Grammaticality refers to whether something obeys the rules of grammar in English. If your question is about grammar itself, please use the "grammar" tag.

learn more… | top users | synonyms (3)

0
votes
3answers
12k views

“Too much time has passed.”

Too much time has passed. Is this grammatically correct? Wouldn't it be better to say Too much time has passed by. or Too much time has gone past.
3
votes
6answers
18k views

Does a pedestrian walk 'in' the road, or 'on' the road (both are correct, but which is right?)

Having a bit of a debate about this with some foreign colleagues of mine. I've always used the phrase 'I'm walking in the road', they think that you should say 'I'm walking on the road'.. I'm not ...
0
votes
0answers
36 views

Correct usage of Personal Pronouns [duplicate]

Which of these is the right way of using a personal Pronoun? (Me vs I) This is I. Einstein the Genius! This is Me. Einstein the Genius! I'm a bit confused since both sound right.
0
votes
1answer
89 views

At the end of the day And By the end of the day [closed]

At the end of the day And By the end of the day I am confusing to use this words What is the differents between these words, Could your please some scenario of this two words Thanks
1
vote
1answer
142 views

Is “many a person” singular or plural? [duplicate]

I'm writing a paper and I am not sure how to word this sentence. Which is the correct sentence: I am able to avoid a pitfall into which many a student has fallen. I am able to avoid a pitfall ...
17
votes
8answers
7k views

Is the phrase “for free” correct?

A friend claims that the phrase for free is incorrect. Should we only say at no cost instead?
1
vote
4answers
7k views

Is “a choice between one of two options” grammatically correct?

In: a choice between one of two options I would like to know if this is correct grammatically. I came across it in a scientific paper. I think the “one of ” part should be removed. Am I correct?
8
votes
4answers
466 views

Use of the word “emit”

I came across this article http://www.ibtimes.co.uk/scientists-discovers-light-emiting-mysterious-alien-planet-338945. The web link uses "emitting" in an attributive manner which we have all seen ...
0
votes
2answers
50 views

Into vs. in to question

Which is correct: "Dive right in to why you're involved" or "Dive right into why you're involved" My guess is that the first is correct, since "in" is a part of "dive right in" and should be ...
1
vote
1answer
64 views

Use “will” twice in a sentence [closed]

Is the following sentence correct? "if the user confirmed , the Ticket will be saved and the update will be submitted too (Save and Submit)."
0
votes
0answers
40 views

When do I have license to use the present tense in a *past* narration?

I am narrating a past series of events; of course, all the verbs are in the past tense. One verb, however, signifies an action that will be complete long after (years after) the moment of narration (...
8
votes
4answers
9k views

“My brother or one of my sisters” — singular or plural?

Should I use 'was' or 'were' in this example? I was always delighted when my brother or one of my sisters was/were asked to do them.
0
votes
1answer
124 views

“Because/because of/owing to/on account of/due to”? [closed]

I was doing my homework but I'm stuck on this exercise. The instructions say: Complete these sentences: (my answers are in brackets) “Don’t be fool; the dog’s dancing was … the extremely hot ...
0
votes
0answers
65 views

Is “there's ways” grammatically correct? [duplicate]

I encountered it a few minutes ago as I was reading a webpage and it immediately felt wrong. It seemed obvious at first that it should be "there are ways". I googled it and to my surprise there were ...
1
vote
2answers
8k views

How is the sentence “My mama don't like you, but she likes everyone” correct?

I just heard Love yourself by Justin Bieber. I thought I heard "My mama didn't like you but she likes everyone" from the song. Then later I found lyrics on some websites(listed bellow) but it's not ...
2
votes
4answers
161 views

Can I say : “He was made broke”?

He doesn't have any money. He was made broke in 1999. Is it grammatically correct to use this structure?
6
votes
6answers
10k views

Is “who all is” grammatically correct?

I often tend to say something like Who all is coming to the movies? And my friends correct me that I should be saying Who all are coming to the movies? So which one is correct?
0
votes
3answers
3k views

What to use in context: “surely” or “sure”

Which expression is correct: I sure hope so. I surely hope so. I would say the second one. However, the first one seems to be used more often. Or are they both correct?
46
votes
7answers
120k views

When do I use “I” instead of “me?”

From some comments in the answers for common English usage mistakes (now deleted, 10k only), there's confusion around the usage of I vs. me: While the sentence, "the other attendees are myself and ...
1
vote
1answer
41 views

“Keeping moving forward is important” - felicitous or not?

Is the following sentence felicitous or not? If it is, why? Keeping moving forward is important. The "keeping moving" is what bothers me, it sounds pretty weird to me. I am a nonnative speaker, ...
4
votes
2answers
335 views

Is it okay to use the Present Perfect tense twice in the same sentence? [duplicate]

I wonder if it is grammatically fine to use two have/has been in the same sentence? Example: After you have been informed that your paper has been accepted…
1
vote
4answers
2k views

If I wanted to say, “There are three twos in the English language,” would “twos” be the correct spelling?

Taken from this question on a blog, how would correct usage in the situation where you are talking about "to, too and two" in the english language be phrased? Would it be along the lines of "There ...
1
vote
1answer
601 views

Can we say: “The summer has been over” for a recently finished event?

I am studying Present Perfect now and I am wondering if it is correct to say, for example: The summer has been over
8
votes
3answers
513 views

Is there an exception to the prohibition against ending a sentence with “ ’s ” at work here?

The ’s can be used as a contraction representing a weak, unstressed word that is not pronounced. It allegedly cannot occur in sentence final position. She is not ready, but he is. She’s not ...
11
votes
7answers
4k views

Usage of “is when”

In grade school, when writing stories for English classes I recall being gently corrected whenever I handed pieces in that contained sentences with a structure similar to this: “A debate is ...
1
vote
2answers
80 views

Can you say “two groups of people stared at each other”?

Is it grammatically correct to say that "two groups of people stared at each other" since, by itself, a group can't do anything? It's the people within the groups that do the staring, not the groups ...
1
vote
3answers
1k views

“On the air” OR “On air”

Do you remember Northern Exposure? I hope so. Chris had a light-sign in his office: http://nevergoodbye.com/go/wp-content/uploads/2009/05/totalchris.gif And when you search google images for "on the ...
6
votes
5answers
52k views

“Disappointed in” versus “disappointed with”

I'm aware there are different prepositions possible after disappointed: with, in, of, at. I'm particulary interested in the difference between with and in. I'm disappointed with you. I'm ...
1
vote
2answers
67 views

“In which” or “of which”? [closed]

I was writing the following sentence and became lost in thought. I wasn't sure whether to use "of which" or "in which". Are either correct? If not, what is? Strict-liability crimes are crimes [of/...
0
votes
1answer
54 views

Can I use “Week start” as alternative of “Week starts on” [closed]

I want to use "Week start" for the same purpose as in Google Calendar settings: It sounds clear for English-speaking people? Or it would be better to use "Week starts on"?
21
votes
3answers
35k views

May you please explain this?

At a family dinner, my 18 year-old niece asked my sister, "May you please pass the salt?" My sister said that she was impressed with her daughter's politeness, but that that particular wording was ...
1
vote
2answers
191 views

Come to pick up vs. come pick up [closed]

This might seem like a trivial case, but I'm unsure whether to use: "he will come to pick you up" or: "he will come pick you up", i.e. without "to". If it makes any difference, the sentence ...
2
votes
1answer
147 views

Is it grammatically correct to begin a sentence with “Which” (in academic style)? [closed]

What references, or your specific expertise tell about the permissibility of passages like: "We shall assume that 2x2=5. Which, of course, is not quite correct, but..."
4
votes
2answers
428 views

Which is correct “lean on door” OR “lean against door”? [closed]

The questions is self-explanatory. I've actually seen "lean on door" to be more frequently used, but I've also heard the latter form. Is there a difference between these two forms?
11
votes
2answers
17k views

Controversy over verb choice in “neither you nor I {is/am/are} in control”

I was watching the film A Game of Shadows starring Robert Downey Junior and Jude Law when this line came up, "...neither you nor I is in control..." (I can’t remember the exact words that ended the ...
4
votes
2answers
134 views

Is “a slightest glimpse” gramatically incorrect?

In the following quotes, the word "slightest" has the indefinite article "a". Are these grammatically incorrect? A Mother's Secret by Scarlet Wilson "So what do you think?" He spun around in his ...
0
votes
2answers
551 views

To see them play and to see them playing

Excuse my limited acquaintance on English usage; which sentence is grammatically correct, and if any, which meaning do they convey to ? I saw them play chess. I saw then playing chess. Many Thanks....
0
votes
2answers
83 views

Which is correct - 2TB memories or 2TBs of memory? [duplicate]

I am working on a manual where they are trying to say that something support from 2 TB (terabytes) to 8 TB (terabytes) of flash memory per channel. The audience is programming engineers. It is ...
3
votes
1answer
61 views

“The lack of consensus impedes the process of necessary enhancements” [closed]

America's infrastructure is crumbling, and a lack of consensus in the government impedes the process of necessary enhancements that should be carried out nationwide. I'm not too sure about the bit ...
1
vote
3answers
86 views

“The population is 57,000” or “the population is 57,000 people”? [closed]

I'm having a devil of time googling this, so my apologies if this question has been answered before. Internet searching has been all but worthless, what with boolean cues being imprecise as they are. ...
14
votes
4answers
103k views

“I'm home” or “I'm at home”

The second form looks more correct to me, but the first expression is present in several titles of movies and songs. Which form is preferable?
6
votes
6answers
1k views

Do you “create” a hypothesis?

What is the most appropriate verb when talking about making a new hypothesis? E.g. Lenneburg created the critical period hypothesis. Lenneburg coined the critical period hypothesis. ...
0
votes
1answer
210 views

'Year Obtained from education' on CV meaning

So I am filling out a CV and answering about my education, when it comes up 'year obtained' I have never come across this on a CV before and if I have it hasn't been worded this way. Could someone ...
2
votes
1answer
337 views

on route vs en route

I saw today a local college (in the UK) has taken out an advert on the side of the local bus which states "on route to a better future". I'd personally expect it to be en route. Is this an idictment ...
0
votes
0answers
34 views

The using of from…to

Can I ask about the using of "from...to"? In my text, I have two sentences like this: These products may range from garment, fashion products, footwear, perfumes, cosmetics to even agro-products, ...
0
votes
0answers
34 views

that clause as an adjective

I heard some people say: All (that) I am is blue. All (that) I am is sad. This relative that clause is used as an adjective that represents adjective "sad" and "blue", right? But as far as I know, ...
-3
votes
1answer
74 views

Can the verb “let” take an adjective as an object complement like to “leave”?

I was watching "Good Wife Season 7, Episode 16". Alicia was having a private time with her new boyfriend and her mother visited her daughter's house without prior notice. Alicia tried to hide him in ...
4
votes
3answers
21k views

“Definitely” vs. “absolutely”

What's the difference between absolutely and definitely? Actually which of the following sentences is correct? You are definitely right. You are absolutely right.
0
votes
1answer
52 views

“it is not exactly clear which” vs. “it is unclear exactly which”

I wonder if the two expressions "it is not exactly clear which" and "it is unclear exactly which" are examples of a correct use of English and carry mostly the same meaning (I am aware they are ...
3
votes
2answers
34 views

What is the grammar of the quote: “There isn't a Parallel of Latitude but thinks it would have been the Equator if it had had its rights.”?

Though I understand more or less the meaning of this quote, I cannot see that it is really a grammatical English sentence. It can be found in he Chapter LXIX of Mark Twain's novel "Following the ...