Grammaticality refers to whether something obeys the rules of grammar for English.

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14
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14k views

“Like something more” or “like something better”

When people like something more than something else, it's common for me to hear them say they like it better than something else. Is this proper English? I've always thought the word more fits better, ...
3
votes
2answers
709 views

I need <something> yesterday?

Is it correct to say: I need those reports, and I need them yesterday. Shouldn't it be: I needed those reports yesterday. Or is this aberrant usage style simply a colloquialism?
12
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4answers
2k views

Collective nouns and subject-verb agreement: general rule or arbitrary?

A newspaper ran this headline recently: (1) Police crack down on IAC protesters. [emph added] Why did it not read: (2) ? Police cracks down on IAC protesters. I have found instances of ...
1
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2answers
217 views

The use of “So X as to Y”

First of all, note that this is not a duplicate question of another one asking about the usage of so as to, since this one is asking about the structure of so . . . as to. . . . I understand this ...
0
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2answers
64 views

Is this sentence correct grammatically? [closed]

Do you have any knowledge at photography? Is this sentence correct? I don't think so, the at doesn't sound right, but my friend says some grammar checker tells that its correct?
-2
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2answers
65 views

Claim a stake or stake a claim?

Which of the following is a correct usage? CLAIM A STAKE or STAKE A CLAIM I am highly confused about these two. How to use them in sentences? Though the first one appears to be correct to ...
2
votes
3answers
445 views

Can a possessive pronoun be used in a tag question?

Can we use possessive pronouns in tag questions? For example, Your name is Ben, isn't yours?
-1
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1answer
22 views

Is “Write something also on. . . .” ok?

In the following sentence, is the usage of also considered grammatically correct, or is there something wrong with it? Write something also on an alternative approach to this problem; explain ...
10
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7answers
24k views

Is it ok to start a sentence with “also”?

Is it ok to start a sentence with also? Also, I had given him the file you sent me.
1
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1answer
81 views

Is “likes nothing less” or “likes nothing more” correct?

He likes nothing less than an extremely sophisticated life. He likes nothing more than an extremely sophisticated life. Both look meaningfully similar. In the first one, 'less' appears to ...
5
votes
3answers
1k views

“Where are you now at?” — grammatically correct?

Should I say "Where are you at now?" or "Where are you now at?" Which is grammatically correct? And is there any difference in meaning between the two?
0
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0answers
20 views

What is the gramatically correct form? [duplicate]

What is the gramatically correct form: "my mom and dad's house" or "my mom's and dad's house"?
0
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1answer
41 views

“Charge it by the blink” vs. “charge it in blinks”

Which of these sentences is grammatically and semantically more appropriate? Lawyers measure time and charge it by the blink. Lawyers measure time and charge it in blinks.
0
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0answers
24 views

“Page Not Found” - is it grammatically correct? [duplicate]

404 - Page Not Found Every time I see this error message, I think: is it grammatically correct? Because I have the feeling that the verb is missing.
-2
votes
1answer
183 views

Thing count or thingS count [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: “User accounts” or “users account” Should a list of tokens be called a “token list” or a “tokens list” “BookList” or “booksList?” When there ...
-1
votes
2answers
142 views

“Countries List” or “Country List”? [duplicate]

Duplicate of: “User accounts” or “users account” “Employee list” or “employees list” Should a list of tokens be called a “token list” or a “tokens list” “BookList” or “booksList?” Is it ...
3
votes
1answer
120 views

“A mice problem” vs. “a mouse problem”

My friend said to me one day: "We have a mice problem at UNI". Is "a mice problem" grammatical as opposed to "a mouse problem"?
3
votes
2answers
14k views

“Why do not you come here?” vs “Why do you not come here?”

I have two questions. What is the difference between "Why do not you come here?" and "Why do you not come here?"? Are both of "Why do not you come here?" and "Why do you not come here?" ...
9
votes
4answers
35k views

Is a thumb also a finger?

The thumb has a different name compared to the other fingers (index, middle, ring, little) and it does not end with "finger". Also, when referring to the hand, I have seen literature where it is ...
5
votes
4answers
2k views

“Reveal” vs. “revelation” as nouns

I just posed this question on sci-fi.stackexchange and had my wording corrected from reveal to revelation. I realise that to have said that too early in the film would have ruined the big reveal. ...
14
votes
1answer
17k views

Which is correct: “you and I” or “you and me”?

I was told the correct usage is for example: "My wife and me" but I hear often "I and my wife" or "my wife and I". Google gives 34M results for "My wife and I" and 909K results for "My wife and me" ...
8
votes
1answer
144 views

Why is my English “worlds better” than yours but never “the best by worlds”?

In speech when making comparisons we can say: It is far better than It's way better than It's miles better than It's worlds better than For instance, British restaurant food is ...
1
vote
1answer
10k views

Is it “my passion lies in” or “my passion is”?

I have the following sentence in my résumé: My passion lies in analyzing complex algorithms. Someone pointed out to me that it is not correct, and that it should be: My passion is analyzing ...
1
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3answers
2k views

How do they express the time, in American and British English?

I don't know if this is a good question. But as far as I know, and as I do it, American English also say "after" other than "past" in expressing times. For example, a quarter after six instead of, a ...
5
votes
4answers
5k views

“Me being” versus “my being” [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: Gerund preceded by possessive pronoun (e.g. “He resents your being more popular than he is”) Until a few months ago, I had always thought that sentences like ...
0
votes
1answer
61 views

The delivery may be accelerated?

I'm writing a quotation and have to estimate a delivery date. My estimate is that we will make the delivery at January 1st. However, this will be impacted by when the project starts. It is in our ...
12
votes
4answers
17k views

Is “redact” an acceptable substitute for “delete” or “omit?”

I am constantly reading comments and documents from people who use the verb redact to refer to the act of deleting or otherwise censoring content. This never seemed correct to me, but until today it ...
2
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2answers
144 views

Can Neither-Or be used?

My friend was reading the book "The Fault in Our Stars" by John Green and she found what seems to be a grammar mistake. The following sentence is found in the author's note: Neither novels or ...
3
votes
2answers
189 views

Is the use of ”comfort” ok in this text?

I received a letter today from my opticians and my roommate claims one of its sentences is not grammatical. When you collect your spectacles, an Optical Advisor will check their fit and comfort, ...
3
votes
2answers
291 views

Is it grammatical to introduce a result clause using “then”?

Is it grammatical to introduce a result clause by using then as in these examples: Don’t be lazy – then you will fail. Don’t kill him – then you will regret it. If so, then is the then in these ...
1
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2answers
128 views

Is “Studying will help me with achieving my dreams” grammatical?

I need to take sentences out of a transcript, so I can’t change the structure of this particular sentence. I can either use it in my work as a grammatically correct sentence, or I can't. I just ...
3
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2answers
350 views

When is it ok to create a contraction of words followed by “s”?

When is it correct to create a contraction of words followed by is? For instance is who’s a correct short form of who is?
0
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2answers
278 views

Is “in a greater scale” grammatical?

Say the facts are Method A produces score of 101. Method B produces score of 102. when using data set 1, but when using data set 2: Method A produces score of 100. Method B produces score of ...
0
votes
2answers
57 views

“Cannot believe what he saw” versus “cannot believe what he was seeing” [duplicate]

Which of the following sentences is grammatical: The boss could not believe what he saw yesterday morning when he entered the office. The boss could not believe what he was seeing yesterday morning ...
-1
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2answers
431 views

Is “I is free” grammatical [closed]

I heard the sentence “I is free” in the movie Django Unchained. But is that really a well-formed sentence grammatically? Could I use it myself in regular conversation?
2
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3answers
133 views

Is “Hers was a good point” grammatical?

Would it be grammatical to say: Hers was also a good point to include a header specifying the contact person. as opposed to: It was also a good point she made to include a header specifying ...
2
votes
2answers
2k views

Is it grammatical to say: Your understanding is correct? [closed]

Is it grammatically correct to say: Your understanding is correct to re-assure a concept?
1
vote
3answers
172 views

Is “was always with you” or “had always been with you” grammatically correct?

In those days wherever you went I had always been with you like a shadow. In those days wherever you went I was always with you like a shadow. Which one is grammatically correct?
6
votes
2answers
493 views

According to me, it was acceptable, but according to him, it wasn't

I once had a piece of written work corrected by a very experienced English teacher who told me that writing "according to me" sounded weird and nobody who was English/British would ever say it. I ...
3
votes
1answer
177 views

Is this Adverbial a complement or an adjunct?

According to Wiki, Adverbials are typically divided into four classes: adverbial complements (i.e. obligatory adverbial) are adverbials that render a sentence ungrammatical and meaningless if ...
6
votes
3answers
247 views

Why can’t you say “I fell the stairs”?

The verb to fall strongly implies the direction down, but in some circumstances it is obligatory (in StdAmEng) to include the word “down.” The example I have in mind right now is I fall down the ...
8
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5answers
4k views

Is it correct to say “What was your name?”?

Is it correct to say "What was your name?"? The reason I am asking this is, generally the name of the person will not change. One should say "What is your name?" ...
6
votes
2answers
207 views

Is this correct usage of “it's”?

I saw this in an English text, and I was wondering if the "it's" here is used correctly: The morality of it’s debatable but you can ... I would be inclined to write it as: The morality of it ...
0
votes
3answers
186 views

“To mentor someone during a project” vs. “to mentor someone on a project”

..., whom I mentored during his final semester's project. ..., whom I mentored on his final semester's project. Which of these two is grammatically correct? Since I am not talking about ...
0
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2answers
236 views

I can speak a little bit of German

I was asked to introduce myself and what languages I spoke. So I mentioned all the languages I know and in the end, I added "... and I can speak a little bit of German" After I said that, I was ...
21
votes
5answers
6k views

Using “And” at the beginning of a sentence

Since I first learned English, I have been holding this understanding that "and", as a conj. but unlike "but", can only connect two clauses, not two sentences ended with periods. But recently, I ...
-1
votes
4answers
325 views

The expression “not so much”

I have noticed the appearance of the phrase "not so much" in the language recently. It strikes me as both grammatically incorrect and humorous when used. For example,"Jim is very smart; his brother, ...
-1
votes
1answer
25 views

“The horizontal and vertical transfers” vs. “the horizontal and the vertical transfers” [duplicate]

The Horizontal and vertical tranfers in Local Governement Is this fragment grammatically correct?
2
votes
5answers
404 views

“Have some reason you” or “Have some reason why you”

Can the "why" be removed from the phrase "have some reason why you?" Example: Do you have some reason you ____? vs. Do you have some reason why you ____? Are these both grammatically ...
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2answers
69 views

Difference between “all the” and simply “all” [duplicate]

In a mail from my professor, I read you need to specify all the fields. Here, he gave us a form with about 25 fields. He asked us to fill out the fields. I'm skeptical about the usage of the ...