Grammaticality refers to whether something obeys the rules of grammar for English.

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'For while …, yet …' : Right quantity and use of conjunctions?

For while the capacity to overcome all opposing sensible impulses can and must be simply presupposed in man on account of his freedom, yet this capacity as strength is something he must acquire. ...
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“Wrote it I did” Is this grammatical?

Are the sentences below grammatical? Write it I have. Wrote it I did. What reasons are there to think that they are or aren't? These sentences both involve pre-posed verb phrases, a ...
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30 views

Laugh to world to world laugh to you is grammatical

I want to know this statement is grammatical? Laugh to world to world laugh to you I had this statements too: Laugh to world then world will laugh to you. & World will laugh to you ...
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1answer
43 views

“I'll be upset with someone”: Is this sentence (a) acceptable (b) idiomatic?

I saw someone post on Facebook "I'll be upset with someone". Is there a better way to say this?
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119 views

Is it acceptable to start a sentence with the preposition 'except' rather than 'except for'?

The sentence Except the buildings built towards the end of his life, the buildings erected in Istanbul can be assumed to be his. was recently used in a question here. I edited to replace ...
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376 views

Subject/Complement Agreement. How to describe problem with “The thing is the objects.”

In my ell answer, version 32, I provided the following, problematic, wording (especially bold italic), and I need help to better understand this issue so I can fix my answer:1 The thing is ...
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Please find a word that it is not grammatically correct to begin a sentence or question?

Multiple questions herein ask "Is it grammatically correct to begin a sentence or question with X?" So, I'm definitively asking, are there any words for which it is absolutely not grammatically ...
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1answer
41 views

why is it wrong to say: “Nowadays women have a considerable more role.” [on hold]

Is it wrong to say: "Nowadays women have a considerable more role." Grammatically speaking why exactly is it wrong?
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2answers
19 views

Consistency between noun and verb

Which one of the following is grammatically correct? 1. Individual prisoners are directed to their respective cell 2. Individual prisoners is directed to his/her respective cell
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76 views

“So shouldn't you”?

So shouldn't you: is this grammatically correct? Or is you shouldn't either the only appropriate response?
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1answer
94 views

“I guess Americans are hated a lot of places.” What's wrong with this sentence exactly?

From Cat's Cradle (Vonnegut). "The highest possible form of treason," said Minton, "is to say that Americans aren't loved wherever they go, whatever they do. Claire tried to make the point the ...
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1answer
37 views

How to form possessive from “belongs to X (preposition) Y”

This is none's of us business. Everyone's in the room pockets were empty. The car isn't anyone's from this town. Are the sentences correct? If not, how should they be phrased correctly?
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“Sally broke her leg” vs. “Sally has broken her leg” Does switching the past simple with the present perfect affect its meaning?

Earlier today I had a private lesson with an Italian student—intermediate level, who has been studying the present perfect vs. past simple tense. His teacher had given him an exercise where a list of ...
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2answers
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“If not for you” meaning

Today I have encountered a phrase: If not for you, I would be poor. I would think it is like "if there were not you", is it like that? On the other hand, how would I say the following as the ...
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4answers
855 views

“This box of matches is empty”

There are several Japanese books teaching Japanese students how to write in English. I found this example in 『英作文参考書の誤りを正す』 (Correcting Errors in English Composition Manuals) by Michio Kawakami and ...
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1answer
48 views

Imroving my message [closed]

I am Mexican and my English is good, but there is a chance to make a mistake. I am gonna leave city after living here for 20 years and moving to new city. I have made many friends and memories right ...
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0answers
39 views

Fill in the blanks [on hold]

Beatles____________ are familiar with even the______________ of the band's history,including thefact that before Ringo starr joined the band their drummer was pete Best. a)fanatics.minutiae b)zealots. ...
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2answers
533 views

The grammar of 'clothes' versus 'clothing'

Which of these is correct: I didn't realize how much clothes you had on the floor I didn't realize how much clothing you had on the floor Any additional explanation about clothes versus ...
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Usage of “Science and technology” as a singular term

Should we use singular verb with the subject/subjects "science and technology"? For example, Science and technology have a prominent influence in the modern world. Is this sentence correct? Please ...
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29 views

Is the phrase “horizon road” grammatically correct?

Is the phrase "horizon road" grammatically correct, and if so, is it equal to "road to horizon"?
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1answer
38 views

Can I use “too” at the end of a sentence? [on hold]

Can I use "too" at the end of a sentence? For example: They will guide in your interaction with family, friends, associates and loved-ones in a way that is healthy for you and all that you are ...
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2answers
324 views

'of' in 'to inquire of'

I read this, but of 's meaning confuses me in: to inquire of. 3. Which definition matches? Is of a particle or a preposition? For example, consider the following Notice to Counsel at the US Supreme ...
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39 views

Suggest to or Suggest

Do I say I suggest you not go there. or I suggest you to not go there.? Or are they complete wrong, needing to say going? Thanks
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“More so” or moreso?

I often find myself using the two words joined together, moreso. I'm not sure where I picked up this usage. I'm also not sure that it's necessarily the correct one, as some proofreading tools will ...
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1answer
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“Take/Consider … as an example” vs “Take/Consider … for example”

For more than a decade, I have always seen/used the phrase "Take/Consider ... as an example" followed by a comma. Then, my recent visit on this page got me confused and raised more questions in me. ...
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67 views

Can I say “more funny” or “most funny” instead of “funnier” or “funniest”?

Could you please provide a reference to your answer whatever it is? I know that "funnier" and "funniest" are more correct, but I want to know whether the less common versions are considered errors or ...
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547 views

Can an English sentence have a 'dative subject'?

I have been thinking about this for a while. It seems to me that, sometimes, the subject plays a dative role in that it is the recipient of something. Take the following active sentence. He gave ...
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'within few next days' OR 'within next few days'?

Which of the following sentences is grammatically correct? and why? The project will be completed within next few days. OR The project will be completed within few next days.
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Ordered it Offline vs Ordered it Online

I'm new to this site so i don't know the proper formatting for questions here. My friends and I were having a debate whether or not saying "I ordered it offline" was a correct way to say "I ordered ...
4
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1answer
65 views

The grammar behind 'above mentioned'

A colleague of mine wrote the following sentence: I have worked on the below mentioned issues: Now, I'm not a native speaker, and certainly not an authority on grammar. I construct sentences ...
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4answers
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When listing features of something, do I need to use “it” before “has”?

For example: The smartphone is blue, small, lightweight, (it) has three buttons, two cameras... Is the "it" relevant? Can I omit it?
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Is the use of the positive anymore considered correct?

While the word anymore is usually a negative context, the positive anymore is a well-documented phenomenon. I found this surprising, because I had never come across the positive anymore in a ...
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2answers
47 views

Can we use patient as a verb?

Patienter is verb in French for to be patient. Why can't we have a verb too. It should be pronounced as in French - peshi-ent. Sentence: Could you please patient another week for your payment?
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3answers
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About using “only” with present perfect

I have seen this sentence in a status from one of my facebook friends. It doesn't sound right to me. We have only left the city for the day. I think that it should be something like: We have ...
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3answers
325 views

It was dark by now [duplicate]

Does the following sentence make any sense? "It was dark by now, and I realized that it was time to [...]," If it was an occurrence in the past, then wouldn't referencing it as "now" be ...
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please correct: “Please inform us if we can pick up the documents we left in your office last friday.”

Is it correct to use Please inform us if we can pick up the documents we left in your office last friday.
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2answers
656 views

Correct use of “rid of”

From what I understood, "rid of" is used when I want to express that particular object will be disposed of something. "Get rid of something," on the other hand, does not specify the object. According ...
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2answers
53 views

“Being” or “to be”? [duplicate]

Which is better structured? "She loves to be herself instead of showing off" or "She loves being herself instead of showing off" or "She loves being and not appearing"
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Should an adverb go before or after a verb?

For example: The word rarely turns up outside of those contexts. The word turns up rarely outside of those contexts. Which one is correct and why?
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570 views

Because vs. due to with adjectives?

I know that because of modifies verbs, whereas due to modifies nouns. However, what do I do if I see something like: We find that X is better than Y in most cases, due to lack of support for Y. ...
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3answers
41 views

Usage of the phrase “type of”

I'm creating a worksheet for my students, and one of the questions asks them to identify which expression from three given expressions is correct. I am not sure how to pose the question, but I think ...
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1answer
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Why does pluralization of compound words typically occur in the middle as opposed to the end of the word?

As I understand, correct plural versions of passerby and attorney general become passersby and attorneys general. But why? With passerby, the the preposition "by" has been combined with the noun ...
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Is there any difference between saying “for long” or just “long”?

For example: Is "Good sensation of freshness long after brushing" any different from "Good sensation of freshness for long after brushing?"
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5answers
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“Please explain” or “explain please”

Which one is correct in this context? Person A: I think Apple will displace Google. Person B: Please explain. Should he say/write "Explain please"?
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146 views

Can one say: “I wish magazines and newspapers would contain less ads.”? [closed]

I can say “I wish prices would go down”, but what about similar sentences that have an inanimate subject after 'wish'? For example, “I wish magazines and newspapers would contain fewer ads.” Can one ...
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“I wish I would wake up early”

Is this sentence correct? I wish I would wake up early Some grammar rules say that would shouldn't be used when its subject is the same as wish subject. It ‘would be illogical’, the rule says. ...
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1answer
36 views

You can vs. You may [closed]

I'm struggling with the use of "can" or "may" in this sentence. "Maybe you can encounter one of our relatives" or "Maybe you may encounter one of our relatives." Which is correct? Or are ...
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We can love them and let them know we care about them and their family. [duplicate]

Please correct this sentence: Indeed we can love them and let them know we care about them and their family.
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1answer
96 views

Finding Grammatical Error In A Model SAT sentence [closed]

Sacajawea, a Native American woman, whose ability to translate between indigenous languages and English was extremely helpful to the explorers, Louis and Clark, on their expedition to the Pacific ...
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Can a sentence start with “Because”?

In my grade school days, I recall a teacher proclaiming to the class: You should never start a sentence with the word "Because". Of course, I've since seen lots of examples to the contrary, and ...