Grammaticality refers to whether something obeys the rules of grammar for English.

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Is it always necessary to be “finished with”?

Is it grammatically incorrect to say "done school" or "finished school"? For example, I am done school, or I am finished school. Must I always use the word with to be grammatically ...
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7answers
9k views

Can “cattle” be singular?

I've grown up on a farm, and my dad and his dad, apparently, always used "cattle" to refer to both the singular and plural forms of the domestic bovine. I've always assumed it's how the word "deer" ...
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2answers
7k views

“I haven't got” vs. “I don't have”

Which is the correct way of saying this in English? I haven't got any money. I don't have any money. If both are correct, which is the difference between them?
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3answers
205 views

Is “Are” always used with plural verbs/nouns? [duplicate]

Examples: There's six seasons, dude. Wouldn't it be: There're six seasons, dude. We are talking about multiple items; six seasons. If we refer to multiple items, we should use "Are" in ...
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3answers
5k views

Is “who all is” grammatically correct?

I often tend to say something like Who all is coming to the movies? And my friends correct me that I should be saying Who all are coming to the movies? So which one is correct?
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8answers
157k views

Which is correct, “you and I” or “you and me”?

When the phrase is used as an object, why so many native speakers are saying "you and I" instead of "you and me"? I'm not a native speaker but I thought "you and me" is correct. Not sure if this falls ...
18
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5answers
2k views

Is “a whole nother” grammatical?

Often one will hear the phrase that's a whole nother kettle of fish, but is "nother" actually grammatical? If not, what would the correct way of saying it be?
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2answers
14k views

“Studying PhD at the university” or “studying PhD in the university”?

Which of these two sentences is correct: I am studying PhD at the university. I am studying PhD in the university. Should I use "at" or "in"? Or is there no difference?
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1answer
11k views

Plural of table leaf

In the context of a table leaf, what is the correct plural term, "table leafs" or "table leaves"?
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1answer
55 views

Can you start a sentence with “Hopefully,…”?

I am studying for the SAT, and I learned just now that the following sentence is grammatically incorrect: Hopefully, we will be able to complete the building before the rainy season sets in. ...
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11answers
7k views

Can a sentence start with “Because”?

In my grade school days, I recall a teacher proclaiming to the class: You should never start a sentence with the word "Because". Of course, I've since seen lots of examples to the contrary, and ...
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2answers
52 views

What does “in forming a human being” mean?

I just want to understand what the speaker meant in this sentence. I think there is nothing more important in forming a human being than your family.
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0answers
27 views

I don't know Street address [on hold]

Do you know the Street address.i don't know please send me i read the your answer and understanding to knowldge.what is the street address please discribe him..reply
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3answers
59 views

Correct use of 'comprise'

Is this sentence grammatically correct? "The application site comprises an existing care home which has 59 bedrooms and 85 registered bed spaces" I was under the impression that 'comprise' would ...
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3answers
233 views

Give it me! Write me! [duplicate]

Our young grandson, who is a Mancunian, says 'give it me', and 'give it me back', which is a northern British standard. It made me think that it is not only northerners who omit the indirect object ...
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3answers
249 views

Why is “till” used in this expression: “If we don't leave till after lunch…”?

If we don't leave till after lunch we'll be cutting it very fine. I understand it to mean: "If we don't leave after lunch, we'll be cutting it very fine." (In the event of our not leaving ...
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1answer
124 views

Why not 'somewhy'?

When I originally wrote this ELL question, I used 'somewhy' instead of 'for some reason' for want of concision. Only afterwards, a user kindly advised that 'somewhy' obsolesced. But why? Google led ...
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1answer
32 views

Comma before “or” in a series?

Example: "Your answer must be yes, no, or maybe." Is that correctly punctuated? Thanks!
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6answers
5k views

Can you say “absolutely good”?

You often hear people follow up the word "absolutely" with words such as "fantastic", "amazing", "brilliant", "knackered". But to hear say someone say "That was absolutely good" or "I am absolutely ...
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0answers
59 views

Can 'surgery' be a count noun in the sense of 'medical procedure'?

This is something that has bothered me for a long time. Several years ago a remember noticing in the media a shift from using "An operation" to "A surgery" when talking about someone who was ...
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5answers
3k views

“Wanting” or “want”?

Lately I have noticed that a lot of people use "wanting" in sentences, or in books, but I don't get it because my English teachers have always said to me that with verbs like "love", "like", "want" ...
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0answers
43 views

Is “…that he doesn't even know where is” grammatical?

I was recently invited to a party by a Facebook friend. I asked him where the party was happening, and he said he couldn't remember the address. While texting someone else about the experience, I ...
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1answer
39 views

Correct according to British English language rules [on hold]

I have a sentence which looks as if it may have some grammar rules problems. Can someone correct it according to British English rules? I am going to hospital to see a friend who has undergone ...
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1answer
44 views

“Conceal Carry” vs. “Concealed Carry”

I have been doing some research on firearms law lately, and have run across a lot of people using the phrase "conceal carry" to describe people carrying a concealed firearm. In my opinion, this should ...
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6answers
9k views

I <verb> and am <rest of sentence>

I sometimes find myself writing something like this: XXX is a project I admire and am very interested in. The "I <verb> and am <something>" feels strange here. It somehow sounds more ...
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4answers
3k views

Check the grammar for “returned back”

Is there an error in this sentence? When Darun heard the news that his father had been hospitalised he cancelled his trip and returned back to his village. I think the error is 'back' but I need ...
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3answers
755 views

“Nobody will help you but me” vs. “Nobody will help you but I”

As has been shown in another question, in comparisons with than both the accusative and the nominative are possible and grammatical: He loves you more than I. He loves you more than me. ...
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1answer
35 views

Is this sentense correct [closed]

Is this sentence : Water come from hills. correct or not? Whether we can use "come" here for water or not?
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1answer
1k views

Is answering “Hope you had a good time! I” with “I did!” correct?

If someone says to me, "Hope you had a good time!" could I then answer "I did!" and it be grammatical? My first language is French, and I’m wondering if responding that way works in English.
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3answers
55 views

“some time” or “some times”

I've found an error identification question and its answer from a website and wonder whether this was right. The question says: He has been working here for sometimes. And the answer is: He ...
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1answer
28 views

Is it correct to start a sentence with “Not either”?

Let´s suppose a group of people is having a conversation about what they are planning to do .. they are trying to decide between 2 options and after a while one of them says: Not either one is good ...
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7answers
3k views

Can a person happen? Is “Zodanga happened” correct?

I was watching movie John Carter where there was some dialogue like this: — What happened here? — Zodanga happened. Here Zodanga was a bad guy in the movie. I don't understand how a guy ...
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2answers
69 views

Is there any difference between saying “for long” or just “long”?

For example: Is "Good sensation of freshness long after brushing" any different from "Good sensation of freshness for long after brushing?"
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1answer
28 views

Which is correct “can you get sick” or “can you get sickness”? [closed]

Get sick is the correct usage. But is the usage of "get sickness" also right? Similarly, people get tickled and also people can get ticklish? Like in the example: Maybe next year someone would get ...
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0answers
54 views

Essay: Pick one word to describe you [closed]

If I were to choose a word that describes me, I would choose the word “warrior”. To be a warrior, one has to be tough. One has to rise to the occasion whenever the hardest challenges have been placed ...
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1answer
56 views

Is it acceptable to say 'quite occasionally'

I quite occasionally play chess. Is it acceptable to say 'quite occasionally'
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2answers
86 views

If it was'nt / hadn't been for

Would I rather say He would have forgotten about the incident, if it wasn't for the huge backpack or He would have forgotten about the incident, if it hadn't been for the huge backpack or ...
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3answers
81 views

What is the correct possessive form of “Drs. Smith”

I want to address two Doctor Smiths via the abbreviation Drs. Smith; what is correct the possessive form of that (plural) noun phrase? Is it Drs. Smith's? An example sentence: Drs. Smith's house is ...
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2answers
72 views

Should I use “a” or “an” before a foreign word that starts with a “u”?

I have a foreign word that begins with the letter "u", and don't know whether to use "a" or "an". The word is "unitario". It's a word used mainly in Argentina to describe a T.V. show comprising ...
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2answers
50 views

Which is grammatically correct, “I” personally, or “me” personally?

"Good luck to each of you with your endeavors, and if the Association, or me personally, can do anything to assist you, please don't hesitate to contact me."
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3answers
8k views

“I'm not understand” — help regarding sentence structure

I am trying to learn/improve my English by remembering grammar rules. Every day, I read a lot of technical documentation and have many conversations with my colleagues from US. I already have many ...
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4answers
56 views

Should I say “study materials” or “education materials” or “teaching material?”

I am building a web application where people can upload their study materials about robotics and programming and manage them and share etc. I want to name it well, so at the moment I have: ...
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1answer
34 views

Is it grammatically correct to use “who” for inanimate objects?

Is it grammatically correct to use "who" for non-persons such as organizations, animals? Consider a question Q1: "Who should I feed?" and the answer A1: "Feed the hungry, your friends and your ...
5
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3answers
1k views

Use of “parley” meaning to convert?

I sometimes use the word "parley" as a verb effectively meaning "to convert from one language or system to another". Such as Stargate parleys the Egyptian deities into villainous star-faring ...
0
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1answer
46 views

Would this sentence be correct?

The sentence is: This is what they have been reduced to be doing to. I'm ok with understanding how This is what they have been reduced to is correct, but the to be doing to part in original ...
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3answers
49 views

How can I improve this sentence stylistically [closed]

My mother burst into tears about how I was changing. That was, for I lately indeed had begun to show some rebel attitude. Is the latter sentence understandable, clean and grammatically okay? I ...
0
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2answers
357 views

Can 'enquire' or 'inquire' be used without a preposition?

I referenced Prepositions used with "inquire". I can't pinpoint why, but I'm still wildered about "to enquire of". When can of be omitted, but still retain the same meaning as "to enquire ...
0
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0answers
37 views

Which one is right, “The text to search for must be typed in the …” or “The text to be searched must be typed in the …”?

Which one is right, "The text to search must be typed in the ..." or "The text to search for must be typed in the ..." or "The text to be searched must be typed in the ..." or "The text to be ...
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3answers
92 views

Does “Pursue Impossible” Make Grammatical Sense?

My university recently pushed a campaign for their new rebrand, and their tagline is "Pursue Impossible". I have seen a few adjectives used as nouns before but all had a definite article in front. ...
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0answers
22 views

“Uses” vs “are using” [migrated]

When do I use "Uses" and when "are using"? So: Is it eg: Computers uses RAM which is faster than disk storage. Or Computers are using RAM which is faster than disk storage. The last one sounds ...