Grammaticality refers to whether something obeys the rules of grammar in English. If your question is about grammar itself, please use the "grammar" tag.

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Which is the correct passive construction of 'she bore him on the Christmas day'?

I think I understand the difference of meaning between 'born' and 'borne', plus I have also checked out a few questions that were asked about the two terms on this forum. So, I hope I am not posting a ...
13
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1answer
505 views

“All your commas are belong to Array” and similar — is this grammar form “proper”?

I've often come across "weird" sentences like, say, instead of: All of your commas belong to Array. It writes: All your commas are belong to Array. It's not just once or twice, I actually ...
10
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4answers
32k views

When should we use “and” and/or “and/or”?

What's the difference between "and" and "and/or"? How do we decide whether to use one or the other? Note: Also it would be great if someone could explain how do we actually pronounce "and/or" ...
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5answers
7k views

“Till death do us part”

Every time I see this expression, I can't help thinking it's grammatically wrong. Is it grammatically acceptable? Why is it used extensively in this form?
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3answers
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Can I use the “ll” contraction with proper names?

Can I contract "will" as "ll" when preceded by a proper name? For example: John will visit you tomorrow John'll visit you tomorrow I am inclined to think this is not acceptable in standard ...
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2answers
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Inversion in “Only when the virus introduces its nucleic acid into a cell does disease occur”

Given this sentence, Disease occurs only when the virus introduces its nucleic acid into a cell. Is the following inversion grammatical? → Only when the virus introduces its nucleic acid ...
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4answers
30k views

To whoever it may concern

I received a letter of confirmation for funding from an English native speaker. She started the letter with: To whoever it may concern, I am not a native speaker, but that sounds quite odd to me ...
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4answers
1k views

Definite article before scientific terms

I'm writing up my dissertation and I'm really confused where to use "the". Examples: In this experiment, (the?) heat transfer coefficient was calculated, allowing to estimate (the?)frost thickness....
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2answers
10k views

A study of awake and awaken

It has been drawn to my attention that I may not be using the verb 'awake'correctly in the active and passive. Please could someone confirm that I have now got this right. In their simple present ...
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2answers
723 views

Tense agreement in conditional statements: “I could do whatever I want” vs. “I could do whatever I wanted”

Consider the following sentences: If I had my own place, I could do whatever I want. If I had my own place, I could do whatever I wanted. She said I could do whatever I want. She ...
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3answers
16k views

Difference between “did + verb” and just “verb+ed”

This is something I always get confuse with (native language German). As far as I know "did + verb" is something done and finished in the past. But isn't it the same with "verb + ed"?
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2answers
758 views

“Julio and I” vs “I and Julio” [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: “My friends and I” vs. “My friends and me” vs. “Me and my friends” Is naming the first person last proper grammar or just proper manners? "Julio and I went to the ...
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1answer
2k views

Nationalities - When do we use the singular or plural form

I always have doubts whether to use a singular or a plural noun when I refer to certain peoples. For example, we say Americans, Italians, Brazilians, Russians and Austrians. But we say The British, ...
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2answers
37k views

Which is correct: “when you have finished” or “when you will finish”?

From an English test on Facebook: When you have finished to move the furniture, let me know. or When you will finish moving the furniture, let me know. I think the correct one is the ...
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votes
2answers
938 views

Position of verb for object clause

Is the general word order of this sentence correct? We investigate how strong the effect of X on Y is. Or, as an alternative, We investigate how strong the effect of X is on Y. In a ...
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1answer
16k views

Correct use of “is” or “are” [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: Singular or plural following a list Would I use is or are in the following sentence? The Pohutakawa Coast, Hauraki Gulf, and Waiheke Island is/are the backdrop for our ...
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8answers
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Is it correct that “etc.” can not be used together in a sentence with “for example” and “such as”?

I just read an article from a Chinese website for English teaching which mentions that point. For instance, one can't say: "I can play quite a few musical instruments, for example, the flute, the ...
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5answers
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Can a noun (such as “duct tape”) be used as a verb?

I found the phrase “duct-tape together” in the following sentence of a Washington Post (June 21) article written by Chris Cillizza under the title “Gingrich campaign hit by more departures.” The ...
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2answers
50k views

Which phrase is correct: “dependent on” or “dependent upon”

Which sentence is correct?  my project is dependent upon your project completing my project is dependent on your project completing.
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3answers
53k views

“Next Friday” vs. “This Friday” [duplicate]

Duplicate: What day is next Tuesday? I have always considered next Friday to be not this coming Friday, but the one after. This Friday is the Friday at the end of this week. I have a Canadian ...
9
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4answers
381 views

Is “has or will read” grammatical?

I just wrote [he] has or will read [some text] in an ELL chat room. But looking at it (or more accurately, listening to my "inner voice" trying to "read it aloud"), I find it bothers me a lot. A ...
8
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4answers
8k views

Is “breaths” grammatically correct?

In some books, I see the use of the word "breaths" in the phrase "they held their breaths". Is this correct? And if it is, should I go by the Ngram (below) in spite of grammaticality? Or are both ...
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4answers
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Usage of apostrophe in “baker’s dozen”

In the phrase “baker’s dozen”, why does the apostrophe indicate possession of a (single) baker? Shouldn't it indicate possession of all bakers in general? Shouldn’t it be “bakers’ dozen”?
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3answers
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“Nobody will help you but me” vs. “Nobody will help you but I”

As has been shown in another question, in comparisons with than both the accusative and the nominative are possible and grammatical: He loves you more than I. He loves you more than me. ...
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3answers
2k views

“How much is/are the two fares?”

Which is correct? How much is the two fares? How much are the two fares?
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1answer
1k views

Is it acceptable to omit “I” when it's the subject? [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: Is it acceptable to begin a declarative sentence with “Am”? Is it correct English to omit I from the beginning of a sentence when it's clearly implied? For example... ...
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3answers
166 views

Can anyone tell me the name of these sentences?

I am a chinese student and one of my friend, a chinese, wrote sentences like this: Just a little above me, he was fighting with all his might. On the summit of the mountain, he cried with joy. He ...
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2answers
2k views

“In a list” vs. “on a list”

In the following sentence, should I use in or on? If I ever make a list, not only will you be in/on it, you'll top it, too.
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3answers
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About using “only” with present perfect

I have seen this sentence in a status from one of my facebook friends. It doesn't sound right to me. We have only left the city for the day. I think that it should be something like: We have ...
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2answers
2k views

“Change their positions” vs. “change their position” [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: “Those who qualify will be awarded a certificate” or “those who qualify will be awarded certificates”? “On their back” or “on their ...
3
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2answers
4k views

May vs Might in Sentence [duplicate]

On an average Sunday, you might find yourself In the sentence above, the possibility of the person reading finding themselves doing what it says is pretty high. It's almost certain. Should I use may ...
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3answers
6k views

“You was trouble”?

guess some of you know the song "Grenade" from Bruno Mars, one of the lines is: Should've known you was trouble from the first kiss English isn't my mother tongue, but "was trouble" just sounds ...
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2answers
1k views

Can “advise” be used with the definition of “advice”? [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: “Advise” vs “advice” I've seen twice in in 30 minutes how someone had said that they wanted advise on [...] subject, or how they needed advise on [.....
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3answers
254 views

Precedence of “and” and “or”

Do and and or have any particular precedence as they do in programming languages? What does the following sentence mean? Will it be cold and rain or snow today? Will it (be cold and ...
2
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3answers
6k views

Using 'very' with a noun

Are these correct ways to use very with a noun? She is the very girl I want. On the very year of 2012, comes the end of the world. This is the very company everyone wants to work for. ...
2
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3answers
70k views

Which is correct: “is solved” or “has been solved”?

In a technical environment, what is the most suitable sentence to use when answering to someone about a problem that they had and we solved it for them: The problem is solved The problem has been ...
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1answer
14k views

“Position in/at/for your company”

Which is correct? I am writing to apply for the position of ____ in your company. I am writinng to apply for the position of ____ at your company. I am writinng to apply for the position ...
2
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1answer
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Use of “only” and word-order

I'm writing an automobile website and some of my paragraphs contain the word "only". I understand the following. As far as I'm aware, this is right: Only the Volkswagen Polo, Golf, Passat, Passat ...
2
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1answer
2k views

Usage of “whose” not referring to a person [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: Referring to some attribute of an inanimate object — use “who's”? I noticed the use of "whose" in the following sentence I wrote does not refer to a person: ...
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5answers
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“Put it into the refrigerator” or “Put it in the refrigerator”? [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: When should “into” be used rather than “in to,” and vice versa? I am sorry if the question is silly, but I think I heard both options spoken by ...
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0answers
185 views

Possessive “that's” [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: 'Which', 'whose' or something else? Is the use of "that's" correct in the sentence below? Imagine a frame with two sets of strings stretched across, ...
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6answers
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“Arnold raced out of the door”: grammatical or not?

Arnold raced out of the door, and started... In its time, it was once reported, this was one of the most often-read lines of fiction in the English language: it is the sentence fragment shown in a ...
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5answers
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Is it correct to say “it is forty-five past nine”?

I had a quiz and I failed because I wrote that 9.45 was "forty-five past nine" instead of "quarter to ten". I think it should have been accepted by my teacher. I searched the Internet and I found the ...
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2answers
10k views

“Where am I?” vs. “Where I am?” [closed]

Which is more correct to say in a question? (For example a guy that wakes up in a train) "Where am I?" or "Where I am?"
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2answers
840 views

Should a photograph label read “you and I” or “you and me”? [duplicate]

I had a debate with my friend about this topic because he had a photo captioned: Seth and I playing lion king and I said it should be Seth and me playing lion king Which is correct?
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1answer
584 views

Imperative of 'to lie'. [duplicate]

At our regular supermarket this morning I noticed that they have put stickers on the check-out conveyor which say 'Lay bottles this way' with an arrow indicating that they want them parallel with the ...
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3answers
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“By the bus” or “on the bus”

Is it more correct to form a sentence such as John went to academic conference by the bus using by as the preposition indicating what he took to the conference, or is using on the correct way? ...
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Usage of “rather than to”

I don't know if "rather than to" is correct or if there is a better turn of phrase: Note that our aim is to show [...] rather than to run [...]
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1answer
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Which of the following sentences is/are incorrect? (“Permit” vs. “allow” vs. “let”)

Which of the following sentences is/are incorrect? Why? The visa permits you to study for two months. My father would never allow me to study English Let me to go. You're hurting me. This is ...
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1answer
447 views

That's a lot of ___ vs. those are a lot of ___

That's a lot of cars! Those are a lot of cars! The context is when a someone sees many objects (in this example, cars) and makes the exclamation. According to this site, lot can handle either ...