Grammaticality refers to whether something obeys the rules of grammar for English.

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-1
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2answers
54 views

“may you” or “can you”? [closed]

Which is correct? Can you please fax me the document? May you please fax me the document?
4
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3answers
16k views

Why is this sentence correct? “She suggested that he go to the cinema.”

Why is this sentence correct? She suggested that he go to the cinema. I would definitely use goes instead of go.
5
votes
5answers
30k views

“Improvement in/on/of/to something”

What is the correct preposition to use after improvement? For example, The successful candidate is expected to contribute with an improvement of the current calibration.
3
votes
6answers
588 views

“Have some reason you” or “Have some reason why you”

Can the "why" be removed from the phrase "have some reason why you?" Example: Do you have some reason you ____? vs. Do you have some reason why you ____? Are these both grammatically ...
3
votes
1answer
116 views

Why do people say “Go down this road” or “Go down this corridor” instead of saying “Go straight” [closed]

I was wondering, when giving directions, is it correct to say "go straight" instead of "go down"? Does down and straight in the context of giving directions mean the same thing?
1
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2answers
2k views

“My interest in becoming” vs. “my interest to become”

I was writing a letter of application for a university. I wanted to start my letter by writing: I am writing this letter to express my interest in becoming part... and then I got confused. I am ...
11
votes
9answers
11k views

Is “non-vegetarian” a correct word?

I've heard that the words "non-veg" and "non-vegetarian" are not legal English words (i.e aren't in the dictionary). Is this true? If so, what is the right way to say that something contains ...
0
votes
1answer
70 views

Which one is the correct dialogue punctuation format? [closed]

I am writing my first novel and this the very first confusion I would like to clarify. As I am not a native English speaker, I find it very hard to understand the punctuation scheme in direct ...
3
votes
4answers
549 views

Past tense of “to cast” in the programming sense

In programming, to cast (also: to typecast) means to convert an object from one type to another (see Wikipedia). I'd like to know the correct past tense of to cast in this sense. Is it cast or ...
5
votes
3answers
13k views

“Exchanged with” vs. “exchanged for”

Is "exchanged with" grammatically correct and does it mean the same thing as "exchanged for?" "For" and "with" don't normally seem interchangeable, so these two phrases should be different, yet they ...
2
votes
3answers
2k views

“Cash on me” vs. “cash with me”

I know you would normally say, "I don't have any cash on me". But would it be grammatically correct to say, "I don't have any cash with me"?
1
vote
1answer
59 views

Should I use a comma before the conjunction in this sentence? [duplicate]

The sentence The movie was loud and the chatter was louder. Should I need to add a comma before the and that joins the first sentence The movie was loud and the independent clause the chatter ...
0
votes
2answers
1k views

Should I place “me” and “I” in the same sentence?

I'm helping my stepdaughter write a cover letter and we are at odds as to whether this sentence is structurally and grammatically correct. My experience in customer service qualifies me for this ...
2
votes
1answer
217 views

Is this sentence missing a verb?

This quote comes from an article published online at USA Today, but it strikes me as odd and not correct. Am I right, or do I misunderstand the sentence? Obama stopped short of saying how high up ...
2
votes
3answers
104 views

Can I say : “He was made broke”?

He doesn't have any money. He was made broke in 1999. Is it grammatically correct to use this structure?
-1
votes
1answer
52 views

What would you do if I told you+subordinate clause

there are a couple of sentences that I have been having trouble with lately. I'll start with an example: I'd be lying if I said I have never considered moving.(referring to the present) That's how ...
6
votes
2answers
381 views

Is it appropriate to use “it's” as a contraction for “it is” here?

I saw this in an English text, and I was wondering if the "it's" here is used correctly: The morality of it’s debatable but you can ... I would be inclined to write it as: The morality of it ...
1
vote
2answers
257 views

“had initially” vs. “initially had” [closed]

As in: I initially had planned to cite my sources. Rather than: I had initially planned to cite my sources.
2
votes
4answers
3k views

“This was the fastest I heard someone [respond/responded]” - which to use, and why?

Here are the two sentences. This was the fastest I heard someone responded. This was the fastest I heard someone respond. Can someone help me understand: A) Which one is correct, and what is ...
5
votes
2answers
2k views

Referring to oneself and another person at the start of a sentence

Me and Larry had a meeting today. Larry and me had a meeting today. I and Larry had a meeting today. Larry and I had a meeting today. I know the third one is wrong (because it doesn't ...
-2
votes
2answers
394 views

Preposition use: “at the gate,” “among the crowded place”

He is standing at the gate. He is standing among the crowded place. If both are wrong what is the right usage?
3
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3answers
1k views

“For [verb]ing” vs “to [verb]”

Someone edited my message on StackOverflow, but it really bugs me out. I'm not sure what's wrong with it: As you see, the bigger the circle becomes, the more vertices I need for hiding the straight ...
2
votes
3answers
204 views

Unfamiliar construction from Nineteen Eighty-Four: “…had been used to gather there…”

Why is this sentence correct? The old, discredited leaders of the Party had been used to gather there before they were finally purged. The "had been used to" part troubles me. Shouldn't it be ...
-4
votes
2answers
938 views

“If I didn't have” vs. “if I had not had” for a hypothetical

I wrote: it would never have been possible if i didn't have interest in the least bit but a friend of mine told it is wrong and should be: it would never have been possible if i had not ...
-1
votes
1answer
461 views

“Wasn't” vs. “weren't” in a vernacular sentence

I ain't heard no word to let me know you wasn't just eating hay. Should the wasn't be weren't?
0
votes
4answers
424 views

“You” as an indefinite pronoun in a first-person statement

But like most young people of my generation, waking up 6 am in the morning to study things you do not understand, is not an idea that appeals to me Is my usage of 'you' in this context wrong? ...
-2
votes
3answers
12k views

Why is “I’m doing great” correct?

"I'm doing great" appears to be incorrect (to me) because 'great' can be used as an adjective. I would think that it should be: "I'm doing (adverb)." Why is it actually correct to say "I'm doing ...
1
vote
2answers
285 views

What do you say to wish your fellows a good lunch? [duplicate]

It's lunch time, you joined a table with people, you are about to start eating, but just a moment before you do so, you want to wish everyone a good lunch. If they were French you would say: Bon ...
0
votes
0answers
44 views

Is there a reason for omitting “it” in: “As is usually seen”?

As is usually seen in such mass tragedies Why can't I say "As it is usually seen"
1
vote
1answer
85 views

Grammaticality of “If to speak about” [duplicate]

I was wondering if it is correct to use the expression if to speak about. For example, suppose we wanted talk about one subject and then change it to another one: These are very dangerous ...
1
vote
3answers
81 views

Why should a copula link two noun phrases of the same case?

http://english.stackexchange.com/a/30392/50720 motivated this question: To quote from the clear explanation: The rule for what [Fowler] and others consider technically right is ... that ...
3
votes
3answers
14k views

“In the market” or “on the market”

I am trying to help a friend of mine proofreading an English email and she has a preposition there that I am not completely certain is correct. The original sentence was this: [Name of the ...
0
votes
0answers
57 views

A question on the use of 'since'.

'Since' means throughout the period from a specified point in past time to the present. Can I use it to mean 'throughout the period from a specified point in past time to a specific point also in the ...
1
vote
1answer
79 views

What does the phrase 'much the most" mean?

Is it really a phrase? I found it in Tom Sawyer - "...and the most hospitable and much the most lavish in the matter of festivities that St Petersburg could boast..."
1
vote
1answer
617 views

Is it “as wonderful as them” or “as wonderful as they”? [duplicate]

I have a few questions on terminology, first, actually, as having the right terminology may have enabled me to answer this question on my own. What is the terminology for such constructs, "as ...
3
votes
5answers
7k views

Are double negatives proper English (e.g. “I don't know nothing”)?

I have heard many (rather most) people, especially in the USA, saying: I don't know nothing about it. Is that correct? I always get a weird feeling hearing this and feel the correct one would ...
-1
votes
1answer
42 views

“Diameter is” versus “Diameters are” [closed]

Which one is correct? In [7] the diameter of Cayley graphs on Sn is calculated. In [7] the diameters of Cayley graphs on Sn are calculated.
0
votes
2answers
650 views

Question tag for a sentence of future tense

For a sentence of future tense, one containing a form of the verb "be", should the question tag include that form of "be"? Example: Which sentence is correct? I would be in the city, wouldn't I ...
0
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2answers
74 views

I need a word to describe a person who seeks information for other people?

Im looking for another word to call a person who seeks and finds information for others.
1
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2answers
116 views

“Among his team” or “among his team members”

Would it be correct to say "to disсuss among his team"? Can we use "among" with collective noun (team, group, committee, etc) if they are in singular form? Or "among" always must be followed by plural ...
0
votes
1answer
57 views

Is the statement grammatically correct? [closed]

Is the bold part of the following statement grammatically correct? Let $A$ be the set of all cycles in $B$ which their lengths are congruent to $i$ modulo 7.
0
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2answers
66 views
-1
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1answer
42 views

“Under one year old” versus “Less than one year old”

Which is correct: Amy has a child under a year old Amy has a child less than a year old
-3
votes
1answer
41 views

is this sentence right [closed]

"nothing cannot be fix in 0 seconds so result is no fix" Is this sentence right in the way of grammaticality and meaning
9
votes
3answers
7k views

Is it proper to have consecutive adverbs?

Is it proper grammar to have consecutive adverbs in a sentence? e.g. "It was not exactly accidentally.... My thought is that is probably is not proper, especially in this case. The above could have ...
3
votes
1answer
67 views

simultaneous dialogue [closed]

[[The question has been edited in an attempt to address the reason it was originally put on hold.]] Suppose that several individuals are speaking. There are two conversations occurring at once in the ...
3
votes
3answers
64 views

Is this sentence using relative clauses correct grammatically? [closed]

The winner of the competition is the person who gets the cheese first, which is the prize.
0
votes
2answers
374 views

Let me confirm your name. Is this sentence grammatically correct? [closed]

While you are on a customer service call, how would you clarify the name? Is it grammatically correct to say, " let me confirm your name".
3
votes
1answer
260 views

“A mice problem” vs. “a mouse problem”

My friend said to me one day: "We have a mice problem at UNI". Is "a mice problem" grammatical as opposed to "a mouse problem"?
13
votes
8answers
6k views

“I'm lovin' it”

How normal-sounding is the slogan "I'm lovin' it" to native ears? I know it sounded quite odd to me when I first heard it — and it still sometimes does —, but I can't even tell why. Sure, love is ...