Grammaticality refers to whether something obeys the rules of grammar for English.

learn more… | top users | synonyms (2)

0
votes
1answer
102 views

How old are you? or What is your age? [closed]

Which is more common or used more and also the correct way of asking?
5
votes
1answer
189 views

The grammar behind 'above mentioned'

A colleague of mine wrote the following sentence: I have worked on the below mentioned issues: Now, I'm not a native speaker, and certainly not an authority on grammar. I construct sentences ...
1
vote
1answer
73 views

In what (semantic) context might “REFUSE” be used with a gerund complement?

I know that, prescriptively speaking, that the verb "refuse" is supposed to be followed by an infinitive. For example: The parents refused to buy the dangerous toy for their kid. Since language ...
3
votes
2answers
84 views

Is “switched” always used as a verb?

I was thinking that the word switched could be used as a noun and maybe an adjective too but I might just be making grammar mistakes. Switched in the dictionary only shows up as being a verb! Here ...
0
votes
0answers
8 views

Using past tense for retelling events, even though the logic behind the decisions made is still valid [duplicate]

This is related to this question about using past tense when speaking of something that was observed in the past, but you know it still is the same. What if you're talking about a generally held ...
1
vote
1answer
70 views

“Informing” — Gerund instead of Verb+Object?

I think if we take informing as a noun in this sentence, it should be fine. What are your views on the grammaticality of the following sentence? He left me without informing.
0
votes
2answers
22 views

“Things are N1, N2, N3” or “Things are with N1, N2, N3”?

I wrote a sentence in my article: The most important things are: practicability, simplicity however my friend told me that the sentence should be: The most important things are with ...
-1
votes
1answer
28 views

Is 'it' redundant in '… which God hath ordained it' ? (1899 UK)

I was reading this which linked to Prof Lawler's PDF. I thought to try the Matriculation examination in 1899 just (on p 6 of 6) to test the littleness of my linguistic knowledge: 10. "To make a ...
0
votes
1answer
92 views

using are to name but a few

In a very formal writing style, Is it fine to use to name but a few in a separate sentence? There are a lot of algorithms to do hashing. MD5, SHA1 and CRC are to name but a few.
0
votes
1answer
63 views

Position of adverb with respect to the adjective it modifies [closed]

The arm was so badly injured (a) that he must have (b) it amputated (c). Which part of this sentence has an error? Should it be "The arm was injured so badly." Is that right?
1
vote
1answer
88 views

Is the “B” in Brussels Sprouts capitalized? [closed]

It's not standard to capitalize "F" in french fries... In that case what is the proper way to write it?
2
votes
1answer
37 views

object or complement confusion?

In this sentence: He is going to school. is the word "school" an object or complement? My confusion arises from the dual observations that: (a) it apparently can not be object, because the verb ...
0
votes
1answer
61 views

a path to v+ing / a path to + verb

Which one is grammatically correct? an auspicious path to fighting against rape. an auspicious path to fight rape. or maybe an auspicious path towards the fight against rape ...
0
votes
4answers
90 views

Alternative for “couldn't not help”?

Given a sentence like: I couldn’t not help him right? I was wondering if that sentence was grammatically correct, and even if it is, what better way is there to rephrase it? Because as it ...
-1
votes
1answer
60 views

Can you be metaphorically abrasive to something?

I just made the statement: I’m abrasive to poetry. And I was told that it’s not grammatically correct. Does it make sense?
0
votes
1answer
38 views

'develop' or 'developing' [closed]

Here are my constructions: He has the ability to develop policies, procedures and solutions that improve network disaster recovery and business continuity. He has the ability to developing ...
0
votes
1answer
44 views

Problem with sentences structures [closed]

I have problem with sentences structures. I have sentences: He possesses wide span of skills and specialized knowledge in design, implementation, management, and maintenance a fully ...
0
votes
2answers
36 views

can use neither and not together? [closed]

The price estimates include both state and national taxes, neither not delivery charges. Is this corrected? I know 'neither' and 'not' can't use together.
4
votes
1answer
155 views

Why not 'somewhy'?

When I originally wrote this ELL question, I used 'somewhy' instead of 'for some reason' for want of concision. Only afterwards, a user kindly advised that 'somewhy' obsolesced. But why? Google led ...
1
vote
2answers
85 views

Are my friend vs. are my friends? [closed]

Which one of the following is correct and why? You both are my friend. or You both are my friends.
21
votes
7answers
7k views

Is “He is risen” Correct?

This is not correct, right? Mixing present tense and past tense makes me think it is not correct but I see it so often on signs that I'm not even sure any more. Is there a specific reason why it's ...
2
votes
1answer
77 views

“Twice (adj.)-er” vs. “two times (adj.)-er” vs. “twice/two times as (adj.) as”

Suppose we are comparing a particular characteristic (that takes comparative -er) of two items, A and B. Compared to B, A displays double that characteristic. There are multiple ways we can express ...
0
votes
5answers
445 views

“There's no point” vs. “it's no point”

I came across this English test question: You aren't allowed to use your mobile so ________. it's no point in leaving it on [my answer] there's no point in leaving it on [correct ...
0
votes
0answers
31 views

Using “well” to start a sentence [duplicate]

What does "well" mean when used to start a sentence. Examples: "Well I never like going to the store with my aunt" "Well its still better than cooking onions"
0
votes
2answers
58 views

Do I need a determining pronoun if it can be implied?

It’s the hour at which they usually go out for their daily walk or It’s the hour they usually go out for their daily walk
1
vote
0answers
33 views

Usage of “Only” and “Comma” [closed]

I was wondering if these sentences are correct ; Only then did she realize the stress he was under. (o) What if we add a comma in this sentence? Only then, did she realize the stress he was ...
-2
votes
3answers
61 views

The use of “Their” [duplicate]

I saw on facebook recently where its states and individuals birthday for all to see and comment the use of "their", which seemed inappropriate to me. Upon further investigation on my singular male ...
0
votes
2answers
65 views

“Making Do” or “Make Do”? [closed]

Consider the following sentence At present, I'm making do with what I have Though it tells you what I'm trying to convey, something feels funny about the phrase "making do". Is it grammatically ...
0
votes
2answers
118 views

What do you call the grammatical element that describes the state of being of the subject?

Suppose we have these sentences: 1. Smiling, she offered me a hot cup of chocolate. 2. Busy finishing my homework, I have no time to even think about video games. 3. Knowing there's little change of ...
-1
votes
1answer
151 views

what to use: Them or it? [closed]

Question about the phrase: please, could you fill out 3 documents in attachment and send them (or it?) to me Thank you in advance!
1
vote
2answers
54 views

To have ALL + adjective + noun

I am wondering whether the sentence That school has all smart students is a valid alternative to All the students of that school are smart. Is it idiomatic/grammatically sound? (Let's ...
-1
votes
1answer
45 views

Which is more grammatically correct; [closed]

Which is more grammatically correct - a guide to things to do or a guide of things to do?
3
votes
5answers
186 views

Is “He should be consequenced” an error?

I've been watching The Sopranos recently; a very useful vehicle for picking up American pronunciation and mob slang. In series one, episode seven, Tony Soprano and his wife Carmela are in the school ...
0
votes
1answer
119 views

What Do You Call It when a Noun is Used as a Verb?

Like "Petition": I signed a 'petition,' and carried it onward to 'petition' for support of lower wages & more suffering etc.
-1
votes
3answers
41 views

Is a verb pattern possible [closed]

Is this sentence correct: The teacher told every single one of the pupils rewrite their essays.
0
votes
1answer
140 views

Is it correct to shorten “you have” to “you've”? [closed]

If "you are" can be shortened to "you're", can "you have" be shortened to "you've"? Is it acceptable? If yes, what are the situations where it can be used?
0
votes
1answer
76 views

'For while …, yet …' : Right quantity and use of conjunctions?

For while the capacity to overcome all opposing sensible impulses can and must be simply presupposed in man on account of his freedom, yet this capacity as strength is something he must acquire. ...
-2
votes
2answers
114 views

“It's a long time that” - correct or not?

I recently used the following phrasing in an fictional informal dialogue: It's a long time that I did this. Someone (a native speaker of English) corrected me and told me that I should use ...
2
votes
3answers
76 views

Should I use Singular or Plural for “Donor(s) List”? [duplicate]

To be recognized in the Saddle River Donors List and help the Saddle River community, please include your tax free donation: Should it be Donors or Donor?
2
votes
2answers
66 views

Do both sides of the conjunction need to align with the next part of the sentence?

If someone can improve my title, please do. I seem to be missing some vocabulary. I was writing an SO answer and ran into something that has always bothered me. Consider the following sentence: ...
1
vote
1answer
79 views

to- infinitive: Is it correct to say or ask…? [closed]

Is it correct to say or ask: What is a rich man to do with no light in his eyes? (meaning: What is it that a depressive rich man can do?) What is a rich man to do but hide? (meaning: ...
2
votes
1answer
218 views

What does “#Race together” mean? Is this a perfect English sentence?

Starbucks decided to stop their baristas writing “Race together” on customers’ cups in response to raging public criticism. Totally apart from political, social, or racial dispute involved in this ...
-1
votes
2answers
61 views

“may you” or “can you”? [closed]

Which is correct? Can you please fax me the document? May you please fax me the document?
1
vote
1answer
181 views

Is English considered easier to learn than most of the other languages in the world? [closed]

In comparison to the other languages, I think English is much more simpler. For example, compared to French, English nouns have no gender, adjectives have only one form and verbs have extremely simple ...
0
votes
1answer
113 views

Is using a sentence as a subject grammatically correct?

For example: Attack them directly won't do anything "Attack them directly" is a partial sentence. In this sentence, we treat that whole phrase as a subject and make a sentence from the phrase. ...
0
votes
1answer
116 views

Would it be 'meet' or 'have met' in this structure?

If I bumped into someone, who happened to be called John, yesterday, and I am telling someone else of the encounter, would I say: I happened to meet John yesterday. or I happened to have ...
4
votes
1answer
156 views

How do you say if something is as hard as something else?

Today I wanted to tell that buying a car for me is as hard as choosing a dish in a restaurant and I actually meant that I am picky on buying a car just like my eating habit. But I stuck in the middle ...
0
votes
1answer
88 views

Which one is the correct dialogue punctuation format? [closed]

I am writing my first novel and this the very first confusion I would like to clarify. As I am not a native English speaker, I find it very hard to understand the punctuation scheme in direct ...
3
votes
1answer
138 views

Why do people say “Go down this road” or “Go down this corridor” instead of saying “Go straight” [closed]

I was wondering, when giving directions, is it correct to say "go straight" instead of "go down"? Does down and straight in the context of giving directions mean the same thing?
1
vote
1answer
66 views

Should I use a comma before the conjunction in this sentence? [duplicate]

The sentence The movie was loud and the chatter was louder. Should I need to add a comma before the and that joins the first sentence The movie was loud and the independent clause the chatter ...