Grammaticality refers to whether something obeys the rules of grammar for English.

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“The more, the merrier!” — Is this a sentence? If not… what?

Is The more, the merrier! a sentence? It doesn't seem to have a main verb, so I'm inclined to say no, but it certainly functions as a sentence in everyday speech. I can think of three ways of ...
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17 views

The Fires are up

Can I say "The Fires are up" is this sentence correct in any way? I want to know if this statement can be used in any context possible. I have tried looking it up but found almost nothing about the ...
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32 views

Why is this complex sentence incomplete?

This clauses in this sentence seem to be grammatical and well formed. But the sentence seems to be missing something and feels incomplete in some way. Is there a grammatical problem with this ...
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60 views

Need help identifying subject in sentence with a conjunction

Currently, I am involved in a disagreement as to interpreting the grammatical meaning of the following sentence: “Restores 10% of Att as HP in battle.” Given that “Att” and “HP” are nouns (with ...
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59 views

preposition “travel in” or “travel by”

Which is the grammatically correct statement : "We are travelling in a car" Or "We are travelling by a car" Thanks in advance...
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0answers
42 views

Can “definitely” be used as a conjunction? [on hold]

Under any circumstances, is it possible for the adverb "definitively" to be used as a conjunction?
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46 views

Future: “going to [tomorrow]” vs. “will go [tomorrow]” [on hold]

I am going to London tomorrow or I will go to London tomorrow. Since there is the time marker "tomorrow", is it appropriate to use "I will go"?
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3answers
716 views

Is “reblog” a word?

I have heard from many friends that grammatically "reblog" is not a word. It's something similar to "retweet" from Twitter terminology but Tumblr use it quite frequently. Any ideas?
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3answers
278 views

Is it OK to write “Good to see you” in an email or Facebook message?

An old friend of mine wrote some greetings to me on facebook. Now if I want to answer his greetings, is it OK to write the following? "Hi, John, good to see you again" Because I don't "see" him ...
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5answers
516 views

To add someone “to” Facebook or “on” Facebook

Which one is correct and why: It was the first time a girl asked me to add her on Facebook Or It was the first time a girl asked me to add her to Facebook
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22 views

Which one is correct [on hold]

This is all I have to work with it. I am going to have a concert. I am going to put on a concert. Which one is correct.
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2answers
2k views

“The likeliest problem” vs. “the most likely problem”

The likeliest problem vs. the most likely problem: are they both correct? do they mean the same thing? is one preferable over another?
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77 views

“In my career as” — is “as” correct here?

I have this fragment: ... the experience and knowledge gained will be helpful in my career as a neuropathologist. Is the "as" here okay? It somehow does not sound right to me. Obviously I want ...
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2k views

Can someone please tell me which of the two sentences is correct?

Here are the two sentences. This was the fastest I heard someone responded. This was the fastest I heard someone respond. Can someone help me understand: A) Which one is correct, and what is ...
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10answers
2k views

What rules make “Remember me, who am your friend” grammatical?

An acquaintance recalled this specific example from an English textbook, but it is jarring to my native ear. Is this an example of prescriptive grammarians gone wild?
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0answers
16 views

which is Grammaticality correct allowed for me or allow for me [on hold]

which is Grammaticality correct? Is this allowed for me? or Is this allow for me?
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33 views

Can we say “the must info” in the sense of valuable information? [on hold]

I heard the phrase once but don't know the context of conversation. Additionally, is "the must info" grammatically correct?
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26 views

apart from + verb with gerund or not

I was reading the Rails Tutorial and I came across this: The div tag is a generic division; it doesn’t do anything apart from divide the document into distinct parts. I would say apart from ...
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2answers
486 views

“My interest in becoming” vs. “my interest to become”

I was writing a letter of application for a university. I wanted to start my letter by writing: I am writing this letter to express my interest in becoming part... and then I got confused. I am ...
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1answer
71 views

If the rule states an infinitive follows the verb “want”, why is “I don't want you worrying” correct?

Why is the sentence "I don't want you worrying about the oral interview" correct? Is the syntax want+gerund correct? Shouldn't it be I don't want you to worry about the oral interview (?) ...
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7answers
482 views

“I've gotten better-looking as I get older” When did “gotten” re-enter the BrEng vernacular?

This summer I went to Ireland, to be more precise Dublin. Overall good weather and good fun. Anyway, while I was staying in Dublin I'd buy the local newspaper and one tabloid headline caught my eye. ...
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62 views

Tense about tenses [duplicate]

*Is there a correct answer to the number of tenses in the English Languages? How can a mark be given in an examination to the question," How many tenses are there in English?" It seems that highly ...
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0answers
46 views

Isn't that the point of school, that between 8 and 3 he's your problem

I would appreciate it if anyone can comment on my analysis of the sentence, "Isn't that the point of school, that between 8 and 3 he's your problem." This is the basic form of the sentence: "That is ...
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14 views

“warmth of one another” or “one another's warmth”

"A companny of porcupines crowded themselves very close together on a cold winter's day to profit from ............ and to save themselves from being frozen to death." I need to fill in the gap with ...
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5k views

Is “Me neither” incorrect?

I've heard that "me neither" is incorrect. Instead one should say "neither do I." People definitely say "me neither" conversationally, but is it technically incorrect?
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1answer
48 views

Placement of adjective “only”

I have the following sentence and three versions to write it: Ensure string only contains printable ASCII characters. Ensure string contains only printable ASCII characters. Ensure string ...
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1answer
65 views

Do we say “After 7th grade” or “After THE 7th grade”

I would like to ask if we say "After 7th grade" or "After THE 7th grade" Thank you
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34 views

Delayed relative clause

Consider the following phrase taken from a draft of my master's thesis: In this chapter, the fundamental physiological principles will be presented that underlie the mathematical models and ...
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4k views

Should I use 'or' or 'nor'?

This document does not cover the SDK interfaces nor any other reference material. I think the above is correct, but my grammatical checker in Microsoft Word underlines nor and suggests or. Why?
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7answers
4k views

Is “gift” accepted as a verb?

I have always argued adamantly, as long as the issue has been around, that gift should never be used as a verb. However, someone whose English knowledge I quite respect disagrees. I’ve done some ...
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4answers
167 views

If I can “fall in” love, can I “fall in” depression?

In Italian we say essere innamorato (to be in love) whereas the English idiom, to fall in love, expresses the idea of abandoning control, of letting oneself go. mi sono innamorato (I am in ...
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877 views

“Heard my mom cry/crying”, “leave the door lock/locked”

Two simple examples: a. I heard my mom cry. b. I heard my mom crying. a. Please leave the door lock always. b. Please leave the door locked always. Which one, a or b, is right?
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25 views

“I can do it too” [migrated]

Can you say "I can do it too" meaning that I can also do what someone else just did? I had an argument with my mate who is a native speaker (or that's what she claims). I was pretty sure you can say ...
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42 views

Is there any difference between saying “for long” or just “long”?

For example: Is "Good sensation of freshness long after brushing" any different from "Good sensation of freshness for long after brushing?"
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72 views

The bottom graph shows the acceleration profiles, while the top the corresponding speed changes

Are the verb and noun omissions in the following sentence correct? (The words enclosed in parentheses are the omitted ones.) The bottom graph shows the acceleration profiles, while the top (graph) ...
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28 views

proper use of the word myself [duplicate]

Is it ever proper to use myself and when starting a sentence? Here is an example of what I mean: Myself and some very successful people are building a team across the Globe! or Myself and (Name) are ...
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36 views

“What” = “the thing” in the beginning of the sentence

Is the sentence What he didn't know is that in the future (...) correct? The meaning should be similar to "The thing that he didn't know..."
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4answers
902 views

Tenses for two clauses joined by “if only”

Our school had won the match if only we have concentrated. Our school would have won the match if only we would have concentrated. Our school would win the match if only we had concentrated. ...
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2answers
63 views

Why does switch take a noun in the plural?

Why do we say "We switched locations." or "We switched phones." instead of "We switched location?" or "We switched phone?" Are there any other verbs that take the noun in the plural?
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“List of Xs” vs “X list”

Is there a difference in meaning between "List of Xs" and "X list"? For example, does "task list" means the same thing as "list of tasks"? What about grammar? Can they be used interchangeably in a ...
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1answer
51 views

“Due to lack of / For lack of”? [closed]

Which of these statements is grammatically sound? : I would like to point out that I have already graduated and have marked 5th year in the question regarding the current status of my education due ...
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2answers
102 views

“Jimmy did his homework and so didn't his brother” Is this correct?

Shouldn't it be "...and so did his brother"? I got confused when I read the original sentence in an American newspaper some time ago. It read something like this: "US Representative from ...
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4answers
59 views

Using “ex” on a genitive

I’ve constructed this headline: “Opera Mini to become the default browser on Microsoft’s (ex Nokia’s) feature phones” So, the phones in question used to be produced by Nokia, but Microsoft has ...
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2answers
49 views

Is it correct to say “I realized that you are truly lost.”

Is it correct to say "I realized that you are truly lost." instead of "I realized that you were truly lost"? Because realized is past tense, I'm not sure whether using "you are" instead of "you were" ...
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4answers
44 views

Participation v Participancy

I'm really curious as to know when you'd use participancy over participation. Right now Chrome is telling me that participancy is wrong and not a word. I always believed it to be a word and it is in ...
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4answers
6k views

Is 'long time no see' grammatically correct?

I have researched and found out long time no see is a direct translate from the Chinese phrase, 好久不见. As much as we use it almost everyday in our lives, is it actually grammatically correct? Since it ...
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looking for appositive that-which phrases

I asked sentences having an appositive that-which phrase like the following sentence in English Language Learners. The insect propagates best near "disturbed land," that which is being cultivated ...
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3answers
132 views

Is this usage of 'of which' correct?

I'm working on an employee manual and I came across this one: "Our team philosophy is to become the best of which we are capable." Is this a correct sentence? The point it's trying to get across is ...
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0answers
22 views

“It had now been two weeks since he had left the house” [migrated]

It had now been two weeks since he had left the house. Is this use of since correct? Is the tense of the verb after it correct?
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3answers
170 views

“Sorry for bothering you” vs. “sorry to bother you” [closed]

Is it grammatically OK to use "Sorry for bothering you"? I often hear "Sorry to bother you".