Grammaticality refers to whether something obeys the rules of grammar for English.

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2answers
25 views

Can we use patient as a verb?

Patienter is verb in French for to be patient. Why can't we have a verb too. It should be pronounced as in French - peshi-ent. Sentence: Could you please patient another week for your payment?
4
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0answers
28 views

Is the use of the positive anymore considered correct?

While the word anymore is usually a negative context, the positive anymore is a well-documented phenomenon. I found this surprising, because I had never come across the positive anymore in a ...
3
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3answers
2k views

About using “only” with present perfect

I have seen this sentence in a status from one of my facebook friends. It doesn't sound right to me. We have only left the city for the day. I think that it should be something like: We have ...
5
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3answers
310 views

It was dark by now

Does the following sentence make any sense? "It was dark by now, and I realized that it was time to [...]," If it was an occurrence in the past, then wouldn't referencing it as "now" be ...
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0answers
25 views

please correct: “Please inform us if we can pick up the documents we left in your office last friday.”

Is it correct to use Please inform us if we can pick up the documents we left in your office last friday.
4
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2answers
654 views

Correct use of “rid of”

From what I understood, "rid of" is used when I want to express that particular object will be disposed of something. "Get rid of something," on the other hand, does not specify the object. According ...
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2answers
49 views

“Being” or “to be”? [duplicate]

Which is better structured? "She loves to be herself instead of showing off" or "She loves being herself instead of showing off" or "She loves being and not appearing"
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5answers
61k views

Should an adverb go before or after a verb?

For example: The word rarely turns up outside of those contexts. The word turns up rarely outside of those contexts. Which one is correct and why?
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2answers
565 views

Because vs. due to with adjectives?

I know that because of modifies verbs, whereas due to modifies nouns. However, what do I do if I see something like: We find that X is better than Y in most cases, due to lack of support for Y. ...
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3answers
40 views

Usage of the phrase “type of”

I'm creating a worksheet for my students, and one of the questions asks them to identify which expression from three given expressions is correct. I am not sure how to pose the question, but I think ...
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1answer
33 views

Why does pluralization of compound words typically occur in the middle as opposed to the end of the word?

As I understand, correct plural versions of passerby and attorney general become passersby and attorneys general. But why? With passerby, the the preposition "by" has been combined with the noun ...
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2answers
65 views

Is there any difference between saying “for long” or just “long”?

For example: Is "Good sensation of freshness long after brushing" any different from "Good sensation of freshness for long after brushing?"
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1answer
59 views

Is it acceptable to start a sentence with the preposition 'except' rather than 'except for'?

The sentence Except the buildings built towards the end of his life, the buildings erected in Istanbul can be assumed to be his. was recently used in a question here. I edited to replace ...
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5answers
1k views

“Please explain” or “explain please”

Which one is correct in this context? Person A: I think Apple will displace Google. Person B: Please explain. Should he say/write "Explain please"?
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1answer
146 views

Can one say: “I wish magazines and newspapers would contain less ads.”?

I can say “I wish prices would go down”, but what about similar sentences that have an inanimate subject after 'wish'? For example, “I wish magazines and newspapers would contain fewer ads.” Can one ...
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2answers
7k views

“I wish I would wake up early”

Is this sentence correct? I wish I would wake up early Some grammar rules say that would shouldn't be used when its subject is the same as wish subject. It ‘would be illogical’, the rule says. ...
-2
votes
1answer
33 views

You can vs. You may [on hold]

I'm struggling with the use of "can" or "may" in this sentence. "Maybe you can encounter one of our relatives" or "Maybe you may encounter one of our relatives." Which is correct? Or are ...
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0answers
17 views

We can love them and let them know we care about them and their family. [duplicate]

Please correct this sentence: Indeed we can love them and let them know we care about them and their family.
4
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1answer
88 views

Finding Grammatical Error In A Model SAT sentence [on hold]

Sacajawea, a Native American woman, whose ability to translate between indigenous languages and English was extremely helpful to the explorers, Louis and Clark, on their expedition to the Pacific ...
28
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11answers
6k views

Can a sentence start with “Because”?

In my grade school days, I recall a teacher proclaiming to the class: You should never start a sentence with the word "Because". Of course, I've since seen lots of examples to the contrary, and ...
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2answers
23 views

'use of' or 'use' [on hold]

Should I use 'use of integrated' or 'use integrated'? Ability to use integrated development environment to accelerate and support the design and creation of applications process: Microsoft ...
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1answer
71 views

How old are you? or What is your age? [on hold]

Which is more common or used more and also the correct way of asking?
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0answers
41 views

The grammar behind 'above mentioned'

A colleague of mine wrote the following sentence: I have worked on the below mentioned issues: Now, I'm not a native speaker, and certainly not an authority on grammar. I construct sentences ...
1
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1answer
53 views

In what (semantic) context might “REFUSE” be used with a gerund complement?

I know that, prescriptively speaking, that the verb "refuse" is supposed to be followed by an infinitive. For example: The parents refused to buy the dangerous toy for their kid. Since language ...
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3answers
8k views

Is a comma needed to offset a title?

If I were to try and describe a book called "Book", is this sentence grammatically correct? The book Book by Joe Bob is set in... I was told that this sentence is incorrect, that commas must ...
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4answers
476 views

If I wanted to say, “There are three twos in the English language,” would “twos” be the correct spelling?

Taken from this question on a blog, how would correct usage in the situation where you are talking about "to, too and two" in the english language be phrased? Would it be along the lines of "There ...
3
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2answers
53 views

Is “switched” always used as a verb?

I was thinking that the word switched could be used as a noun and maybe an adjective too but I might just be making grammar mistakes. Switched in the dictionary only shows up as being a verb! Here ...
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4answers
5k views

If I attain a Master's degree, how do I refer to myself?

This is in reference to holding an MLS degree. Am I a "Master"? Would it be correct to say When I become a Master of Library Science, I would like to... That sounds somehow kooky, but I can't ...
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1answer
64 views

comparative clause

The following three sentences appear in the same published paper. Why does No. 1 employ the auxiliary "did" whereas the other two omit it? This could explain why ProRoot WMTA showed significantly ...
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2answers
119 views

Using “so that” instead of “ensure”

I am reviewing a set of guidelines which make frequent use of to ensure, like: The soup should be taken off the gas after cooking, to ensure that it does not burn. I want the text to be less ...
3
votes
1answer
276 views

Unless in third conditional sentences

"Jane wouldn't have found a job unless she had gone to London" is a natural-sounding sentence and has two different meanings, depending on whether Jane really did move to London or not: (1) "Jane ...
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0answers
8 views

Using past tense for retelling events, even though the logic behind the decisions made is still valid [duplicate]

This is related to this question about using past tense when speaking of something that was observed in the past, but you know it still is the same. What if you're talking about a generally held ...
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1answer
44 views

“Informing” — Gerund instead of Verb+Object?

I think if we take informing as a noun in this sentence, it should be fine. What are your views on the grammaticality of the following sentence? He left me without informing.
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0answers
32 views

Words that sound grammatically incorrect [closed]

I am looking for a list of words that sound grammatically incorrect. The only one that I have found so far is Amen because when heard outside of a sentence, it sounds incorrect, since you could ...
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2answers
194 views

“The title of Bachelor of Engineering” vs “the title Bachelor of Engineering”

... obtained the diploma and the title of Bachelor of Engineering (B.Eng.). ... obtained the diploma and the title Bachelor of Engineering (B.Eng). Which sentence is correct? Which is ...
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1answer
28 views

Is 'it' redundant in '… which God hath ordained it' ? (1899 UK)

I was reading this which linked to Prof Lawler's PDF. I thought to try the Matriculation examination in 1899 just (on p 6 of 6) to test the littleness of my linguistic knowledge: 10. "To make a ...
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4answers
1k views

“Let's see how can we do this”?

I'm reading the C++ boost library and the following sentence drew my attention: Once the two steps have been successfully completed, the process can start writing to and reading from the address ...
1
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3answers
559 views

How should this sentence be structured?

I want to know which one of these two sentence structures is correct grammatically: This book is, despite being dense, a good read. This book, despite being dense, is a good read.
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2answers
20 views

“Things are N1, N2, N3” or “Things are with N1, N2, N3”?

I wrote a sentence in my article: The most important things are: practicability, simplicity however my friend told me that the sentence should be: The most important things are with ...
1
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1answer
113 views

Non-standard sentence construction with “there is no”

I have just come across this very unusual construction, in my view at least. Is it correct and if yes, what grammar rules apply here? I would really appreciate it if anyone could help me with this and ...
56
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10answers
36k views

What is wrong with the word “performant”?

I keep getting the red underlining in Word whenever I write the word "performant". Here I intend to refer to something that performs well or better than something else (i.e., it's more performant). ...
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1answer
66 views

“You've been living here [for] too long”

Is it correct to say "You've been living here for too long"? Or is it better to drop the for? "You've been living here too long." Is either preferrable over the other for some reason?
0
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1answer
18 views

using are to name but a few

In a very formal writing style, Is it fine to use to name but a few in a separate sentence? There are a lot of algorithms to do hashing. MD5, SHA1 and CRC are to name but a few.
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4answers
324 views

What is the difference between “leading” and “winning” in a game?

Is it correct to use 'winning' or 'leading' when referring to the current state of a match/game? e.g. for a game between Patriots and Broncos in progress, if Patriots have scored higher points than ...
1
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1answer
75 views

Is the “B” in Brussels Sprouts capitalized? [closed]

It's not standard to capitalize "F" in french fries... In that case what is the proper way to write it?
9
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3answers
440 views

The use of nominative “whom”

From page 48 of Law: A Very Short Introduction, by Raymond Wacks: In other words, you owe a duty to persons whom it is foreseeable are likely to be harmed by your conduct. To try to parse this, ...
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0answers
33 views

Is This The Correct Grammar Structure for “I Thought…”? [closed]

I thought they had a dog. I thought he was injured. I thought she had breakfast. What's the general form of this grammar structure? Can I replace "thought" with just any word and it would still ...
0
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1answer
28 views

a path to v+ing / a path to + verb

which one is grammatically correct an auspicious path to fighting against rape. an auspicious path to fight rape. or maybe an auspicious path towards the fight against rape
0
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1answer
46 views

Position of adverb with respect to the adjective it modifies [closed]

The arm was so badly injured (a) that he must have (b) it amputated (c). Which part of this sentence has an error? Should it be "The arm was injured so badly." Is that right?
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2answers
236 views

What’s the difference between “for” and “to” in “for/to many people”?

Given these two versions of a sentence: For many people, dogs are the best friends. To many people, dogs are the best friends. I have following questions: What is the difference between ...