Grammaticality refers to whether something obeys the rules of grammar for English.

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Which is more grammatically correct;

Which is more grammatically correct - a guide to things to do or a guide of things to do?
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4answers
92 views

What kind of error is: “He should be consequenced”?

I've been watching The Sopranos recently; a very useful vehicle for picking up American pronunciation and mob slang. In series one, episode seven, Tony Soprano and his wife Carmela are in the school ...
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3answers
119 views

Is “back the hall” accepted usage?

In response to the question "Where is she?", I've heard someone say, "She's back the hall." (Cf. "She's back there.") I understand the meaning to be something like "She's down the hall," "She's in the ...
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1answer
60 views

Is it correct to shorten “you have” to “you've”? [on hold]

If "you are" can be shortened to "you're", can "you have" be shortened to "you've"? Is it acceptable? If yes, what are the situations where it can be used?
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62 views

What Do You Call It when a Noun is Used as a Verb?

Like "Petition": I signed a 'petition,' and carried it onward to 'petition' for support of lower wages & more suffering etc.
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3answers
28 views

Is a verb pattern possible [on hold]

Is this sentence correct: The teacher told every single one of the pupils rewrite their essays.
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2answers
49 views

Do both sides of the conjunction need to align with the next part of the sentence?

If someone can improve my title, please do. I seem to be missing some vocabulary. I was writing an SO answer and ran into something that has always bothered me. Consider the following sentence: ...
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1answer
49 views

use of avail in the following sentence

The employees are expected to plan their expenditure and avail loans prudently and responsibly. Is this sentence correct? Is it necessary to use of after avail in this sentence? Please give the ...
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1answer
129 views

“The internet is full of clothes. But only some are perfect for your shape.”

I have a slight problem with a video we're working on. I'm wondering if "some are" is correct grammatically in the following sentence. The internet is full of clothes. But only some are perfect ...
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1answer
20 views

'For while …, yet …' : Right quantity and use of conjunctions?

For while the capacity to overcome all opposing sensible impulses can and must be simply presupposed in man on account of his freedom, yet this capacity as strength is something he must acquire. ...
2
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1answer
102 views

What does “#Race together” mean? Is this a perfect English sentence?

Starbucks decided to stop their baristas writing “Race together” on customers’ cups in response to raging public criticism. Totally apart from political, social, or racial dispute involved in this ...
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2answers
112 views

Position of the word ‘just’

I was just watching a tv show where they used the following sentence: He probably just hasn't gotten around to it yet It was a reply to the question, “Why didn't he inform you about it?” I want ...
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1answer
20 views

the use of “but your request to verify your inquiry” is gramatically error or is it accepted? [on hold]

We apologize for the inconvenience, but your request to verify your inquiry cannot be resolved via email.
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32 views

Sentence starts with “Of” [on hold]

Speaking at the Playful conference in London on Friday, Machon paid tribute to Edward Snowden, who revealed details of surveillance by the US’s National Security Agency (NSA), for revealing the ...
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1answer
70 views

“So shouldn't you”?

So shouldn't you: is this grammatically correct? Or is you shouldn't either the only appropriate response?
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2answers
61 views

“It's a long time that” - correct or not?

I recently used the following phrasing in an fictional informal dialogue: It's a long time that I did this. Someone (a native speaker of English) corrected me and told me that I should use ...
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3answers
50 views

Should I use Singular or Plural for “Donor(s) List”? [duplicate]

To be recognized in the Saddle River Donors List and help the Saddle River community, please include your tax free donation: Should it be Donors or Donor?
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0answers
31 views

questions in 5 common sentences [on hold]

I've got several questions quoted with bold and need your thoughts in here. All sources are from US native speakers: (1) The second thing is to raise an objection to being sued that is unrelated ...
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1answer
54 views

to- infinitive: Is it correct to say or ask…? [on hold]

Is it correct to say or ask: What is a rich man to do with no light in his eyes? (meaning: What is it that a depressive rich man can do?) What is a rich man to do but hide? (meaning: ...
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9answers
25k views

Is it correct to say “The reason is because …”?

In a statement like The weeds have grown overnight. The reason is because it rained yesterday Is "the reason is because" good grammar? Isn't it better to say The weeds have grown overnight ...
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1answer
451 views

Can the antecedent ever be in a prepositional phrase?

It seems like a basic concept, but I want to make sure. Can the antecedent ever be in a prepositional phrase? For example: Jill likes running with Julie. She is a good person. Does she refer to ...
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1answer
102 views

Is English considered easier to learn than most of the other languages in the world? [closed]

In comparison to the other languages, I think English is much more simpler. For example, compared to French, English nouns have no gender, adjectives have only one form and verbs have extremely simple ...
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2answers
47 views

“may you” or “can you”? [on hold]

Which is correct? Can you please fax me the document? May you please fax me the document?
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3answers
15k views

Why is this sentence correct? “She suggested that he go to the cinema.”

Why is this sentence correct? She suggested that he go to the cinema. I would definitely use goes instead of go.
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39 views

“suffered problems” or “suffered by problems”? [closed]

The minister suffered problems The minister was suffered by problems What is the correct one?
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138 views

How do you say if something is as hard as something else?

Today I wanted to tell that buying a car for me is as hard as choosing a dish in a restaurant and I actually meant that I am picky on buying a car just like my eating habit. But I stuck in the middle ...
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6answers
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I <verb> and am <rest of sentence>

I sometimes find myself writing something like this: XXX is a project I admire and am very interested in. The "I <verb> and am <something>" feels strange here. It somehow sounds more ...
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0answers
29 views

Which of these is right? [closed]

Loving you WAS... Loving you WERE... Who is the subject on this sentence? I searched it on google, it says "was" is the right one but why?
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5answers
28k views

“Improvement in/on/of/to something”

What is the correct preposition to use after improvement? For example, The successful candidate is expected to contribute with an improvement of the current calibration.
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6answers
537 views

“Have some reason you” or “Have some reason why you”

Can the "why" be removed from the phrase "have some reason why you?" Example: Do you have some reason you ____? vs. Do you have some reason why you ____? Are these both grammatically ...
3
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1answer
73 views

Why do people say “Go down this road” or “Go down this corridor” instead of saying “Go straight” [closed]

I was wondering, when giving directions, is it correct to say "go straight" instead of "go down"? Does down and straight in the context of giving directions mean the same thing?
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1answer
41 views

Help with this question [closed]

Please let me know if there are any grammatical mistakes in this sentence: "However,feel free to send me a follow request,If I like what your site is about,I'll follow you instead." Is there supposed ...
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0answers
56 views

Is using a sentence as a subject grammatically correct?

For example: Attack them directly won't do anything "Attack them directly" is a partial sentence. In this sentence, we treat that whole phrase as a subject and make a sentence from the phrase. ...
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2answers
1k views

“My interest in becoming” vs. “my interest to become”

I was writing a letter of application for a university. I wanted to start my letter by writing: I am writing this letter to express my interest in becoming part... and then I got confused. I am ...
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0answers
53 views

I'll be curious

Just wondering if it is correct to say "I'll be curious to". For example, I used the sentence "I'll be curious to read them [the text messages] later". Do I actually mean to say "I am curious to read ...
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9answers
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Is “non-vegetarian” a correct word?

I've heard that the words "non-veg" and "non-vegetarian" are not legal English words (i.e aren't in the dictionary). Is this true? If so, what is the right way to say that something contains ...
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1answer
42 views

Which one is the correct dialogue punctuation format? [closed]

I am writing my first novel and this the very first confusion I would like to clarify. As I am not a native English speaker, I find it very hard to understand the punctuation scheme in direct ...
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0answers
38 views

Would it be 'meet' or 'have met' in this structure?

If I bumped into someone, who happened to be called John, yesterday, and I am telling someone else of the encounter, would I say: I happened to meet John yesterday. or I happened to have ...
3
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4answers
532 views

Past tense of “to cast” in the programming sense

In programming, to cast (also: to typecast) means to convert an object from one type to another (see Wikipedia). I'd like to know the correct past tense of to cast in this sense. Is it cast or ...
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3answers
12k views

“Exchanged with” vs. “exchanged for”

Is "exchanged with" grammatically correct and does it mean the same thing as "exchanged for?" "For" and "with" don't normally seem interchangeable, so these two phrases should be different, yet they ...
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3answers
1k views

“Cash on me” vs. “cash with me”

I know you would normally say, "I don't have any cash on me". But would it be grammatically correct to say, "I don't have any cash with me"?
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1answer
51 views

Should I use a comma before the conjunction in this sentence? [duplicate]

The sentence The movie was loud and the chatter was louder. Should I need to add a comma before the and that joins the first sentence The movie was loud and the independent clause the chatter ...
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2answers
1k views

Should I place “me” and “I” in the same sentence?

I'm helping my stepdaughter write a cover letter and we are at odds as to whether this sentence is structurally and grammatically correct. My experience in customer service qualifies me for this ...
2
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1answer
215 views

Is this sentence missing a verb?

This quote comes from an article published online at USA Today, but it strikes me as odd and not correct. Am I right, or do I misunderstand the sentence? Obama stopped short of saying how high up ...
2
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3answers
95 views

Can I say : “He was made broke”?

He doesn't have any money. He was made broke in 1999. Is it grammatically correct to use this structure?
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1answer
36 views

What would you do if I told you+subordinate clause

there are a couple of sentences that I have been having trouble with lately. I'll start with an example: I'd be lying if I said I have never considered moving.(referring to the present) That's how ...
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2answers
63 views

Is there any difference between saying “for long” or just “long”?

For example: Is "Good sensation of freshness long after brushing" any different from "Good sensation of freshness for long after brushing?"
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2answers
379 views

Is it appropriate to use “it's” as a contraction for “it is” here?

I saw this in an English text, and I was wondering if the "it's" here is used correctly: The morality of it’s debatable but you can ... I would be inclined to write it as: The morality of it ...
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2answers
219 views

“had initially” vs. “initially had” [closed]

As in: I initially had planned to cite my sources. Rather than: I had initially planned to cite my sources.
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4answers
3k views

“This was the fastest I heard someone [respond/responded]” - which to use, and why?

Here are the two sentences. This was the fastest I heard someone responded. This was the fastest I heard someone respond. Can someone help me understand: A) Which one is correct, and what is ...