Grammaticality refers to whether something obeys the rules of grammar for English.

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Do I need to use “from” after “graduated”?

I graduated high school. I graduated from high school. Which sentence is grammatically correct?
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0answers
40 views

Why is the phrase “less than 15 people” incorrect? [duplicate]

Why is the phrase less than 15 people incorrect? I just heard a radio personality flipping out over this usage.
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9answers
4k views

Is “rather” shifting to become a verb?

In colloquial English, I constantly run across sentences of the form: I rather my [noun] [verb] A quick Google search returns tons of examples: I rather my opponents don't find out. I ...
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1answer
9k views

“Broadcast” or “broadcasted”

I'm not a native English speaker, so sorry if this is a very basic question. Is broadcast a verb? If it is, what is the simple past and past participle: broadcasted?
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3answers
5k views

“Describe with” vs. “describe by”

I'm not entirely certain about when it is most appropriate to use with and by, respectively. An example should clarify my problem: We describe the input with an exponential function. or We ...
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1answer
1k views

Nationalities - When do we use the singular or plural form

I always have doubts whether to use a singular or a plural noun when I refer to certain peoples. For example, we say Americans, Italians, Brazilians, Russians and Austrians. But we say The British, ...
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2answers
63 views

Usage of neither in a sentence [closed]

Is the sentence "Neither of Jack and Jill is present here" correct? I want to use "neither" and "and" in a sentence.
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2answers
50 views

Are quotation marks necessary?

For 8th grade recognition all students selected a quote they like. Is is necessary to put in quotation marks? The authors are acknowledged and the section is titled QUOTES.
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3answers
76 views

How should I interpret “Be different like that”? [closed]

Be different like that! What does it mean? Is it grammatically correct? I don't think it has any problems, but I am not sure.
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3answers
151 views

Should “ we studied it both on- and off-site” have both hyphens?

Should the phrase "we studied it both on- and off-site" have both hyphens? Or would "we studied it both onsite and offsite" be better?
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1answer
10k views

Controversy over verb choice in “neither you nor I {is/am/are} in control”

I was watching the film A Game of Shadows starring Robert Downey Junior and Jude Law when this line came up, "...neither you nor I is in control..." (I can’t remember the exact words that ended the ...
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2answers
74 views

Which tense is (more) correct in this sentence, the present perfect or past simple?

The sentence is: "These investigations have seen several officials arrested." I'm not sure which tense I should use, the present perfect here seems more natural to me but I can't seem to find a rule ...
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2answers
96 views

Indian English: Is this a correct sentence? [closed]

Is this a correct sentence in Indian English? It is not very long when my sister will finish their graduation.
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1answer
125 views

Which one is grammatically correct: “wood door” or “wooden door”

I have a grammar which says that: "The 'noun+noun' structure is normally used to say what things are made of." "A few pairs of nouns and adjectives are used as modifiers with different meanings. ...
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1answer
165 views

“Don't you…” question

I'm studying English for 10 months. I suppose myself to know it quite well now. But I'm confused about one thing. I noticed that some of my English speaking friends sometimes ask "Don't you ...
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1answer
83 views

“weaker” or “more weak”? [closed]

Which is grammatically correct?: She has become weaker lately. She has become more weak lately.
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1answer
96 views

Can 'surgery' be a count noun in the sense of 'medical procedure'?

This is something that has bothered me for a long time. Several years ago a remember noticing in the media a shift from using "An operation" to "A surgery" when talking about someone who was ...
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2answers
5k views

Appropriate preposition to go with “concerned”

He is deeply concerned for vulnerable children. Is this correct? Or is there a better preposition to use instead of for? What exactly does this phrase mean? What about "He is deeply concerned ...
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1answer
88 views

Please help me to understand if this sentence is correct [closed]

Please make sure that you selected all file (For when the upload box is empty.)
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5answers
6k views

Is “who all is” grammatically correct?

I often tend to say something like Who all is coming to the movies? And my friends correct me that I should be saying Who all are coming to the movies? So which one is correct?
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1answer
79 views

Which one is grammatically correct, with “the” or without “the”? Why? [closed]

An Introduction to the History and Principles of Heraldry. An Introduction to History and Principles of Heraldry. Which one is grammatically correct, with "the" or without "the"? Why?
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1answer
55 views

Meaning and Emphasis Depending on the Placement of “Only” [duplicate]

My dog only likes people food. My dog likes only people food. My dog likes people food only. In each of these sentences, how does "only" affect it (i.e. emphasis and meaning)? Are any ...
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3answers
9k views

“I haven't got” vs. “I don't have”

Which is the correct way of saying this in English? I haven't got any money. I don't have any money. If both are correct, which is the difference between them?
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3answers
273 views

Is “Are” always used with plural verbs/nouns? [duplicate]

Examples: There's six seasons, dude. Wouldn't it be: There're six seasons, dude. We are talking about multiple items; six seasons. If we refer to multiple items, we should use "Are" in ...
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7answers
10k views

Can “cattle” be singular?

I've grown up on a farm, and my dad and his dad, apparently, always used "cattle" to refer to both the singular and plural forms of the domestic bovine. I've always assumed it's how the word "deer" ...
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8answers
180k views

Which is correct, “you and I” or “you and me”?

When the phrase is used as an object, why so many native speakers are saying "you and I" instead of "you and me"? I'm not a native speaker but I thought "you and me" is correct. Not sure if this falls ...
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2answers
16k views

“Studying PhD at the university” or “studying PhD in the university”?

Which of these two sentences is correct: I am studying PhD at the university. I am studying PhD in the university. Should I use "at" or "in"? Or is there no difference?
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1answer
15k views

Plural of table leaf

In the context of a table leaf, what is the correct plural term, "table leafs" or "table leaves"?
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1answer
114 views

Can you start a sentence with “Hopefully,…”? [duplicate]

I am studying for the SAT, and I learned just now that the following sentence is grammatically incorrect: Hopefully, we will be able to complete the building before the rainy season sets in. ...
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11answers
7k views

Can a sentence start with “Because”?

In my grade school days, I recall a teacher proclaiming to the class: You should never start a sentence with the word "Because". Of course, I've since seen lots of examples to the contrary, and ...
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2answers
60 views

What does “in forming a human being” mean?

I just want to understand what the speaker meant in this sentence. I think there is nothing more important in forming a human being than your family.
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3answers
86 views

Correct use of 'comprise'

Is this sentence grammatically correct? "The application site comprises an existing care home which has 59 bedrooms and 85 registered bed spaces" I was under the impression that 'comprise' would ...
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3answers
249 views

Give it me! Write me! [duplicate]

Our young grandson, who is a Mancunian, says 'give it me', and 'give it me back', which is a northern British standard. It made me think that it is not only northerners who omit the indirect object ...
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3answers
289 views

Why is “till” used in this expression: “If we don't leave till after lunch…”?

If we don't leave till after lunch we'll be cutting it very fine. I understand it to mean: "If we don't leave after lunch, we'll be cutting it very fine." (In the event of our not leaving ...
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1answer
183 views

Why not 'somewhy'?

When I originally wrote this ELL question, I used 'somewhy' instead of 'for some reason' for want of concision. Only afterwards, a user kindly advised that 'somewhy' obsolesced. But why? Google led ...
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40 views

Comma before “or” in a series?

Example: "Your answer must be yes, no, or maybe." Is that correctly punctuated? Thanks!
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6answers
5k views

Can you say “absolutely good”?

You often hear people follow up the word "absolutely" with words such as "fantastic", "amazing", "brilliant", "knackered". But to hear say someone say "That was absolutely good" or "I am absolutely ...
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0answers
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Is “…that he doesn't even know where is” grammatical?

I was recently invited to a party by a Facebook friend. I asked him where the party was happening, and he said he couldn't remember the address. While texting someone else about the experience, I ...
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1answer
86 views

Correct according to British English language rules [closed]

I have a sentence which looks as if it may have some grammar rules problems. Can someone correct it according to British English rules? I am going to hospital to see a friend who has undergone ...
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1answer
56 views

“Conceal Carry” vs. “Concealed Carry”

I have been doing some research on firearms law lately, and have run across a lot of people using the phrase "conceal carry" to describe people carrying a concealed firearm. In my opinion, this should ...
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6answers
10k views

I <verb> and am <rest of sentence>

I sometimes find myself writing something like this: XXX is a project I admire and am very interested in. The "I <verb> and am <something>" feels strange here. It somehow sounds more ...
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4answers
4k views

Check the grammar for “returned back”

Is there an error in this sentence? When Darun heard the news that his father had been hospitalised he cancelled his trip and returned back to his village. I think the error is 'back' but I need ...
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3answers
823 views

“Nobody will help you but me” vs. “Nobody will help you but I”

As has been shown in another question, in comparisons with than both the accusative and the nominative are possible and grammatical: He loves you more than I. He loves you more than me. ...
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3answers
85 views

“some time” or “some times”

I've found an error identification question and its answer from a website and wonder whether this was right. The question says: He has been working here for sometimes. And the answer is: He ...
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7answers
3k views

Can a person happen? Is “Zodanga happened” correct?

I was watching movie John Carter where there was some dialogue like this: — What happened here? — Zodanga happened. Here Zodanga was a bad guy in the movie. I don't understand how a guy ...
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1answer
71 views

Is it acceptable to say 'quite occasionally'

I quite occasionally play chess. Is it acceptable to say 'quite occasionally'
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2answers
115 views

If it was'nt / hadn't been for

Would I rather say He would have forgotten about the incident, if it wasn't for the huge backpack or He would have forgotten about the incident, if it hadn't been for the huge backpack or ...
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2answers
151 views

What is the correct possessive form of “Drs. Smith”

I want to address two Doctor Smiths via the abbreviation Drs. Smith; what is correct the possessive form of that (plural) noun phrase? Is it Drs. Smith's? An example sentence: Drs. Smith's house is ...
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2answers
104 views

Should I use “a” or “an” before a foreign word that starts with a “u”?

I have a foreign word that begins with the letter "u", and don't know whether to use "a" or "an". The word is "unitario". It's a word used mainly in Argentina to describe a T.V. show comprising ...
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2answers
148 views

Which is grammatically correct, “I” personally, or “me” personally?

"Good luck to each of you with your endeavors, and if the Association, or me personally, can do anything to assist you, please don't hesitate to contact me."