I often get questions about the British "have got" which is hard for me to answer since I have little feeling for what is correct. E.g. someone today asked me: If someone ...
10
votes
4answers
9k views

“Haven't you?” or “don't you?”

What is the right question tag (in British English) when we use the verb have? I have interviewed a few native speakers and none of them could explain why sometimes they prefer "haven't/hasn't" and ...
1
vote
2answers
79 views

Is this usage of 'of which' correct?

I'm working on an employee manual and I came across this one: "Our team philosophy is to become the best of which we are capable." Is this a correct sentence? The point it's trying to get across is ...
0
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0answers
47 views

What's the difference between “is done” vs “has been done” and “is to be done” vs “should be done”? [on hold]

Please tell me the differences between the sentences below, and which sentence you think is the most idiomatic in English: What is to be done is done; there is no more to be done What is to ...
0
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0answers
29 views

wedding invite template [on hold]

I sent the below wedding invite to few of my friends for proof reading Born unknown to each other, we are stepping into a new beginning of wedded life, with new dreams, new hopes, new aspirations ...
22
votes
5answers
15k views

Is “might could” a correct construct?

I have a friend from the southern U.S. who uses the phrase “might could” quite often. He’ll say, for example: I might could do that this weekend. When I first heard him say this, it made me do ...
2
votes
2answers
87 views

Is this a correct English sentence: “I'm not quite well enough ready yet.”

I was talking to someone recently and blurted out as I had to move on to another task "I am not quite well enough ready yet" which sparked a discussion about if that was correct English. Although I'll ...
2
votes
2answers
3k views

“For how long have you been…” vs. “how long have you been…”

Ante-scriptum: The question should be quite a frequently arising one, so this might be a duplicate. If it is, I haven't found it previously asked here I don't know if the title is meaningful, but ...
3
votes
3answers
1k views

How to understand “It takes a little bit of getting used to the idea…”?

The following sentence is from a mathematical lecture note here: It takes a little bit of getting used to the idea of a function that cannot actually be evaluated at any specific point, but with ...
-4
votes
2answers
46 views

I want the exact answer and difference between these two? [closed]

have you spoke to her (or) have you speak to her? Which is correct?
-5
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0answers
45 views

i have only one sibling that is my elder brother [closed]

i have only one sibling that is my elder brother.
5
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3answers
21k views

Is “Thanks a ton” a commonly used phrase?

Is it correct to say so? Does this mean the same as "thanks a lot"?
-1
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1answer
138 views

I'm not sure what is wrong in my sentence [closed]

I've been writing a technical document and I wrote the following sentence. "The rest of sections focus on realizing each use case." MSWord shows this sentence is wrong. I'm not sure what is wrong in ...
2
votes
2answers
139 views

In what dialects is “I don't like it too” grammatical?

Consider: Too — (adv.) also, as well, in addition. We don’t usually use too in negative clauses; we use either instead: I don’t like that kind of stuff. I don’t like it either. That said, ...
9
votes
4answers
858 views

“Would have” in conditional clauses

I have been taught to use the if I had form in conditional clauses referring to the past: If the president had asked me, I would have told him the same thing. As far as I can tell though, the ...
-2
votes
1answer
64 views

“Permanent resident in/of America” [closed]

When conveying this on foreign soil, which of these is correct usage: Permanent Resident of America Permanent Resident in America
3
votes
2answers
178 views

Do the -ing and to-infinitive “verbs” that follow catenative verbs always take the grammatical function of “noun”?

I'm wondering whether or not the verb form that follows a catenative verb has the grammatical function of a noun or of a verb, and whether or not it depends on the first catenative verb. "I like to ...
0
votes
2answers
66 views

Different between 'effect' and 'impact'

Someone asks me this question: 'How much work is it to fix issue? then I'm trying to determine potential impact.' My answer is that 'very little work should to be done to fix this issue. And there is ...
3
votes
1answer
48 views

Unless in third conditional sentences

"Jane wouldn't have found a job unless she had gone to London" is a natural-sounding sentence and has two different meanings, depending on whether Jane really did move to London or not: (1) "Jane ...
-2
votes
0answers
33 views

correct these sentences [closed]

Please correct these sentences. 1).i do not know where was he at that time. 2)he is good in Urdu. 3)the peoples of pakistan are very nice 4) he agrees of me 5)the young man is addicted to smoke 6) i ...
5
votes
3answers
116 views

Verb agreement in “Where is the Messiah and his Kingdom?”

Where is the Messiah and his Kingdom? I think it should be "Where are the Messiah and his kingdom"; it just sounds better! But my friends and even a teacher claim that "is" would be correct.
1
vote
0answers
16 views

When can a singular verb be used for multiple distinct subjects? [duplicate]

I've read "Are" vs. "is" with compound subjects and http://www.grammar.cl/Present/ThereIsThereAre.htm, so this doesn't duplicate, because here, the subjects are disparate. "The ...
0
votes
1answer
62 views

Can one use 'prepare' instead of 'be prepared' or 'be ready'?

a) - The document you requested will take four days to be ready. b) - The document you requested will take four days to prepare. Does (b) give the same meaning as (a)? Is this a correct way to use ...
3
votes
1answer
65 views

Is it grammatical to use “same” or “the same” in substitution for an objective pronoun?

I've seen and heard this usage of the pronoun "same" more than once, and it sounded strange to my ears: "Thank you for the book; I will return same shortly." "Wine production has increased, ...
0
votes
2answers
149 views

Why use 'about them' in this sentence?

Why use 'about them' in this sentence? I appreciate every kind of person, most notably those who have a good sense of humour, a positive outlook on life as well as a good energy about them. ...
0
votes
1answer
36 views

“Write an update to people”?

In the context of the proper use of a ticket-tracking system for software development, someone said: Do not write project status updates to a limited subset of people in email. (Instead, send ...
21
votes
3answers
7k views

When is a gerund supposed to be preceded by a possessive pronoun?

I assume that the following sentences are grammatically correct: He resents your being more popular than he is. Most of the members paid their dues without my asking them. They objected ...
0
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1answer
62 views

Can 'must' be used in a negative question?

Is it proper to write negative questions this way? You mustn't watch too much TV, must you?
0
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2answers
164 views

Can 'post' and 'after' used interchangeably?

I notice few colleagues use 'post' almost everywhere. Today one of them said 'lets meet up post noon' and I thought shouldn't it be 'afternoon'? I could be okay with 'post lunch' but somehow 'post ...
1
vote
2answers
35 views

correct way of cooking

What is correct Sometimes I cook for myself or Sometimes I cook myself. This sounds like cooking self, which is not true. I've heard ( most of times ) people use second phrase. Which of the two ...
11
votes
6answers
7k views

“For both our sake” or “for both our sakes”

Should sake be pluralized in this usage? For both our sake, I'm going to leave now. For both our sakes, I'm going to leave now.
3
votes
7answers
6k views

“Due to” at the beginning of a sentence

I tried to say this: Due to it will have less features than the actual standard system, the performance will be better. Basically, I used a sentence after due to, and one of my English friends ...
3
votes
1answer
112 views

Can a sentence end in “left”

Which is the correct phrase: You have 5 days left of your trial. or: You have 5 days of your trial left.
0
votes
1answer
21 views

Is the use of “Elysial” acceptable / correct? [closed]

Based on the following definition: elysian adj (Classical Myth & Legend) of or relating to Elysium delightful; glorious; blissful Collins English Dictionary – Complete ...
0
votes
2answers
59 views

Do I need to use a comma before “everyone” to set off the vocative? [duplicate]

While I was writing a status update today on social media I decided to do some grammar-learning. The status update was "Happy Labor Day everyone!" and I am now wondering if I should place a comma ...
1
vote
2answers
116 views

I will drive into town… but I can't drive

My girlfriend messaged me earlier to say "I will drive into town with my mother". I thought this was odd, since she doesn't have a licence. Turns out she meant that her mother will be driving, and she ...
6
votes
5answers
3k views

Which one is more correct: “works at a university” or “works in a university”?

My relative is a fairly big academic and works at a university. Is this correct? or should I have used in instead?
1
vote
0answers
29 views

'Make' vs. 'makes' in “this makes” and “this does make”? [duplicate]

In English grammar, to my understanding, it is incorrect to say "this does makes," but I'm not sure why (and nor does my mother, who is an editor). It is acceptable to say "this makes [sense]," and ...
1
vote
0answers
28 views

Can just a noun phrase be a complete list item? [closed]

In the following extract: [A number of issues had to be considered.] Firstly, the scope of her responsibilities. ... “the scope of her responsibilities” is just a noun phrase used as a ...
7
votes
4answers
233 views

“Sally broke her leg” vs. “Sally has broken her leg”? How does switching the past simple with the present perfect affect meaning?

Earlier today I had a private lesson with an Italian student—intermediate level, who has been studying the present perfect vs. past simple tense. His teacher had given him an exercise where a list of ...
1
vote
1answer
82 views

How do I use “as of now” correctly?

Just to clarify, I am not a native English speaker. I occasionally hear from other non-native English speakers the use of the phrase: "As of now" with the meaning of Currently. Initially I did not ...
1
vote
1answer
57 views

Is there any difference between “like” and “as”?

Why is it not right to say: He speaks like his father does. But it’s quite correct to say: He speaks like his father. He speaks as his father does.