Grammaticality refers to whether something obeys the rules of grammar for English.

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Why areN'T 'not least' and 'notably' interchangeable?

The example is taken from page 1 of this PDF ; The National Admissions Test for Law (LNAT): You may find, however, that answering one question helps you answer the next, not least for the purposes ...
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Grammatical error in the following sentence

"We are completed the work" or "we have completed the work", which one is wrong among these two sentences.
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Optionality of the preposition “at”

I see/hear many instances where the preposition "at" is omitted when a question starts with "What time ... ?" For example, I hear people say "What time are you guys meeting?" as opposed to "What time ...
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Is it wrong to start sentences with “in which case”?

I read a few things someone wrote and for the first time I saw a sentence starting with "in which case". This person does that very frequently, and it seemed really wrong to me. Some time after that ...
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3answers
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“Feel committed to [gerund/infinitive]”

Does "feel committed to" require an infinitive or gerund complement? For example, which of the following is grammatical? I feel committed to following up on that. I feel committed to follow ...
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47 views

do you use a comma when telling/asking people/things? [duplicate]

do you use a comma when telling/asking people/things? For example(s) Do you want to go eat tomorrow, Nathan? Check me out, Nathan. Commas, people, commas! Just sent you a message, Nathan. Just sent ...
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60 views

can we omit the article the in front of 2 musical instruments?

My sentence is : He plays the piano & the violin. Or is it correct to say, he plays the piano & violin?
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59 views

I have a question regarding the proper usage of I and me [duplicate]

Is it "No one will notice but you and me" or "no one will notice but you and I" ?
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72 views

“with” vs “to have”

I have a tendency to say things like: It was nice with cake. Usually it's in the form of: It was adjective with noun. whereas my wife is always correcting me to: It was nice to have ...
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To include vs including

In the hot story of today (the U.S. Senate report on "Enhanced Interrogation Techniques"), I noticed the below: He was subjected to numerous and repeated torture techniques, to include being ...
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Is a thumb also a finger?

The thumb has a different name compared to the other fingers (index, middle, ring, little) and it does not end with "finger". Also, when referring to the hand, I have seen literature where it is ...
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Generic he, correct or incorrect? [duplicate]

Completely ignoring the sexist aspect of the word, is using "he" as a gender neutral pronoun grammatically correct or incorrect? I'm well aware that using "he" may come off as sexist or politically ...
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Usage of “will” after the when clause [on hold]

Which of these sentences is correct / better / more appropriate for the formal style? This is the same as the probability that when taking out two balls we get the same color twice. This is ...
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Add “the” before “of” [migrated]

I am confused with the usage of "the" before an of". City of Pain A City of Sadness Why the first example does not add "a" or "the" before the word "city"? Actually, the first one is a ...
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270 views

Which comes first? Grammar or language? [migrated]

I always have the impression grammar is just a tool to help studying and learning a language, i.e. it is a scientific tool invented for a language after the language has existed. But to think of it ...
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What's the grammar behind “let read”?

Source, para 4 : p 2 of 2, 'Against YA', by Ruth Graham, slate.com Fellow grown-ups, at the risk of sounding snobbish and joyless and old, we are better than this. I know, I know: Live and let ...
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2answers
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How to correctly abbreviate name [closed]

Please advice on how to correctly abbreviate name. Which are grammatically correct? (if there are more correct forms please kindly add them as well) NOTE, If there is no correct way, please point ...
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1answer
75 views

Is there an alternative to “aren't I?” [on hold]

"Aren't I" sounds wrong to say, but as far as I know there are no alternatives. Does anyone have a quick, compact alternative to "aren't I" that sounds more grammatically correct? Thank you so much ...
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36 views

When to use “is” vs. “are”

Joining us in the studio is Secretary of State John Smith and Attorney General Bill Jones. or Joining us in the studio are Secretary of State John Smith and Attorney General Bill Jones. Which is ...
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Please find a word that it is not grammatically correct to begin a sentence or question?

Multiple questions herein ask "Is it grammatically correct to begin a sentence or question with X?" So, I'm definitively asking, are there any words for which it is absolutely not grammatically ...
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When do I use “I” instead of “me?”

From some comments in the answers for common English usage mistakes, there's confusion around the usage of I vs. me: While the sentence, "the other attendees are myself and Steve," is agreed to be ...
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2answers
80 views

Position of the word ‘just’

I was just watching a tv show where they used the following sentence: He probably just hasn't gotten around to it yet It was a reply to the question, “Why didn't he inform you about it?” I want ...
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Is it correct to use “me too” and “I too”?

I'm a bit confused. Is it correct to use "me too" and "I too"? (Also with other pronouns.) For example, if I want to say that Juan gives a present to Ana and I give a present to Ana: Juan gives a ...
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55 views

“So shouldn't you”?

So shouldn't you: is this grammatically correct? Or is you shouldn't either the only appropriate response?
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Can “most of which” be used in the beginning of a sentence? [duplicate]

Just out of curiosity I would like to ask. By searching through the web I could not find an answer yet. Can "most of which" be used in the beginning of a sentence? Here is an example of a sentence ...
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37 views

Why should a copula link two noun phrases of the same case?

http://english.stackexchange.com/a/30392/50720 motivated this question: To quote from the clear explanation: The rule for what [Fowler] and others consider technically right is ... that ...
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(allegedly) ungrammatical preposition stranding

Certain types of preposition-stranding are considered by some linguists to be "ungrammatical" in English, even though they do not seem remotely strange to me (an English speaker). I'm not talking ...
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Why the correct answer is Choice(A), not (C) [closed]

The___of companies that now take orders over their Web sites us remarkable. A. Diversify B. Diverse C. Diversity D. Diversion
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Why use “functional”? [closed]

We need to have a spare copier since the only one that is__(functional)___is on its last leg. A. Functioned B. Functions C. Functional D. Function
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3answers
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I can make it, I will leave. What's the precedence and ambiguity?

Here's a scenario. I am confounded when after a discussion with a friend, they arrive at my place on Saturday, here's the transcript. her: I can make it on Saturday. me: Ok, see you then anytime! ...
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2answers
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Using “disable” as a noun

It seems the noun derived from the verb "disable" is disablement. "Disablement time" or "disablement duration" sounds a little awkward to me though. "Disable time" sounds better, and also gives much ...
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Is there a word “lazies”?

I see many usages of this word in google (http://www.google.com/search?q=lazies), but I can't find its definition. What does it mean? Is it proper to use it in the following sentence: This book ...
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Is it correct to say “It was not happened”?

Is it correct to say "It was not happened"? I have heard people saying "It was not happening" or "It didn't happen" but "It was not happened" is new to me.
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Correct usage of supersede?

I am looking up automotive parts for my car, and I come across this phrase in the description for part X: Pending supersession to Y. Does mean that X is being replaced by Y, or is Y replacing X. ...
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Is this grammatically correct? [closed]

John Appleseed, an old family friend. He has influenced my life in so many ways. One of them being where I would like to go in life. He has inspired me into becoming a teacher and pushing me to work ...
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'no matter in which way' or 'no matter which way?

Is in necessary in the phrase: It is the same, no matter in which way it is done. That is, is it acceptable to write: It is the same, no matter which way it is done.
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Is this sentence right? (Among the first signs that…)

Among the first signs that patriotic propaganda was losing its effectiveness came in 2009, when Apple launched the iPhone in South Korea. (from ...
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When should I use “a” versus “an” in front of a word beginning with the letter h?

A basic grammar rule is to use an instead of a before a vowel sound. Given that historic is not pronounced with a silent h, I use “a historic”. Is this correct? What about heroic? Should be “It was a ...
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Is it correct to say “tell it right”? [closed]

Could you advise if the phrase "tell sth. right" is correct grammatically?
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Is “everyone is selfish” correct or “everyone are selfish”? [duplicate]

Everyone is selfish seems to sound right for me although it seems to look wrong.I wanted to know what is the right usage.
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conjunction-reduction in the sentence

My work ethic together with belief in my ability has led to progress. Can linking phrases with together with/combined with/along with/as-well-as be seen as using conjunction-reduction so that the ...
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Help with this question

Please let me know if there are any grammatical mistakes in this sentence: "However,feel free to send me a follow request,If I like what your site is about,I'll follow you instead." Is there supposed ...
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Is this an example of a dangling modifier?

Dangling modifiers occur when it is unclear to which word a descriptive part of sentence applies. A classic example would be "She left the room fuming" -- is it "she" or the room that's fuming? But ...
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“Almost until 1900” or “until almost 1900”: which one is correct?

Although various eighteenth- and nineteenth-century American poets had professed an interest in Native American poetry and had pretended to imitate Native American forms in their own works, it was ...
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articles like “the” carrying over using conjunction reduction

Jon had used the scientific approach of his brother and artistic approach of his sister. Would definite article "the" be implicit before "artistic" due to conjunction reduction? Since the phrase ...
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Which is correct: “has died” or “died”?

To me, using Present Perfect form means the event can occur again. So, saying someone has died may not be grammatically correct. Also, I noticed (it might be just coincidence): passed away ...
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2answers
870 views

“My interest in becoming” vs. “my interest to become”

I was writing a letter of application for a university. I wanted to start my letter by writing: I am writing this letter to express my interest in becoming part... and then I got confused. I am ...
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Would you use the word “swum” these days?

Would you use the word "swum" these days? I mean, grammatically, it is the past participle of the verb "to swim", but it seems to me that no one uses it anymore. If it's the case, how would You ...
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When can we omit the subject of a clause?

Is the following sentence correct? Rob is not at school today, but said he would come tomorrow. Notice that the version above does not have a subject before said. Should it be: Rob is not at ...