Grammaticality refers to whether something obeys the rules of grammar for English.

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Correct usage of “parallel” versus “in parallel” versus “parallelly”

I wish to know if any of the following sentences are incorrect: Using A and B parallel. Using A and B in parallel. Using A and B parallelly. Now I suspect most people are going to ...
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Which one is correct, “best wishes to you” or “best wishes for you”?

Which one is correct, "best wishes to you" or "best wishes for you"?
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Is “Them’s fighting words” a right and received English expression?

I came across the phrase ‘Them’s fighting words,’ in the beginning part of a Time magazine (July 12) article in its Swampland section under the title “Don’t mess with the stimulus! It had all your ...
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“Would have” in conditional clauses

I have been taught to use the if I had form in conditional clauses referring to the past: If the president had asked me, I would have told him the same thing. As far as I can tell though, the ...
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Should you use “who” or “that” when talking about multiple people doing something?

Which of the following is correct? There were 10 people that went to the store. There were 10 people who went to the store. Edit: Which of the following is correct? There were 10 ...
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In reply to “Do they have…”, which is correct — “yes, they do” or “yes, they have”?

My daughter is in an 5th grade English class in Germany with a teacher who teaches British English. The teacher asked what is the correct response to Do they have some? My daughter, who has ...
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What's up with all the words ending with “-eth” in the Bible? [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: What happened to the “-est” and “-eth” verb suffixes in English? How were they once used? With all this rapture thing going on now, I noticed ...
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Should an adverb go before or after a verb?

For example: The word rarely turns up outside of those contexts. The word turns up rarely outside of those contexts. Which one is correct and why?
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Is “all total” grammatically correct?

We have three apples all total. All total, we have 75 bananas. How many cucumbers do we have all total? I have heard many sentences like this. I always wonder, is this grammatically ...
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Is “It won't let me not.” grammatically correct?

I found myself saying the following sentence the other day: I always fasten my seat belt because my car won't let me not — it starts beeping loudly. If I were to use allow instead of let, I ...
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“Well” and “good” as applied to the quality of photographs

These photos came out well. or These photos came out good. According to the proper usage of well and good, the former would be describing the quality of the taking and developing of the ...
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“Compose” and “comprise”

The whole comprises the parts, for example The board comprises five members. and the parts compose the whole such as Five members compose the board. The preceding sentence can be written ...
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Can “so” and “very” be used together?

Is it correct to use so and very together in a single sentence? For example: You are so very funny. Is it grammatically correct or not?
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When is it correct to use the “-wise” suffix?

I found myself writing the following in a bit of technical documentation: The Trainers' and Students' clients have very little in common, both user interface-wise and code-wise. At first, I ...
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“On a lighter note”: what is the meaning of this and how to use it?

If I say: Wow! Diwali party, that sounds great; on the lighter note, who is sponsoring it? Am I correct in using "on the lighter note"? I am using it as saying something funny/witty. Please let ...
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Which is correct: “There are not any employees” vs. “there is not any employee”

Sometimes I see two variants of following sentence: "there are not any employees" in the department "there is not any employee" in the department What is the correct sentence?
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Is this correct: “I'd have to have had…”

This sentence makes my head hurt a bit, and it doesn't seem right, but perhaps you guys could help me sort it out. "If I would've gone to Canada, I'd have to have had some kind of winter gear."
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Is it correct to say “cold temperature”?

Is it correct to say "cold temperature"?
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“all of you” vs “you all”

All of you are sitting here with me in my den vs. You all are sitting here with me in my den And a general form: you all vs. all of you Which is the proper usage?
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Is it correct to say “the 'following' customer”?

It happens all the time. You are in line at the grocery store, Starbucks or anywhere cashiers are employed. Having finished a transaction, one will cheerily offer to help "the following customer." ...
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Is there an exception to the prohibition against ending a sentence with “ ’s ” at work here?

The ’s can be used as a contraction representing a weak, unstressed word that is not pronounced. It allegedly cannot occur in sentence final position. She is not ready, but he is. She’s not ...
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Grammar: “Just because A, doesn't mean B”

I hear this all the time, and often from writers, but it never sounds right. I found myself using it in something I was writing. For example: "Just because I stopped eating doesn't mean I'm full." ...
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Is it correct to say “one out of *a* possible four”?

I am curious if it is correct to say "one out of a possible four". This is what I found in a publication: Discrete level (one out of a possible four), corresponding to a range of safety ...
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Is it correct to use “uppercased”?

Is uppercase a valid verb? Could I say for example "you should use your password uppercased"?
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Usage of “we” as plural second-person

I often hear people saying phrases of the type "How are we doing over here?" by servers at restaurants, for example. Obviously they mean "How are you (plural) doing?" Where does this type of usage ...
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“Congratulate for” vs. “congratulate on”

Which is correct? I congratulated him for coming first in the race. I congratulated him on coming first in the race.
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“Any” with countable nouns in questions

I have seen "is “any” also used with plurals", which explains that any can be used with singular, plural, and uncountable nouns. However, I want to ask specifically about questions. ...
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“How big of a problem” vs. “how big a problem”

Quite a few phrases in English are constructed like so: How [adjective] a [noun]...? This is the question form of the construction, which is often answered with the negative: Not that ...
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Definite article with proper nouns, titles followed by a common noun

Over time I developed this rule where if a title or a proper name is followed by a common noun that represents the class of the entity I am referring to, then I use the definite article. In Example 1, ...
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Why do I so often want to replace “happen” in sentences?

Consider the following variant sentences: Colloquia and seminars both happen in an academic setting. and Colloquia and seminars both occur in an academic setting. Using happen to describe ...
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“Had better” — what is the meaning of this grammatically?

I'm interested to know why we use had better for recommendation. Technically we're speaking of an action that hasn't yet occurred. Like he had better leave a tip means he hasn't yet left a tip, but I ...
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Is a thumb also a finger?

The thumb has a different name compared to the other fingers (index, middle, ring, little) and it does not end with "finger". Also, when referring to the hand, I have seen literature where it is ...
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Which is correct: “with regards to,” “in regards with,” “regarding”?

I have been using the following phrases but I am still not confident that they are grammatically correct and sound right: "in regards with something" "with regards to something" "regarding ...
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“How to […]?” and “Where to […]?” Questions that are not questions. Is this defensible?

Adding a question mark to the end of a "How to" or "Where to" sentence appears to be quite common. Here are two examples from this very site: How to punctuate a list of questions? (link) Where to ...
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Do two people have “breaths”?

In some books, I see the use of the word "breaths" in the phrase "they held their breaths". Is this correct? And if it is, should I go by the Ngram (below) in spite of grammaticality? Or are both ...
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“As part of” versus “as a part of”

When should I use "as part of", and when "as a part of"?
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Mathematical symbol as simple predicate

I am translating a paper about a general physics question. I am not very familiar with physics other than the historical perspective and I am requesting some help with the grammar. I have a sentence ...
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The use of “exact same”

My English teacher feels very strongly that exact same is redundant and therefore incorrect. I disagree with her. She feels that exact should be used in place of exact same, but I have rarely heard ...
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Which one is correct “You heard it correct” or “You heard it correctly”?

Which one is correct? You heard it correct or You heard it correctly Does the same apply to read it correct[ly]?
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Starting sentence with “indeed” to complete previous statement

Is it correct to add a sentence that starts with indeed in order to complete a previous statement? For example, The political crisis has a negative influence on the economy. Indeed, foreign ...
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Is “very less” correct English?

Is using very less correct English? My friend suggests it should be very little. Are they both correct, or is there a difference?
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Is it incorrect to say, 'Give me it'?

Is it incorrect to say, 'Give me it' ? I am told that it is and one should always say, 'Give it me'?
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“He didn't know where New Jersey was”

I know the past tense carries the past tense in every dependent clause, but referring specifically to places or to things that are eternal, like the Earth, seems a bit weird and therefore we sometimes ...
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Using a question mark mid-sentence

May I use a question mark in the middle of a sentence? Examples: Would you like the drapes to be white? or perhaps something off-white? Would you like the logo to be centered? at the bottom? ...
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Analysis of “It is like a dream come true”

I've been unable to grammatically analyse the sentence It is like a dream come true. To me, it should either be It is like a dream that has come true or It is like a dream comes true. ...
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Use of “myself” in business-speak

Occasionally, I will hear or read coworkers using "myself" in place of "me," as in: If you have any questions, you can contact Gimli or myself. I have sent the list to Legolas, Glorfindel, ...
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Why isn't “ecliptic” a proper noun?

Why isn't ecliptic a proper noun? There is only one, and it has a name. Example (context): ... the true Sun is not always exactly on the ecliptic for a hypothetical observer at Earth's center, ...
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“Alternately” or “alternatively”

What is the difference between alternately and alternatively? I've seen both words being used, but which one is grammatically correct? He could do X. Or alternately, he could do Y. He could do ...
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Is “Many thanks” a proper usage?

I saw emails from English people with Many Thanks as a signing off phrase. Is that proper usage? Or is it a phrase created by continental English speakers due to the influence of their native ...
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Alleged misuse of the word 'respective'

I was told I misused the word respective in the sentence 'If bilingual, please list the respective languages.' My understanding is that the word points to the prior mentioned subjects. Here's a ...