Grammaticality refers to whether something obeys the rules of grammar for English.

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Which is correct: “A is higher as compared that” OR “A is high as compared to”?

The weight of A is higher as compared that of its counterparts. The weight of A is high as compared to that of its counterparts. Which word is more suitable —'high' or 'higher'?
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2answers
75 views

Why Is “You did well.” Even Grammatically Correct (American English)?

One of the classic battles prescriptive grammarians fight is that "You did good." is grammatically wrong, while "You did well." is correct. The justification for this is that "well" is a legitimate ...
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20 views

Why does switch take a noun in the plural?

Why do we say "We switched locations." or "We switched phones." instead of "We switched location?" or "We switched phone?" Are there any other verbs that take the noun in the plural?
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1answer
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Is this what these sentences mean?

"I don't like neither of you" -> In this sentence I think the meaning is that the person doesn't dislike any of the other people. "I haven't done it neither" -> This is just a confusing double ...
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2answers
59 views

No one + plural verb

The sentence is: No one forget about the issue, please. From what I've read on the internet, 'no one' always takes a singular verb, but somehow 'no one forgets' doesn't sound right to me. But I ...
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5answers
459 views
+50

Is it grammatical to say “the batmen”?

As far as I know, the five actors to have played the role of Batman in films are Adam West, Michael Keaton, Val Kilmer, George Clooney, and Christian Bale. Is it grammatical to call them "the batmen"? ...
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3answers
77 views

The day started off incredibly terribly?

Is it grammatically correct to say: The day started off incredibly terribly. My reasoning is that it is, since this is correct: The day started off terribly. The manner in which the day ...
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4answers
46 views

Can “either” be used with “nor”? [duplicate]

Can I say, for example, "You aren't either pretty nor funny"? And if so, is it any different from saying "You aren't either pretty or funny"?
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2answers
589 views

Can you use “little” to modify an adjective?

For example, can you say, the toothpaste is little minty, or little fresh. Or for example, that man is little tall.
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0answers
17 views

three sentences in one sentence [on hold]

can you tell me my mistakes in this sentence? "trays represented in green have 100mm width and for 250VAC." -we have a project drawing and there are green paths for trays -these trays have 100mm ...
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1answer
40 views

Can I use “How about..” in this way?

So, imagine that you wanted to suggest something to a friend of yours, like watching TV or go to the movies. You would say "How about watching TV?" or "What about going to the movies?" But what if you ...
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0answers
11 views

Is the sentence below correct [on hold]

With reference to the Company’s letter no. 01, we agree to the points mentioned therein.
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2answers
63 views

“Who is” vs. “Who are” [on hold]

The beginning of a title reads, *Who are doing Jehovah's Will.. which doesn’t sound correct to me. To me, *Who is doing Jehovah's Will sounds more correct. Am I wrong, or can both be used in the ...
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7answers
5k views

Is a sentence always grammatically incorrect if it has no verb?

Is the following grammatically correct? My friend says the second sentence is grammatically incorrect, but couldn't explain why. I have always been fascinated by statistics. The different ways in ...
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1answer
77 views

Literature: 'Why' at the beginning of sentences [duplicate]

I’m currently reading George Martin’s A Song Of Ice And Fire novels in English. As a non-native speaker (I’m German), I stumbled upon some grammatical constructs that I’ve never seen before, one of ...
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5answers
2k views

The correct usage of 'Not only' in the beginning of a negative sentence

Friends, would you please tell me if I use "Not only,but also" correctly? 1- Not only have these conditions been not prepared in developed countries, but developing countries also have not accepted ...
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2answers
23k views

“Alternately” or “alternatively”

What is the difference between alternately and alternatively? I've seen both words being used, but which one is grammatically correct? He could do X. Or alternately, he could do Y. He could do ...
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2answers
78 views

“I have no idea what I'm doing”. Is this sentence correct? [on hold]

Because I don't know it just seems that something is missing despite knowing that nothing is missing. I keep wondering if it shouldn't be something like "I have no idea of what I'm doing" or something ...
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2answers
29 views

Is there any difference between saying “for long” or just “long”?

For example: Is "Good sensation of freshness long after brushing" any different from "Good sensation of freshness for long after brushing?"
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3answers
19 views

Uses of model perfect with a future event that was planned, but then cancelled [on hold]

Can you say, "The meeting would have been tomorrow, but they cancelled it yesterday?"
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0answers
40 views

We can say really big, and it makes the thing we're talking about bigger than the usual big. Is there a way of saying not so big? [migrated]

But I don't want to be saying "It is not that big" -> it is bigger, but smaller than the usual I want to know if there is a work of the same type as "really" that decreses the ammount of "bigness" ...
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8answers
9k views

Should I say “there is a handful of…” or “there are a handful of…”? [duplicate]

I want to write that I have handful of somethings. Which of these is the correct form? There is a handful of somethings. There are a handful of somethings. Are both correct?
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9answers
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What is wrong with the word “performant”?

I keep getting the red underlining in Word whenever I write the word "performant". Here I intend to refer to something that performs well or better than something else (i.e., it's more performant). ...
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1answer
67 views

Is “Even I too.” a valid sentence?

Consider the following conversations: A: "I must leave now because I have to be home in 30 minutes." B: "Even I too." A: "I am getting bored." B: "Even I too." Is the response valid? I ...
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4answers
66 views

Order of words and punctuation in a sentence [on hold]

I am writing a sentence whose word order and punctuation has put me in a fix. Can I get some opinions on whether the construction is correct, grammatically? Ask him what becomes of the dogs he ...
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1answer
633 views

Can I end this sentence with “also” or “too”? Which one is right?

Please see the sentences: I scheduled to stay after school with you today, but yesterday I was assigned a detention for today too. I scheduled to stay after school with you today, but ...
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1answer
34 views

Functionality vs. Functionalities: are both correct pluralizations?

To me, inasmuch as use of the word functionality referring to software means the extent of its overall ability, I would write "The software implements the following functionality." However, I've seen ...
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0answers
13 views

sentences that show correct pronoun agreement [closed]

Neither Claire nor Elise had her application completed in time to be considered by the university. is it correct
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3answers
8k views

“Neither” and “either” usage in negative sentence

I would like to make sure I understood the usage of these: Do you want A or B? I do not want either. [none of them] I want neither. [Can I say that?]
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2answers
5k views

Is the usage “can able to” wrong? I believe it's wrong. But where can I find some reference on the same?

I hear a lot of people use 'can able to' in their daily talk. I believe it's entirely wrong. Both 'can' and 'able to' hold the same meaning. Where do I get more information on the same and also the ...
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2answers
5k views

Can one answer “Have you got…?” with “Yes, I've got.”?

As an American in Europe I often get questions about the British "have got" which is hard for me to answer since I have little feeling for what is correct. E.g. someone today asked me: If someone ...
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4answers
9k views

“Haven't you?” or “don't you?”

What is the right question tag (in British English) when we use the verb have? I have interviewed a few native speakers and none of them could explain why sometimes they prefer "haven't/hasn't" and ...
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2answers
86 views

Is this usage of 'of which' correct?

I'm working on an employee manual and I came across this one: "Our team philosophy is to become the best of which we are capable." Is this a correct sentence? The point it's trying to get across is ...
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0answers
57 views

What's the difference between “is done” vs “has been done” and “is to be done” vs “should be done”? [closed]

Please tell me the differences between the sentences below, and which sentence you think is the most idiomatic in English: What is to be done is done; there is no more to be done What is to ...
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0answers
32 views

wedding invite template [closed]

I sent the below wedding invite to few of my friends for proof reading Born unknown to each other, we are stepping into a new beginning of wedded life, with new dreams, new hopes, new aspirations ...
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5answers
15k views

Is “might could” a correct construct?

I have a friend from the southern U.S. who uses the phrase “might could” quite often. He’ll say, for example: I might could do that this weekend. When I first heard him say this, it made me do ...
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2answers
98 views

Is this a correct English sentence: “I'm not quite well enough ready yet.”

I was talking to someone recently and blurted out as I had to move on to another task "I am not quite well enough ready yet" which sparked a discussion about if that was correct English. Although I'll ...
2
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2answers
3k views

“For how long have you been…” vs. “how long have you been…”

Ante-scriptum: The question should be quite a frequently arising one, so this might be a duplicate. If it is, I haven't found it previously asked here I don't know if the title is meaningful, but ...
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3answers
1k views

How to understand “It takes a little bit of getting used to the idea…”?

The following sentence is from a mathematical lecture note here: It takes a little bit of getting used to the idea of a function that cannot actually be evaluated at any specific point, but with ...
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2answers
47 views

I want the exact answer and difference between these two? [closed]

have you spoke to her (or) have you speak to her? Which is correct?
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3answers
21k views

Is “Thanks a ton” a commonly used phrase?

Is it correct to say so? Does this mean the same as "thanks a lot"?
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2answers
143 views

In what dialects is “I don't like it too” grammatical?

Consider: Too — (adv.) also, as well, in addition. We don’t usually use too in negative clauses; we use either instead: I don’t like that kind of stuff. I don’t like it either. That said, ...
9
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4answers
862 views

“Would have” in conditional clauses

I have been taught to use the if I had form in conditional clauses referring to the past: If the president had asked me, I would have told him the same thing. As far as I can tell though, the ...
3
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2answers
184 views

Do the -ing and to-infinitive “verbs” that follow catenative verbs always take the grammatical function of “noun”?

I'm wondering whether or not the verb form that follows a catenative verb has the grammatical function of a noun or of a verb, and whether or not it depends on the first catenative verb. "I like to ...
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2answers
67 views

Different between 'effect' and 'impact'

Someone asks me this question: 'How much work is it to fix issue? then I'm trying to determine potential impact.' My answer is that 'very little work should to be done to fix this issue. And there is ...
3
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1answer
52 views

Unless in third conditional sentences

"Jane wouldn't have found a job unless she had gone to London" is a natural-sounding sentence and has two different meanings, depending on whether Jane really did move to London or not: (1) "Jane ...
5
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3answers
117 views

Verb agreement in “Where is the Messiah and his Kingdom?”

Where is the Messiah and his Kingdom? I think it should be "Where are the Messiah and his kingdom"; it just sounds better! But my friends and even a teacher claim that "is" would be correct.
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0answers
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When can a singular verb be used for multiple distinct subjects? [duplicate]

I've read "Are" vs. "is" with compound subjects and http://www.grammar.cl/Present/ThereIsThereAre.htm, so this doesn't duplicate, because here, the subjects are disparate. "The ...
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1answer
63 views

Can one use 'prepare' instead of 'be prepared' or 'be ready'?

a) - The document you requested will take four days to be ready. b) - The document you requested will take four days to prepare. Does (b) give the same meaning as (a)? Is this a correct way to use ...
3
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1answer
65 views

Is it grammatical to use “same” or “the same” in substitution for an objective pronoun?

I've seen and heard this usage of the pronoun "same" more than once, and it sounded strange to my ears: "Thank you for the book; I will return same shortly." "Wine production has increased, ...