Grammaticality refers to whether something obeys the rules of grammar for English.

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Article (the) with relative clauses

I am not confident about my judgement as to whether or not "the" is required if a relative clause is used in a sentence. For example, The data can be collected on all the computers on which the ...
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214 views

is “Younger Generation” plural or singular

Is this sentence correct? I recently read it in an article: "How does younger generation spend their money." I want to know whether the usage of "their" in the above is correct
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88 views

“This cake, what is my favorite, makes me happy”

Lately I have heard many people using what in place of which in adjectival phrases: This cake, what is my favorite, makes me happy. This cake, which is my favorite, makes me happy. Is ...
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181 views

“Fall from” vs. “fall off”

Which of the following sentences is correct? She fell from the bike. She fell off the bike.
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380 views

Change subject after “in doing so”

I was recently told in class that this sentence is correct: "He reprogrammed the system, and in doing so, we lost crucial data." It just doesn't feel right to me - my intuition is that the subject ...
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1answer
1k views

Plural of table leaf

In the context of a table leaf, what is the correct plural term, "table leafs" or "table leaves"?
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50 views

Is the adjectival form “to be concatenated” correct?

I have the following sentence: Fetch the transformations which need to be concatenated. Is the following adjectival form of which need to be concatenated correct? Fetch the to be ...
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1answer
50 views

“of the three” vs “of all three”

If we make a sentence comparing the age of three people, we can say "A is the oldest of the three." At that time, would it be possible to say, "A is the oldest of all three." Is the sentence ...
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1answer
299 views

“I used” or I've used"?

Which is the correct way of saying the following sentence (if there is a "right" way) I used different symbols to make it great. I've used deifferent symbols to make it great.
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1answer
505 views

“Take on responsibility” vs. “take up responsibilty”

I now have to take _ additional responsibility. Are both on and up grammatically correct? Is there a difference in meaning? When to use which one?
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62 views

Can “somethings” be used as a plural?

I heard the soft thumps of somethings heavy on cloth. This looks wrong, but changing it to singular makes it work. I heard the soft thump of something heavy on cloth. I want to keep the ...
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2answers
116 views

Is “Studying will help me with achieving my dreams” grammatical?

I need to take sentences out of a transcript, so I can’t change the structure of this particular sentence. I can either use it in my work as a grammatically correct sentence, or I can't. I just ...
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131 views

Imperative of 'to lie'. [duplicate]

At our regular supermarket this morning I noticed that they have put stickers on the check-out conveyor which say 'Lay bottles this way' with an arrow indicating that they want them parallel with the ...
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128 views

is it correct to say “though” in this context

I want to ask my manager something. i tried this I have some questions, though I do know that I have asked you a lot and I am so sorry for losing your time. is though correct in this context?
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36 views

In “set of reasons that” what does *that* modify?

Suppose that there is a survey of people asking them their reasons for thinking or behaving a certain way. While analyzing the survey results, a researcher may discuss all the different reasons the ...
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1answer
69 views

Which one is it all-time or all time? [duplicate]

all time or all-time, not sure which one it is. Are they different in different scenarios?
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2answers
127 views

Thanks be to you, John

Is "Thanks, John." a short form for "Thanks be to you, John."? Is "Thanks, John." a sentence?
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2answers
239 views

How to use namely correct

Is this a correct use of namely: We will investigate two different research questions: 1. Is there a correlation between age and income? 2. Does university education lead to higher income? ...
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5k views

Was I driving more than 5 mph under the speed limit, or less than 5 mph under the speed limit?

Suppose I am driving 38 miles per hour in a 45 zone. This, of course, is seven miles per hour under the speed limit. Of course, I am driving this slowly because the road is wet, and safe driving ...
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1answer
204 views

“Can” or “could”, which is grammatically correct?

I'm a call center agent. When I ask to transfer the call to the authorized person, which form should I use: Can I speak to...? or Could I speak to...?
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56 views

Valid to use “more conceptually” at the beginning of a sentence?

Suppose I have the following two sentences... The equation can be expressed in terms of the (insert complex but slightly conceptual gibberish here). More conceptually, the heavy cow moves slower ...
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85 views

“As far as job is concerned, marriage is no longer an obstacle.” Is this a grammatically correct and meaningful sentence?

There was a question in a book: Do women in your country work after they get married? Does "As far as job is concerned, marriage is no longer an obstacle." mean that having a job is no ...
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2answers
53 views

Correct Use of “Resort to”

Are "resort to" or "resorted to" (phrasal verbs followed by a preposition) always negative? For example, is it always incorrect to write any of the following sentences, or are there circumstances ...
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2answers
682 views

Is it ever acceptable to use “but” after a period/full stop [duplicate]

View the following text as a generic example, disregarding issues of context, etc. Stir constantly as the mixture begins to boil, watching the temperature regularly as the contents begins to ...
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2answers
1k views

Is this sentence grammatical and punctuated correctly?

Does this sentence need to be broken up by a semi colon, conjuction, or a period? Is there a modifier error here as well? The peasants were the least free of all people, bound by tradition and ...
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1answer
251 views

Is it right to use “both” in negative sentences?

I've just come across a film review by an American author where he says: "I can assure you that both are not typical in any part of this state". In negative sentences like that, my inclination would ...
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2answers
112 views

Is the sentence “We are invested” correct?

Is the sentence "We are invested" correct? I found it in a blog and was wondering whether it is correct. I do not want to discuss the usage, but just if the combination of "are" + "invested" is ...
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136 views

Unnecessary pronouns: “The President he issued…”

Is it now considered acceptable to follow a proper noun with a pronoun? E.g. The President he issued a new executive order.
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0answers
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Resources on writing grammatically and clearly [duplicate]

The first part of this question is about how I should ask this question. I am a bit confused about all the terms used to describe books written about English. For example, "usage", "style", ...
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1answer
475 views

Nationalities - When do we use the singular or plural form

I always have doubts whether to use a singular or a plural noun when I refer to certain peoples. For example, we say Americans, Italians, Brazilians, Russians and Austrians. But we say The British, ...
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1answer
2k views

“Sorry to have kept you waiting” vs. “sorry for having kept you waiting”

Can I transform "I am sorry to have kept you waiting so long" into "I am sorry for having kept you waiting so long"? Is there a difference between them? Additionally, is "I'm sorry having kept you ...
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1answer
60 views

“If the robot can learn from a human, it can/could keep track of humans.”

I have the following sentence and I don't know whether "can" or "could" would be a better choice. If the robot can learn from a human, it could keep track of humans. If the robot can learn ...
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2answers
117 views

Usage of two hads in a sentence, not continuously

Is the second sentence correct? Are we going ahead with this now? Earlier, you had told me that they had quoted a huge fee the last time we asked. Or should it rather just be "You told me that ...
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1answer
95 views

Which verb is used for the word “activity” - “do” or “play”?

In an English test I had recently, there was this multiple choice question: There were lots of different activities for Jay to ... there. A - Make B - Do C - Play There was no extra ...
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50 views

“Huge potential profit” vs. “huge profit potential”

What is the proper usage — "huge potential profit" or "huge profit potential"?
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205 views

Usage of the word “ascetic”

Is the sentence "You have to be ascetic about eating junk food" correct? Ascetic: Practicing severe self-denial
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78 views

Naming a chat group with The Lee or Lee's

I want to start a WhatsApp group and I don't know which of the following names is grammatically correct: Lee Family The Lee Family Lee's Family The Lee's Family.
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6answers
497 views

“It's not raining today, isn't it?” vs. “it's not raining today, is it?” [duplicate]

Which is correct: It's not raining today, isn't it? It's not raining today, is it?
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0answers
151 views

“Order something done” for “Order something to be done” [duplicate]

As far as your variety of English goes, can the verbal turn "order something done" be used interchangeably with "order something to be done"? "We ordered this item sent to our local store." ...
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0answers
162 views

Can't , can not and cannot [closed]

Can't, can not and cannot is a bit confusing. I know that can't and can not are both grammatically correct. Is cannot a real word? Is it grammatically correct? Should it be written as one word or ...
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3answers
147 views

there is a lot or there are a lot? over here or at here? [duplicate]

I am an English learner. While I was watching a documentary video, this caption really confused me a lot. Is it correct to say there is a lot? I thought it is supposed to be there are a lot. Also, ...
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1answer
70 views

“more leads mean more sales” or “more leads means more sales”?

I was just wondering which one is grammatically correct. "more leads mean more sales" OR "more leads means more sales" Of course, "more leads" is plural, but the sentence implies ...
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91 views

A question on narration in the past

This is a bit of a complicated question. The context is that someone gave advice to someone else. The whole situation is narrated in the past. I fear that by using the past tense, the reader may ...
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2answers
144 views

Sentence structure for grammar: parallel vs. what feels natural

Are the following both grammatically correct, or is one incorrect and why? (Usage context: book, not an essay). Original: He erases whatever he wills, and fixes. With him is the original record. ...
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3answers
269 views

What is the proper grammatical sentence structure for this Subject, Verb, Object?

A card game has a card with the following text: Each other player destroys his or her minion with the least power (owner chooses in case of ties). Am I correct in believing that the Subject, ...
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2answers
144 views

Is this correct English or is it slang from a particular region?

Is it correct to ask "Are you in area?" when you are asking if someone is from that city or township?
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4answers
1k views

Can someone please tell me which of the two sentences is correct?

Here are the two sentences. This was the fastest I heard someone responded. This was the fastest I heard someone respond. Can someone help me understand: A) Which one is correct, and what is ...
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2answers
315 views

Which is more grammatically correct - “performance in” or “performance on”?

Which of the following is more grammatically correct? a. John's performance on the test shocked the teacher. (or) b. John's performance in the test shocked the teacher.
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2answers
65 views

The use of numbers in time periods

Why do we say "10 minutes or less" rather than "10 minutes or fewer?"
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2answers
75 views

“Has Bluetooth Enabled” or “Is Bluetooth Enabled”

Having a debate at work... Current headline reads "Product-X Has Bluetooth Enabled". Does that make sense? Or should it be "Product X Is Bluetooth Enabled"?