Grammaticality refers to whether something obeys the rules of grammar for English.

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What is it called when words are deliberately written wrong but pronunciation is kept unchanged?

For example, Night -> Nite Nite even appears in some dictionaries as having the same meaning as night. What is it called when words are deliberately written incorrectly but the pronunciation ...
0
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1answer
81 views

Something happens because clause A, and clause B.

I wonder whether because can introduce two or even more reasons; if yes, how they are connected. For example, John came late because he woke up late, and his bicycle was broken. Is the sentence ...
0
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2answers
123 views

Is this sentence comprehensible?

Heyho! I've been discussing the following sentence with my girlfriend for days. For me (the author :)) it is understandable. She thinks that the point is hard to get and the sentence could be better ...
0
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2answers
50 views

Can “I would please prefer” be grammatical?

I got into a friendly argument with another user over whether a construction like I would please prefer to talk tomorrow. can be grammatical. To my eye, that just seems plain wrong. I would ...
8
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3answers
4k views

Is “of ” necessary in “all of ”?

Listen to all your fans vs Listen to all of  your fans OR Name all the states vs Name all of  the states What part of language is of  in these examples? Is it necessary or ...
6
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3answers
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Is “fake teeth” correct?

Is the phrase "fake teeth" correct? I googled it and found out that it is used. But my English tutor says that this phrase is incorrect and the book from Hillside Press had this phrase as a mistake. ...
0
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1answer
62 views

a few days every month usage

"A few days every month, he goes cycling." Is the noun phrase "a few days every month" acting as an adverb to "goes" in the above sentence? There is no preposition before the noun phrase "a few ...
0
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1answer
217 views

Can 'must' be used in a negative question?

Is it proper to write negative questions this way? You mustn't watch too much TV, must you?
4
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2answers
88 views

Can we omit the definite article, *the*, in front of two musical instruments?

My sentence is He plays the piano & the violin. Is it correct to say He plays the piano & violin?
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2answers
4k views

Usage and correctness of the term “Better than Best”

I have heard the term "Better than Best" used at few places. How is it different than saying just "best"? For example : a) He is better than the best. b) He is the best. 1) How are (a) and (b) ...
9
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6answers
12k views

What is the proper usage of “not only… but also”?

I'm trying to figure out how to use "not only... but also" properly. Basically, my goal is to combine two clauses by using "not only". For negations, I've figured out two styles that both sound ...
0
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1answer
71 views

Listing two people and yourself [duplicate]

"My brothers, my cousins, and I" "My brothers, my cousins and I" Which one is correct?
0
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2answers
47 views

Meaning of “knew from” in this sentence [duplicate]

I'm trying to understand the usage of "knew from" in the following quote: (suddenly cleaning ladies knew from sun-dried tomatoes, suddenly hog farmers knew from creme brulee) Source: The ...
1
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1answer
65 views

Is it “Does social media” or “Do social media”? [duplicate]

I am confused as to which way to say the following: "Does social media benefit people?" or "Do social media benefit people?"
1
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1answer
100 views

Why areN'T 'not least' and 'notably' interchangeable?

The example is taken from page 1 of this PDF ; The National Admissions Test for Law (LNAT): You may find, however, that answering one question helps you answer the next, not least for the purposes ...
0
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1answer
76 views

What's wrong with this sentence? How can it be improved? [on hold]

It has been a long time that I associated myself with an organisation. I'm not sure if I can use myself in this context, since there is an I already implying the same. Can I use associated - a ...
9
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2answers
4k views

Is “make due” now considered acceptable?

Whilst plodding through Patrick Rothfuss' "The Name of the Wind", I came across: Our dinner was nowhere near as grand as last night's. We made due with the last of my now-stale flatbread, dried ...
0
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0answers
24 views

I was asking for you - [on hold]

'I was asking for you' - what does it mean? I met a girl n she enquired me saying ' I was asking for you to my daughter' as she met me after a long time. Is it correct usage?
4
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2answers
5k views

How to remember using “have” instead of “of”? [on hold]

I'm (reasonably) sure these are wrong: I would of won. I could of done that. and are likely so common because if you phonetically transcribe "would've", "could've", etc, that's what you get. ...
5
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5answers
7k views

Divide two into four and Divide two by four

Why does "divide two into four" equal two, and "divide two by four" equal one half? Correct if I am wrong, but this what I have learned recently.
13
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5answers
9k views

Is it correct to say “the bird is in the tree” or “on the tree”?

In the children's rhyme: Johnny and July sitting in a tree K I S S I N G First comes love Then comes marriage Then come children in a baby carriage They are said to be sitting in a tree. ...
0
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1answer
83 views

“with” vs “to have”

I have a tendency to say things like: It was nice with cake. Usually it's in the form of: It was adjective with noun. whereas my wife is always correcting me to: It was nice to have ...
-4
votes
1answer
51 views

Which is grammatically correct [closed]

Say we have a conversation Person1 : Hi. How are you? Person2: I'm fine. How about you? Person2: I'm fine. What about you? Which of the above two is correct?
12
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2answers
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When is it OK to use OK?

I often use "OK" in business and personal emails and phone conversations. But I often feel uncertain if it is appropriate to use it in every type of context. Please tell how universally I can use ...
3
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1answer
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The difference between “have a lunch” and “have lunch”

Is there any difference between I am not having a lunch tomorrow. and I am not having lunch tomorrow. This is a follow up question of : About the use of future tense.
2
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2answers
833 views

Is the meme, “all your base are belong to us” correct for any time period?

Surely many people have heard, “all your base are belong to us”. It is a popular internet meme from 2000. The Wikipedia page calls it “broken English”, but it seems as if some translations of The ...
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0answers
23 views

what does different meaning of the difference each of tenses [closed]

I would like to ask you, what does different meaning, amongst tenses like below Rina has written a letter in Present Perfect tense Rina has been writing a letter in Present Perfect continuous ...
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8answers
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Past participle after noun: “proposed cost” vs. “cost proposed”

I have the following two examples: Our proposed cost is expensive. Our cost proposed is expensive. Is there any difference between them? Or is the second sentence wrong?
0
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1answer
42 views

use of avail in the following sentence

The employees are expected to plan their expenditure and avail loans prudently and responsibly. Is this sentence correct? Is it necessary to use of after avail in this sentence? Please give the ...
2
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1answer
101 views

“The internet is full of clothes. But only some are perfect for your shape.”

I have a slight problem with a video we're working on. I'm wondering if "some are" is correct grammatically in the following sentence. The internet is full of clothes. But only some are perfect ...
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2answers
48 views

Why must 'offices' be pluralised in 'good offices'? [closed]

Source: p 529, Blackwood's Edinburgh Magazine, Volume 119 Temple's reply was prompt aud generous. Swift was forthwith ordained, and presented by Lord Capel, the then Lord-Deputy (we are ...
0
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1answer
29 views

What is more grammatically correct? [duplicate]

what is more grammatically correct: products that were featured OR products which were featured?
0
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2answers
90 views

Position of the word ‘just’

I was just watching a tv show where they used the following sentence: He probably just hasn't gotten around to it yet It was a reply to the question, “Why didn't he inform you about it?” I want ...
0
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0answers
8 views

Which is correct: “need removed” or “need to be removed” [duplicate]

Example: "...these items need removed immediately." vs. "...these items need to be removed imediately." Which is the correct grammatical usage of "removed" in past tense? Or, is there a better ...
0
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1answer
39 views

Fraction of … IS or ARE? [duplicate]

Should I use What fraction of the residents are married? or What fraction of the residents is married? Technically, as fraction is singular, I would use the latter version. Am I correct?
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2answers
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Why should a copula link two noun phrases of the same case?

http://english.stackexchange.com/a/30392/50720 motivated this question: To quote from the clear explanation: The rule for what [Fowler] and others consider technically right is ... that ...
0
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1answer
63 views

“So shouldn't you”?

So shouldn't you: is this grammatically correct? Or is you shouldn't either the only appropriate response?
1
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3answers
56 views

What is this passive construction called?

I wonder what the tax raised is called as a sentence part shown below, and whether it's grammatical. Please suggest corrections if it isn't. The tax raised, more small enterprises will close down. ...
0
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6answers
546 views

“I am angry to die” or “I am angry to death”

I want to say that I may die because I am angry. Can I say "I am angry to die" or "I am angry to death" to express the above?
0
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1answer
59 views

Any question bank of Rewriting sentences without changing the meaning [closed]

I am having Grammar exam in a week so I am looking for nay reference on a collection of large number of questions like rewriting sentences without changing the meaning, etc. Our textbook is not good ...
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1answer
27 views

“According to our discussion, is that correct I DO this part?” is this sentence correct?

The whole sentence is here: Since this coming Sunday is the first day of March, our children need new TWA schedules, according to our discussion, is that correct I DO this part? Can I write this ...
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3answers
2k views

Can “neither” be placed at the beginning of the sentence?

Which of the following is grammatical? Trust neither a new friend nor an old enemy. Neither trust a new friend nor an old enemy.
0
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1answer
45 views

How is this sentence to be interpreted?

One thing that bothers me - a lot - reading older English texts, is the apparent tendency of writers to write what appear to me to be sentence fragments. For instance, today I found this old "map": ...
1
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1answer
75 views

May I pay “in cash” or just “cash” without in?

What is the right phrase - May I pay "in cash" or may I "pay cash"?
0
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3answers
3k views

How to correct a sentence that Word thinks is a fragment I need to revise?

I will be specific. I am trying to frame a sentence to include in a blog post. Instinctively it feels lame and wrong. Word keeps asking me to consider revising the fragment. As I am not a native ...
0
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3answers
126 views

plural or singular in this sentence

The product and the scale have changed from a small prototype to many production units. The product along with the scale has changed from a small prototype to many production units. Can ...
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1answer
24 views

Safe and sounder/soundier? [closed]

Is it safe and sounder or safe and soundier? Like we say "May God keep you safe and sounder/soundier" What is correct way to say?
2
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2answers
610 views

How to use namely correctly

Is this a correct use of namely: We will investigate two different research questions: 1. Is there a correlation between age and income? 2. Does university education lead to higher income? ...
2
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2answers
116 views

Is “more importantly” good English?

I was taught in school in the UK that it was either "more important" or "importantly," never "more importantly." We say "interestingly" or "more interesting," not "more interestingly". Is "more ...
0
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1answer
27 views

Help with this question

Please let me know if there are any grammatical mistakes in this sentence: "However,feel free to send me a follow request,If I like what your site is about,I'll follow you instead." Is there supposed ...