Tagged Questions

Grammaticality refers to whether something obeys the rules of grammar for English.

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3answers
256 views

Is “was always with you” or “had always been with you” grammatically correct?

In those days wherever you went I had always been with you like a shadow. In those days wherever you went I was always with you like a shadow. Which one is grammatically correct?
2
votes
2answers
105 views

Passivity as a passive activity?

I was reading "A fault in our stars" by John Green and he did something rather interesting. The scene is one in which the mother wants her child to attend support group. All the child wants to do is ...
2
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7answers
3k views

… is done in agreement with xxx?

Background: I'm writing a professional (technical) report in which I want to express the following in one simple sentence: The whole report is written based on a certain assumption, except one part ...
4
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2answers
237 views

“I would like that he was normal”; is this sentence correct?

I would like that he was normal. This sounds a little awkward but plausible. Is it valid English? How about another example: I would like that he bathed before going to sleep. It sounds a ...
0
votes
1answer
60 views

I'll get lost tomorrow?

Is the following sentence correct? I'll get lost tomorrow. Mom asked if I have plans of exploring the city alone tomorrow. The city is really new to me and I don't mind if I lost myself ...
0
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1answer
61 views

Why isn't there a verb following can? [closed]

I have read a sentence in America Scientist (May 2014, p45): No longer can skeptical clinicians dismiss the approach as likely to be viable for only a few specific kinds of tumors... Why isn't ...
0
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2answers
78 views

Is it ok to say “mutually practice together”?

Is it correct to say This way we can mutually practice together. Since mutually has already been mentioned, is it correct if I use the word together at the end? It may be redundant, but is ...
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1answer
117 views

Which is the right word to ask if this will create problem on a professional tone

I'm drafting a mail to my team informing them that I'm taking leave on some day and that I want to know if this will create problems or friction in working. I used I’ll will be taking leave on ...
2
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1answer
373 views

“Of which many” vs “many of which” as parenthetical modifiers

The houses on Canal street, of which many had been damaged in the storm, looked abandoned. Is the modifier "of which many... storm" correct? I know that "on canal street" is a prepositional ...
0
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1answer
49 views

Am I using the semicolon correctly in this example? [closed]

When school is over and got nothing to do; wouldn't it be better if you could do something with your friends or family?
3
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1answer
152 views

“Four years are” vs. “four years is” [duplicate]

An exam question is driving me crazy. Find the mistake in the following: Four years are a long time to spend away from family and friends. Literally everyone solved it by replacing are with ...
1
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3answers
109 views

Should we repeat the verb after “rather than”?

Super AMOLED Plus uses a traditional RGB RGB (3 subpixels) arrangement typically used in LCD displays rather than the PenTile RGBG pixel matrix (2 subpixels) used in Super AMOLED. or Super ...
3
votes
1answer
95 views

“I had my house [be] burned down”

I have found out that using the verb be in passive constructions such as: I had my house be burned down is incorrect, therefore it should be I had my house burned down. But is it ...
2
votes
2answers
250 views

Can Neither-Or be used?

My friend was reading the book "The Fault in Our Stars" by John Green and she found what seems to be a grammar mistake. The following sentence is found in the author's note: Neither novels or ...
0
votes
2answers
120 views

English Article [duplicate]

I have come across a sentence where 'Niagara Falls' is used without an article. I seem to remember that there is a basic rule of the English language that there should be an article before any ...
0
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0answers
90 views

looking for appositive that-which phrases

I asked sentences having an appositive that-which phrase like the following sentence in English Language Learners. The insect propagates best near "disturbed land," that which is being cultivated ...
3
votes
1answer
98 views

Usage of “What does who want?”

I have stumbled upon the phrase "What does who want?" which puzzles me. Its unusualness makes me doubt. I have been told it is used just as "What does he want?", with [who] replacing [he] when we ...
0
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2answers
55 views

anything / everything but

With reference to a commonly bad behaviour (e.g. corruption), may I write/say: "it seems to be everything but an Italian bad habit only!"?
0
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2answers
63 views

Use of the word Refrained

'The experience of negative emotions in the flow of life can never be stopped, only refrained!' Is this sentence grammatically wrong since the preposition 'from' does not follow the word refrained?
2
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4answers
81 views

“Looks more genuine than me/I writing”

In the following sentence, which is more appropriate — I or me, and why? Sending separate mails will look more genuine than me/I writing on behalf of everyone.
2
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3answers
204 views

Could the sentence “Not even death can do us part” be considered correct?

Not even death can do us part. These are lyrics from the Beyoncé song "Sweet Dreams" (link to the part in question.) I've been curious about this for a while. If one considers "Till death do us ...
1
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1answer
190 views

What is wrong with the phrase “me and my work”?

For my thesis, in my acknowledgements, I have the following line: I would like to thank my fiancé, ----, who has endlessly supported me and my work. My supervisor highlighted me and my work and ...
2
votes
2answers
1k views

The use of “who has” or “who have” in a sentence [duplicate]

Consider the following example: It is you who has taken the garbage out. It is you who have taken the garbage out. Does one use "has" or "have" in this sentence construction? Which of ...
1
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1answer
41 views

Was conversing or conversed

Should it be: 1: As I was conversing with him about his love for jazz, I measured the temperature and found it to be 100 degrees. 2: As I conversed with him about his love for jazz, I measured the ...
2
votes
1answer
67 views

which is better, that that or that [duplicate]

Which is better, "Bob knows that that is wrong" or "Bob knows that is wrong"? It seems to me that the first "that" is acting as the relation between Bob and the thing that is wrong, while the second ...
0
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1answer
66 views

Punctuation to ensure that both objects are meant

In addition, a weak interaction between light and matter in free space renders the observation of many QED e ffects, like e.g. quadrature squeezing [3] or the phase shift [4{7] of a single ...
3
votes
2answers
145 views

Why does this sentence seem to me to have an adverb for a subject? [closed]

At the bottom of the device is a microphone and a microUSB port for data connections and charging (Source) At the bottom of the device is an adverb of place. Why is the subject of the sentence an ...
0
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4answers
94 views

I need another phrase to replace “to be a part of helping the program grow.” [closed]

I have great passion and love for the Music Program and would love to continue to be a part of helping the program grow.
1
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1answer
47 views

Slightly chance of something

On multiple occasions I heard the phrase slightly chance of something (e.g. rain). This sounds wrong as slightly is an adverb. Googling returns only few instances. Is it acceptable to use this in ...
0
votes
1answer
54 views

Usage of 'will' twice in a sentence

Is the sentence 'The student who will score the maximum marks will win a prize' correct?
1
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1answer
65 views

A or An in “a (relatively) obscure meaning”?

I've just come across this sentence here at "english.stackexchange.com". "The writer should have taken care not to hide such a (relatively) obscure meaning underneath an obviously silly one." ...
4
votes
2answers
271 views

Why (so) sure? vs How (so) sure?

I just answered a question on ELL.SE that made me (and the OP) wonder about something... Consider the following four question responses to these two statements: 1- "I know I'll marry young." ...
1
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1answer
44 views

Outward vs Out-swing door

I am curious what the proper use of language is when your talking about doors. Should a door that swings out be called "Out-swing door" or "Outward swing door"? I'm not sure if there is a proper use ...
0
votes
1answer
36 views

Is “and with” grammatical in this sentence?

We have registered nurses working on site with a nutritional background to provide weight loss advice to clients and with at least a 2 year working experience. Is the part in bold grammatical?
1
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2answers
148 views

The clock (has kept/kept) precise time for over forty years? [closed]

The correct answer is "kept" but I don't understand why because shouldn't "over forty years" make it past progressive? This is from an ACT practice test. The passage talks about a guy making the ...
2
votes
3answers
150 views

Why is this sentence correct?

Why is this sentence correct? The old, discredited leaders of the Party had been used to gather there before they were finally purged. The "had been used to" part troubles me. Shouldn't it be ...
-2
votes
1answer
57 views

What to use : “that” or “who”? [duplicate]

Consider this sentence : "I was going down the hill and on my step down I saw a guy who appeared to be disguised". "I was going down the hill and on my step down I saw a guy that appeared to be ...
5
votes
2answers
380 views

Can “mode” be used as “mean” and “median” are?

It'd be normal to hear sentences like these: The mean ticket price for the concert was $56.50. The median ticket price for the concert was $61. But what about: The mode ticket price for ...
1
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2answers
177 views

Question about grammatical name and its function

What is the grammatical name given to, and the function of, the part of the sentence below in bold? Maneuvring a tanker is likewise a daunting challenge.
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0answers
35 views

Be talking something? [closed]

First of all, I'm not native. I've heard this expression in some movies, I believe, and I'm wondering whether it's correct (or maybe I just thought I heard this and I'm mistaken). Can you say "be ...
0
votes
4answers
446 views

Late Night vs Early Morning [duplicate]

Can anyone explain me Difference between late night & early morning ? "I slept early morning".Is this sentence correct ? What time is called morning ? After 12:00 AM ?
1
vote
3answers
77 views

“Let A be a set, [let] B [be] a group”

Math proves often start with "let". For example: Let A be a set. This is easy. But what about introducing several things in that manner? Let A be a set, B be a group, and C be a number. ...
0
votes
2answers
621 views

“As” vs “because of” [closed]

I am a little bit confused in meaning of "as" and "because of". there are two sentences: I felt tired today as I worked hard yesterday. I felt tired because of I worked hard yesterday or I felt ...
3
votes
1answer
141 views

“A mice problem” vs. “a mouse problem”

My friend said to me one day: "We have a mice problem at UNI". Is "a mice problem" grammatical as opposed to "a mouse problem"?
1
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2answers
98 views

“More” used in front of “happy” [duplicate]

Is it ever wrong to use the word "more" in front of an adjective? For example, is the following sentence grammatically incorrect: "I am more happy when I am reading poetry"?
1
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0answers
103 views

Is it an understandable sentence? [closed]

Throughout the paper, we suppose that a,b,c and d are fixed and we will not write them when they appear as indices in the notations to make the notations more readable.
3
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4answers
169 views

I can't not be pregnant

This is a quote from a Gwyneth Paltrow interview where she talks about her miscarriage: "It was awful," she told the Daily Mail's You magazine. "It happened really late, and I wasn't expecting it ...
2
votes
2answers
195 views

Grammaticality of “the” in “I am going to the Asda later”

A friend of mine and I are having a long standing debate about the correctness of a sentence. Informing me what he was doing later that day he said: I am going to the Asda later. Note: To ...
3
votes
4answers
397 views

Can I put the question word “where” at the end of a question? [closed]

I got this sentence from a Primary 5 student's worksheet. According to this passage, this creature can be found where? Some of the parents think that the sentence should be "..., where can ...
0
votes
4answers
210 views

Position of “yet” in a causative sentence

If I have to write a causative sentence in Present Perfect, where should I put yet, at the end of the question or right after the negation? She hasn't had her doors mended by the carpenter yet. ...