Grammaticality refers to whether something obeys the rules of grammar for English.

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Is “Even I too.” a valid sentence?

Consider the following conversations: A: "I must leave now because I have to be home in 30 minutes." B: "Even I too." A: "I am getting bored." B: "Even I too." Is the response valid? I ...
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Order of words and punctuation in a sentence [closed]

I am writing a sentence whose word order and punctuation has put me in a fix. Can I get some opinions on whether the construction is correct, grammatically? Ask him what becomes of the dogs he ...
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Can I end this sentence with “also” or “too”? Which one is right?

Please see the sentences: I scheduled to stay after school with you today, but yesterday I was assigned a detention for today too. I scheduled to stay after school with you today, but ...
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Functionality vs. Functionalities: are both correct pluralizations?

To me, inasmuch as use of the word functionality referring to software means the extent of its overall ability, I would write "The software implements the following functionality." However, I've seen ...
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“Neither” and “either” usage in negative sentence

I would like to make sure I understood the usage of these: Do you want A or B? I do not want either. [none of them] I want neither. [Can I say that?]
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Is the usage “can able to” wrong? I believe it's wrong. But where can I find some reference on the same?

I hear a lot of people use 'can able to' in their daily talk. I believe it's entirely wrong. Both 'can' and 'able to' hold the same meaning. Where do I get more information on the same and also the ...
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Can one answer “Have you got…?” with “Yes, I've got.”?

As an American in Europe I often get questions about the British "have got" which is hard for me to answer since I have little feeling for what is correct. E.g. someone today asked me: If someone ...
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4answers
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“Haven't you?” or “don't you?”

What is the right question tag (in British English) when we use the verb have? I have interviewed a few native speakers and none of them could explain why sometimes they prefer "haven't/hasn't" and ...
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Is “might could” a correct construct?

I have a friend from the southern U.S. who uses the phrase “might could” quite often. He’ll say, for example: I might could do that this weekend. When I first heard him say this, it made me do ...
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2answers
255 views

Is this a correct English sentence: “I'm not quite well enough ready yet.”

I was talking to someone recently and blurted out as I had to move on to another task "I am not quite well enough ready yet" which sparked a discussion about if that was correct English. Although I'll ...
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“For how long have you been…” vs. “how long have you been…”

Ante-scriptum: The question should be quite a frequently arising one, so this might be a duplicate. If it is, I haven't found it previously asked here I don't know if the title is meaningful, but ...
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I want the exact answer and difference between these two? [closed]

have you spoke to her (or) have you speak to her? Which is correct?
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Is “Thanks a ton” a commonly used phrase?

Is it correct to say so? Does this mean the same as "thanks a lot"?
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153 views

In what dialects is “I don't like it too” grammatical?

Consider: Too — (adv.) also, as well, in addition. We don’t usually use too in negative clauses; we use either instead: I don’t like that kind of stuff. I don’t like it either. That said, ...
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“Would have” in conditional clauses

I have been taught to use the if I had form in conditional clauses referring to the past: If the president had asked me, I would have told him the same thing. As far as I can tell though, the ...
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265 views

Do the -ing and to-infinitive “verbs” that follow catenative verbs always take the grammatical function of “noun”?

I'm wondering whether or not the verb form that follows a catenative verb has the grammatical function of a noun or of a verb, and whether or not it depends on the first catenative verb. "I like to ...
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165 views

Different between 'effect' and 'impact'

Someone asks me this question: 'How much work is it to fix issue? then I'm trying to determine potential impact.' My answer is that 'very little work should to be done to fix this issue. And there is ...
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Unless in third conditional sentences

"Jane wouldn't have found a job unless she had gone to London" is a natural-sounding sentence and has two different meanings, depending on whether Jane really did move to London or not: (1) "Jane ...
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Verb agreement in “Where is the Messiah and his Kingdom?”

Where is the Messiah and his Kingdom? I think it should be "Where are the Messiah and his kingdom"; it just sounds better! But my friends and even a teacher claim that "is" would be correct.
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Can one use 'prepare' instead of 'be prepared' or 'be ready'?

a) - The document you requested will take four days to be ready. b) - The document you requested will take four days to prepare. Does (b) give the same meaning as (a)? Is this a correct way to use ...
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1answer
98 views

Is it grammatical to use “same” or “the same” in substitution for an objective pronoun?

I've seen and heard this usage of the pronoun "same" more than once, and it sounded strange to my ears: "Thank you for the book; I will return same shortly." "Wine production has increased, ...
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2answers
194 views

Why use 'about them' in this sentence?

Why use 'about them' in this sentence? I appreciate every kind of person, most notably those who have a good sense of humour, a positive outlook on life as well as a good energy about them. ...
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234 views

Can 'post' and 'after' used interchangeably?

I notice few colleagues use 'post' almost everywhere. Today one of them said 'lets meet up post noon' and I thought shouldn't it be 'afternoon'? I could be okay with 'post lunch' but somehow 'post ...
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correct way of cooking

What is correct Sometimes I cook for myself or Sometimes I cook myself. This sounds like cooking self, which is not true. I've heard ( most of times ) people use second phrase. Which of the two ...
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“For both our sake” or “for both our sakes”

Should sake be pluralized in this usage? For both our sake, I'm going to leave now. For both our sakes, I'm going to leave now.
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“Due to” at the beginning of a sentence

I tried to say this: Due to it will have less features than the actual standard system, the performance will be better. Basically, I used a sentence after due to, and one of my English friends ...
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122 views

Can a sentence end in “left”

Which is the correct phrase: You have 5 days left of your trial. or: You have 5 days of your trial left.
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Is the use of “Elysial” acceptable / correct? [closed]

Based on the following definition: elysian adj (Classical Myth & Legend) of or relating to Elysium delightful; glorious; blissful Collins English Dictionary – Complete ...
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263 views

Do I need to use a comma before “everyone” to set off the vocative? [duplicate]

While I was writing a status update today on social media I decided to do some grammar-learning. The status update was "Happy Labor Day everyone!" and I am now wondering if I should place a comma ...
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I will drive into town… but I can't drive

My girlfriend messaged me earlier to say "I will drive into town with my mother". I thought this was odd, since she doesn't have a licence. Turns out she meant that her mother will be driving, and she ...
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Which one is more correct: “works at a university” or “works in a university”?

My relative is a fairly big academic and works at a university. Is this correct? or should I have used in instead?
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29 views

'Make' vs. 'makes' in “this makes” and “this does make”? [duplicate]

In English grammar, to my understanding, it is incorrect to say "this does makes," but I'm not sure why (and nor does my mother, who is an editor). It is acceptable to say "this makes [sense]," and ...
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Can just a noun phrase be a complete list item? [closed]

In the following extract: [A number of issues had to be considered.] Firstly, the scope of her responsibilities. ... “the scope of her responsibilities” is just a noun phrase used as a ...
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“Sally broke her leg” vs. “Sally has broken her leg”? How does switching the past simple with the present perfect affect meaning?

Earlier today I had a private lesson with an Italian student—intermediate level, who has been studying the present perfect vs. past simple tense. His teacher had given him an exercise where a list of ...
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1answer
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How do I use “as of now” correctly?

Just to clarify, I am not a native English speaker. I occasionally hear from other non-native English speakers the use of the phrase: "As of now" with the meaning of Currently. Initially I did not ...
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69 views

Is there any difference between “like” and “as”?

Why is it not right to say: He speaks like his father does. But it’s quite correct to say: He speaks like his father. He speaks as his father does.
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“Has” or “Have” after “Who” in a sentence?

I'm confused about using "has" or "have" after "who". For example: I am a doctor who have confusion in using has or Have. I am a engineer who has 4 year experience, degree in engineering and is ...
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2answers
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Can an adjective follow dynamic verbs (“leave”, “declare”)?

I know that an adjective can come after some verbs, such as: be, become, feel, get, look, seem, smell, sound. These verbs are "stative" verbs, which express a state or change of state. For example: ...
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“On the one/other hand” vs. “on the one/other side”

There are two slightly different expressions which do mean the exact same thing, these are: On the one hand [...]. on the other hand [...] On the one side [...]. on the other side [...] ...
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“Do you want” vs “Do you not want”

I recently came across a funny picture with these questions: Do you want som drugs? No Do you not want some drugs? Presumably the answear is supposed to be "no" since you always say no to drugs, ...
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Do we have to mention the things we refer to after the word “one of these”

Do we have to mention the things we refer to after the word "one of these" For example.... "I have a lot of cars.One of these is BMW" "I have a lot of cars.One of these cars is BMW" Which one of ...
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Using term “shot dead”

I'm curious about newscasters using the term "shot dead" in describing the death of a gun shot victim. Is this correct? They would never describe a survivor as "shot live".
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What is the Grammatical mistakes in “The pity is that no sooner he had left the place than the fire broke out”? [closed]

What is/are the Grammatical mistakes in "The pity is that no sooner he had left the place than the fire broke out" ?
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When should I use “a” versus “an” in front of a word beginning with the letter h?

A basic grammar rule is to use an instead of a before a vowel sound. Given that historic is not pronounced with a silent h, I use “a historic”. Is this correct? What about heroic? Should be “It was a ...
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1answer
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“And been” when “has” has been said in the sentence already?

I have the sentence "The role has gotten easier and easier to play, and been forced upon me more frequently than not." I was wondering if "and been" is correct to use in this case, or if "has" must be ...
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Is it possible to say so very and very so?

I know that it is correct to use: Thank you so very much. As much as I know an adverb can be theoretically used to modify another adverb, so my question is: Is it possible to say very so ...
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Lack intellectually or Lacking intellectually

I came across a phrase on the internet that seemed wrong (surprise): "[...] especially for those who lack intellectually." In my opinion, this should say "especially for those [who are] lacking ...
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60 views

“I won't stay longer than I can help” or “longer than I can't help”?

I'm a non-native speaker of English and the following sentence makes me wonder: "I won't stay longer than I can help." I've heard similar uses of "can help" in other contexts and they all ...
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Is it third person singular or plural? [duplicate]

Do I need to add a suffix -s to the verbs in the following cases? Her academic background combined with her working experience...provideS... Her academic and professional experience.. provideS... I ...
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Are these default questions about events correct grammatically? [closed]

As you can see below, I created some default questions which are supposed to ask about events that either have happened or will happen in future(the gaps will be filled by different events such as ...