Grammaticality refers to whether something obeys the rules of grammar for English.

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It's not affect, but can you “effect” something?

I understand the differences between affect and effect, and generally when to use them. However, in some cases while reading I have seen authors use the phrase "effect a change" (among others) ...
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1answer
115 views

“Too low for the price” or “too less for the price” [closed]

Too low for the price Too less for the price Please suggest which one is correct grammatically. Scenarios: The cost for 15 minute show was Rupees 50. It is too low for the price. I ...
9
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4answers
11k views

Would you use the word “swum” these days?

Would you use the word "swum" these days? I mean, grammatically, it is the past participle of the verb "to swim", but it seems to me that no one uses it anymore. If it's the case, how would You ...
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2answers
91 views

For those who know (who knows) [closed]

Which one sentence is correct: "For those who know" or "For those who knows"? Google gives me about the same number (1 070 000 vs 783 000) of search results.
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3answers
809 views

Be/keep/stay in touch

Are all these forms correct? Let's be in touch Let's keep in touch Let's stay in touch Thanks
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1answer
327 views

Sentence patterns: There are 16 ways to “leave” your book

Playing around in my head the different positions that a subject; verb; direct object; and indirect object can be positioned in one sentence, I ended up with 16 sentences using only the simple past ...
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1answer
73 views

Comma after the noun of the Oxford comma?

In a sentence like: Next to apple, pears, and bananas, a lot of other fruit exists. Is the comma after bananas needed, allowed, or forbidden? And why? Is the same true for descriptions with ...
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2answers
256 views

Complex compound adjective (adverbial phrase + participle)

A relative of mine and I have hit a brick wall in trying to agree on the grammaticality and stylistic suitability of one his sentences: However, it proved incapable of jeopardizing the ...
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3answers
268 views

He or him in this sentence?

Just read this line on the Guardian: He dismantles his bedroom and helps tidy the house, daubing white paint over the pencil marks on the doorframe which have measured the growth of he and his ...
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2answers
174 views

One of the underlined words is wrong. Choose either A, B, C or D [closed]

"What (are:A) you talking (about:B)? (I'm:C) not (understand:D) you." At first, I thought C, so the sentence would be "What are you talking about? I don't understand you." And I chose C because I ...
2
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2answers
200 views

Solution of/to/for equation

A recent question to when to use of and when for/to for solution suggested that of appears only in context of chemistry, and the word means something very different then. But I recalled almost ...
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2answers
736 views

“I am a big fan of you” or “I am a big fan of yours”?

Which one of them is correct? "I am a big fan of you" or "I am a big fan of yours" ?** I think the last one, but the first one seems ok.
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4answers
96 views

'how many of us' vs. 'how many of we'

Which is correct: 'My friend asked how many of us are going to watch the Superbowl' or 'My friend asked how many of we are going to watch the Superbowl' Note: 'my friend' is not a part of the group ...
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1answer
77 views

Is this sentence grammatical? [closed]

Since the formulas f(x)=a+b and g(x)=s-d hold and by definition of f(x), g(x) we have f(x)+g(x)=(a+b)(s-d). Is this sentence grammatical?
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1answer
49 views

Is this sentence grammatical? [closed]

I wonder if this sentence is grammatical? Besides the information has been leaked today, other information was also leaked last month.
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2answers
108 views

“Can I” vs “May I” [duplicate]

You may have heard the argument "it's not can I go to the bathroom, it's may I." If this is true, then any question such as "can you get me a glass of water?" could have the same argument applied to ...
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2answers
51 views

Number usage in a series [closed]

Is it right to say that the percentage decreases by 10% each time, like in this example: Around 30% of politicians throughout the world are women. A significant 30% is represented in Scandinavian ...
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2answers
121 views

A study of awake and awaken

It has been drawn to my attention that I may not be using the verb 'awake'correctly in the active and passive. Please could someone confirm that I have now got this right. In their simple present ...
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2answers
84 views

Why use 'about them' in this sentence?

Why use 'about them' in this sentence? I appreciate every kind of person, most notably those who have a good sense of humour, a positive outlook on life as well as a good energy about them. ...
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2answers
81 views

To see them play and to see them playing

Excuse my limited acquaintance on English usage; which sentence is grammatically correct, and if any, which meaning do they convey to ? I saw them play chess. I saw then playing chess. Many ...
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4answers
3k views

Using “And” at the beginning of a sentence

Since I first learned English, I have been holding this understanding that "and", as a conj. but unlike "but", can only connect two clauses, not two sentences ended with periods. But recently, I ...
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3answers
39k views

“Solution for” or “solution to” a problem?

I need to find a solution to/for this problem. Can to and for be used interchangeably here? Is one of them just plain wrong?
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3answers
129 views

“Went and got” — is it grammatically correct?

Trying to find out if phrases like "went and got" are correct, e.g.: She went and got the book.
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1answer
53 views

Because of in the beginning of a sentence [duplicate]

Is this sentence right? " I eventually go to that restaurant. Because of the prices I can't afford to go there very often" Can I start a sentence using "Because of"?? Thanks
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3answers
192 views

Using three examples with “range from”

When using range from with two examples, it could be: I should note that our current users range from juniors to graduates. But when using three examples: I should note that our current ...
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3answers
787 views

Use of “parley” meaning to convert?

I sometimes use the word "parley" as a verb effectively meaning "to convert from one language or system to another". Such as Stargate parleys the Egyptian deities into villainous star-faring ...
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6answers
41k views

“Take a rest” or “have some rest”?

Which one of the above is the correct, or can I use both? Or is there any better way to say that?
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2answers
92 views

Every human being is of (value / of value / of valuable) regardless of his or her religion, nationality, or gender [closed]

Every human being is ( ) regardless of his or her religion, nationality, or gender. value of value valuables of valuable The correct answer was "2. of value" and my main question was ...
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5answers
317 views

“I don't understand you” vs. “I'm not understanding you” [closed]

Which sentence is correct? What are you talking about? I don't understand you. What are you talking about? I'm not understanding you. That was a question we've had in an exam and it was: ...
2
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1answer
51 views

Use of “had” in this sentence

This sentence pertains to a movie I watched: I wish I watched it with subtitles. I wish I had watched it with subtitles. What effect does adding had have on the sentence? Are both sentences ...
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30k views

Sentences beginning with “so”?

This also came up on either a BBC or CBC science program, but not as a linguistically-oriented discussion. Over the last two or three years I've noticed a lot more people starting a sentence with ...
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2answers
136 views

“[Is/are] X and Y the reason[s] you did Z?”

Is the violence and the abuse the reason you ran away home? Are the violence and the abuse the reasons you ran away from home? Is the violence and the abuse the reasons you ran away home? ...
23
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7answers
6k views

Is it acceptable to start a sentence with “however”?

I have heard that starting a sentence with however is wrong. What are the grounds for this view and is it still held by a majority of pedants? They would suggest changing However, some people are ...
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5answers
555 views

To whoever it may concern

I received a letter of confirmation for funding from an English native speaker. She started the letter with: To whoever it may concern, I am not a native speaker, but that sounds quite odd to me ...
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“On the air” OR “On air”

Do you remember Northern Exposure? I hope so. Chris had a light-sign in his office: http://nevergoodbye.com/go/wp-content/uploads/2009/05/totalchris.gif And when you search google images for "on the ...
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speaking about time known now but not when the readers read the message

I am writing to a university. Plus, XXX University is doing a great in the researching areas. For example, just a week ago, researchers from this university joined the ESA's Rosetta mission, that ...
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2answers
102 views

Is this an oxymoron

Is the following quote an oxymoron? I hope the events at the Olympics will be uneventful (meaning lacking any terrorist attacks, etc.)
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1answer
82 views

How to combine in a sentence two verb–preposition pairs that have the same TWO objects?

How could one combine succinctly two verbs with the same two objects with different prepositions? For example, if I can either add gifts to a box and remove gifts from the box, what would be the most ...
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6answers
17k views

Which is correct: “the below information” or “the information below”?

I frequently see statements that refer to something later in the text that use a phrase such as "the below information". Is it more correct instead to say "the information below" (or "the following ...
17
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3answers
3k views

May you please explain this?

At a family dinner, my 18 year-old niece asked my sister, "May you please pass the salt?" My sister said that she was impressed with her daughter's politeness, but that that particular wording was ...
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7answers
1k views

How to conclude long “whether … or” clauses

I have found that the form "whether this or that" does not work so well in long sentences. Intuitively, it seems that putting an "if" after the "or" makes it flow better, but is that grammatically ...
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5k views

Is “architect” a verb and a noun?

I hear the word architect used as a verb in the technical field and now more often in other industries and groups, for example: We need to architect a better solution to the problem. I am ...
3
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1answer
68 views

Does conjugation reduction require a hyphen in the affected words?

In a sentence where we have two listed words that are hyphenated, we can omit the latter part of the first compound and still be grammatically correct: I don't believe we will ever find ...
4
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2answers
7k views

Is “could've” or “should've” standard English?

As the title says — is "could've" or "should've" standard English or is it slang and should correctly be spelled "could have" and "should have"?
3
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3answers
2k views

Is “more poorly” an appropriate phrase?

Today I described someone as being trained to react "more poorly" to a given situation. Her current reaction is poor. It is becoming more poor. So she reacts more poorly. Is this correct? It sounds ...
3
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2answers
454 views

Is “may the force be equal to mass times acceleration” proper English?

There is a meme going around in which a game-show contestant is given the phrase: May the force … And they finish the phrase with: … be equal to mass times acceleration. My ...
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1answer
254 views

Is it “as wonderful as them” or “as wonderful as they”? [duplicate]

I have a few questions on terminology, first, actually, as having the right terminology may have enabled me to answer this question on my own. What is the terminology for such constructs, "as ...
28
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8answers
17k views

What is wrong with the word “performant”?

I keep getting the red underlining in Word whenever I write the word "performant". Here I intend to refer to something that performs well or better than something else (ie it's more performant). Is ...
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1answer
33 views

“Not only should I” in declarative sentence [duplicate]

There is a phrase "Not only should I succeed but others should fail". And I saw it many times in similar structures that the order of words "should I" are as if they were in a questioning sentence. ...
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34 views

Is 'Regards by' a valid usage

Is 'Regards by' term correct when we end an e-mail. I have seen ending mail using "With Regards, Warm Regards, Regards" but 'Regards by' seems somewhere wrong, please correct me if I am.