Grammaticality refers to whether something obeys the rules of grammar for English.

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“And been” when “has” has been said in the sentence already?

I have the sentence "The role has gotten easier and easier to play, and been forced upon me more frequently than not." I was wondering if "and been" is correct to use in this case, or if "has" must be ...
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66 views

Is it possible to say so very and very so?

I know that it is correct to use: Thank you so very much. As much as I know an adverb can be theoretically used to modify another adverb, so my question is: Is it possible to say very so ...
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2answers
45 views

Lack intellectually or Lacking intellectually

I came across a phrase on the internet that seemed wrong (surprise): "[...] especially for those who lack intellectually." In my opinion, this should say "especially for those [who are] lacking ...
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1answer
30 views

“I won't stay longer than I can help” or “longer than I can't help”?

I'm a non-native speaker of English and the following sentence makes me wonder: "I won't stay longer than I can help." I've heard similar uses of "can help" in other contexts and they all ...
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20 views

Is it third person singular or plural? [duplicate]

Do I need to add a suffix -s to the verbs in the following cases? Her academic background combined with her working experience...provideS... Her academic and professional experience.. provideS... I ...
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16k views

Is it rude to say “Thanks for asking”?

My manager recently asked me "How I was doing? Everything Ok?". I felt happy that he asked me that question, and felt that he was really concerned about me. I was doing good. So I told him that and ...
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32 views

Are these default questions about events correct grammatically? [on hold]

As you can see below, I created some default questions which are supposed to ask about events that either have happened or will happen in future(the gaps will be filled by different events such as ...
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26 views

Please check the sentence [on hold]

I can be found interacting with different people on the floor, discussing about their life, ideas, projects and something new they recently learned.
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51 views

Where can I find some default rules to generate WH-questions ( Who, What, Where, Which, When, Why and How )? [on hold]

I have some categories for English words: PERSON - Person ORG - Organization LOC - Location TIME - Time LAW - Law NORP - Nationality GPE - Geopolitical Entity LANGUAGE - Language ...
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101 views

“New York is a great place to live.” (no preposition?)

New York is a great place to live. New York is a great place to live in. I've seen the former usage a lot and I've started wondering what the grammar aspects of it are. The main question ...
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2answers
32 views

Deletions in clauses connected by “and” [on hold]

Can the words in the parentheses be omitted? Accordingly, the camera amount used to simulate one IBEO LUX LiDAR sensor is 11, and (the camera amount used to simulate one ) Velodyne (is) 36.
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33 views

“In my career as” — is “as” correct here?

I have this fragment: ... the experience and knowledge gained will be helpful in my career as a neuropathologist. Is the "as" here okay? It somehow does not sound right to me. Obviously I want ...
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52 views

Is this valid English: “it can help the learner generalize better”?

It sounds a bit off, but I am not sure if it valid or not. It was likely written by a native French speaker. After viewing the comments, I am including the full sentence: It has been shown to ...
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1answer
71 views

Usage of “to find out” [on hold]

Your father climbed to some rough rocks near the coast to find out that under the rocks, our friend Lake lies severely wounded. Is this usage of "to find something by chance (as a result of ...
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1answer
3k views

“Sorry to have kept you waiting” vs. “sorry for having kept you waiting”

Can I transform "I am sorry to have kept you waiting so long" into "I am sorry for having kept you waiting so long"? Is there a difference between them? Additionally, is "I'm sorry having kept you ...
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6answers
3k views

To whoever it may concern

I received a letter of confirmation for funding from an English native speaker. She started the letter with: To whoever it may concern, I am not a native speaker, but that sounds quite odd to me ...
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4answers
63 views

“In” + gerund: “Pip joins the procession in carrying the casket”

Pip joins the funeral procession, planned out by Mr. Trabb, the tailor, in carrying Mrs. Joe’s casket through town. Is this sentence grammatically correct? One of my teachers proofread my work, ...
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1answer
34 views

A is more near to B than C (is or does)? [on hold]

Which of the following sentences is correct? The approximate data values are much closer to the real data values than the original ones are. The approximate data values are much closer to the ...
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1answer
190 views

was or were in Subjunctive Mood [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: “If I was” or “If I were”. Which is more common, and which is correct? Which is correct: “what if there was” or “what if there were”? Which of following sentences is ...
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4answers
748 views

What’s the correct usage of “modulo”?

How would we rephrase the following sentence to be grammatical? : 10 modulo 3 equals 1. By "grammatical", I probably mean something along the lines of standard American English. Initially, I'd ...
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3answers
777 views

Is it wrong to use “never” for a specific time period?

I usually come late to the daily scrum meetings (but I do compensate, by working late!). For the last 6 working days, I have been coming on time, or even slightly earlier. At lunch, I told my ...
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2answers
73 views

“The problem is he is stingy”

I have this sentence: The problem is he is very stingy with his money. But I feel it sounds weird or even wrong with the two ises so close. Is the sentence structure grammatical? If it isn't, ...
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1answer
79 views

Had been vs was

Now this is confusing.. I wanna know the difference between the following sentences: -If you were there, I would see you. -If you had been there, I would have seen you. What's the difference ...
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201 views

“My interest in becoming” vs. “my interest to become”

I was writing a letter of application for a university. I wanted to start my letter by writing: I am writing this letter to express my interest in becoming part... and then I got confused. I am ...
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2answers
58 views

Should the verb phrases following “either” and “or” in an “either/or” sentence have the same structure?

Should the verb phrases following either and or in an "either or" sentence have the same structure? For example, is the following sentence correct? The coordinates of the points are either ...
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4answers
439 views

“I never went to poker yesterday” - Is this grammatically correct? [duplicate]

A colleague of mine often pulls me up on my awful grammar, earlier today I said "I never went to poker yesterday" and she told me that it was grammatically incorrect. I understand that I ...
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4k views

Controversy over verb choice in “neither you nor I {is/am/are} in control”

I was watching the film A Game of Shadows starring Robert Downey Junior and Jude law when this line came up, "...neither you nor I is in control..." (I can’t remember the exact words that ended the ...
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62 views

You and Me both

Which is correct: Me and Bob have both reviewed the fees. Bob and I have both reviewed the fees. I ask this because it sounds more grammatically correct to say Me and Bob when using the ...
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1answer
26 views

“All you send me is erased” [closed]

Is the following sentence grammatical? All you send me is erased. A friend of mine always sends me pictures by phone, so I used that phrase as a response to them.
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2k views

Plural of table leaf

In the context of a table leaf, what is the correct plural term, "table leafs" or "table leaves"?
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32 views

I need help with the correct usage of You and Me/I [closed]

when is it right to say "you and me" and "you and I"?
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2answers
1k views

May vs Might in Sentence

On an average Sunday, you might find yourself In the sentence above, the possibility of the person reading finding themselves doing what it says is pretty high. It's almost certain. Should I use ...
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2answers
780 views

Does “then before, now once more” mean anything?

Does the phrase then before, now once more have any meaning in English? Or does it exist just because it rhymes so nicely? Or does it exist at all? Likewise, what about that time then, once again?
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289 views

Is it right to use “both” in negative sentences?

I've just come across a film review by an American author where he says: "I can assure you that both are not typical in any part of this state". In negative sentences like that, my inclination would ...
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42 views

Is 'Apart from by…' grammatically correct

While writing a news report, I found myself phrasing a sentence like this: "Apart from by the managing director, the report would be reviewed by three specially constituted teams." Though I ...
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1answer
2k views

“Your order has shipped”

I ordered a CD from an online music store. My confirmation email reads "your order has shipped." English is not my first language, and this strikes me as odd. Shouldn't it be a passive-voice sentence, ...
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1answer
185 views

“Mistaken as” vs. “mistaken for”

I heard someone use the words mistaken as rather than mistaken for. Is this correct? If it is correct then what is the difference between the two? Is it ever wrong to use mistaken as, and if so, why? ...
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26k views

Are collective nouns always plural, or are certain ones singular?

I'd say Microsoft have a way of bending the rules and I know that McLaren have won the championship. While this sounds strange, I believe it is correct English (sorry, I'm not native). But when it's ...
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5answers
846 views

Why is “herself” required in this particular sentence?

Why is a reflexive pronoun, i.e. herself, grammatically required in the following sentence? I gave Susie a picture of herself. Compare with: I gave Susie a picture of her. This ...
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31 views

Having vs To Have [closed]

So I came across a grammar question that I really had no idea how to answer. The question was to pick the best answer for the blank. The question was A: Did you see Mandy's presentation this morning? ...
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199 views

Omitting “there” in a sentence

Can I omit there in the following question: How much juice is there in the bottle? When is it possible to omit there in a sentence? Any references to grammar sources are welcome and expected. ...
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1answer
131 views

What’s so funny about “You are winner”? [closed]

I came across one slang thing: http://www.urbandictionary.com/define.php?term=You%27re%20Winner! While understand that it is grammatically incorrect and you must say "You are the winner", I don't get ...
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51 views

The bottom graph shows the acceleration profiles, while the top the corresponding speed changes

Are the verb and noun omissions in the following sentence correct? (The words enclosed in parentheses are the omitted ones.) The bottom graph shows the acceleration profiles, while the top (graph) ...
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8k views

Which is correct: “There are not any employees” vs. “there is not any employee”

Sometimes I see two variants of following sentence: "there are not any employees" in the department "there is not any employee" in the department What is the correct sentence?
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52 views

Is it ok to write “Good to see you” in an email or facebook message?

An old friend of mine wrote some greetings to me on facebook. Now if I want to answer his greetings, is it ok to write: "Hi, Jhon, good to see you again"? Because I don't "see" him by e-mail or when ...
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36 views

Something happens because clause A, and clause B.

I wonder whether because can introduce two or even more reasons; if yes, how they are connected. For example, John came late because he woke up late, and his bicycle was broken. Is the sentence ...
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3answers
3k views

Is the usage of “in your humble opinion” correct?

We use "in my humble opinion" to express humility. But I even see usage of "in your humble opinion" to ask for others' opinions. What does it mean? I see the usage in the original message here, ...
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3answers
108 views

“He walks as if he is drunk.” Grammatically correct ? Any difference in meaning from “…as if he were drunk.”?

Is it grammatically correct to use an indicative verb after "as if", or "as though" for that matter? I've heard someone say: "He walks as if he is drunk." Would there have been any difference ...
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1answer
47 views

Much and not much

Why is it that much doesn't fit in many of the places not much does? Compare "Have you got any food in the house?" "Not much." "Would you like this old box?" "That's not much use to me." with ...
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85 views

Is “no other” + comparative grammatically correct?

There is no other harsher critic than yourself. I'm really stumped on this one. The more I read it the less correct it sounds. I think the word harsher is making the sentence sound fairly off ...