Grammaticality refers to whether something obeys the rules of grammar in English. If your question is about grammar itself, please use the "grammar" tag.

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357 views

“Hundred-thousands” or “Hundreds of thousands”? [closed]

Which word choice is correct? The company saved several hundred-thousands of dollars. or The company saved several hundreds of thousands of dollars.
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2answers
50 views

Into vs. in to question

Which is correct: "Dive right in to why you're involved" or "Dive right into why you're involved" My guess is that the first is correct, since "in" is a part of "dive right in" and should be ...
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1answer
44 views

Is this sentence grammatically correct - subject verb aggreement?

Is this sentence grammatically correct? "The charge nurse would call the patient back from the waiting room and escort them to an empty exam room" Call the patient... escort them??
2
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1answer
272 views

Cost vs. Costs when to use [closed]

When do we use cost and costs in a sentence? Like for instance in this sentence.. "Secrets have their costs or secrets have their cost?"
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2answers
111 views

Is it correct to write 40+ in a sentence?

If the amount of something, let's say locations, has a minimum of 40 but fluctuates to up randomly, can 40+ be used? Would "around 40," "about 40" or something similar be more appropriate for a formal ...
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0answers
241 views

“Proper ” contraction of 'because'

I got into it with a buddy of mine over how one would write out the oft spoken contraction of because. He is steadfast on 'cause, but this struck me as unnecessarily jarring as it isn't spoken this ...
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1answer
46 views

“One such type of knowledge can be that the problem” vs “One example of such knowledge is a problem”

I have a paragraph that starts with the following In order to obtain a more accurate result, additional knowledge is required. My next line is as follows but it doesn't feel right... One ...
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0answers
23 views

Distributive property of 'and' for a set

If I did 'x' for two years and then did 'y' for one year, can I correctly say that I did 'x' and 'y' for 3 years? Or would that be false since I hadn't done 'y' for more than one year? Would it be ...
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0answers
67 views

Does this sentence make grammatical sense?

Here is a sentence from an article about drug discovery : "Nowadays, drug targets and disease mechanisms twisted empiric drug discovery to rational drug design programs." I think the point the ...
2
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1answer
889 views

Which is correct? …as from today or from today onwards [closed]

I have a water filter in my office. It is broken. I wrote a reminder telling the staff. The word I would like to highlight is "as from" or "from." Water filter can only be used as from 1st March,...
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4answers
116 views

Questions on “Like father, like son” [duplicate]

I have a few questions on this phrase "Like father, like son". Is it an idiom or a proverb? Or both? Can it be analysed grammatically? If the answer is "Yes", can you analyse it grammatically for me?...
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1answer
73 views

unassigned vs non-assigned

We are developing modules in a ticket assignment system and most of the labels are in French. Someone has translated the label for unassigned tickets to "Non-Assigned" in English. I'm not sure this ...
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2answers
657 views

“May you please give me your approval?”

The phrase is bring used in our office, and while I am certain it doesn't sound right, ie shouldn't it say "Would/could/will you please give me your approval" I would like an expert to tell me why.
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6answers
2k views

Would 'sitting in a queue' be incorrect English?

Usually, to avoid any ambiguities, I'd say 'waiting in the queue', however I came across 'sitting in a queue' and wanted to know whether it's correct or incorrect English. Is it used? And if yes, in ...
1
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1answer
72 views

Is this a grammatical sentence?

One of my students wrote a sentence, shown hereunder in italics, and I can't seem to able to tell if it is correct or not? Andrew has thought good of creating some company and setting it up abroad. ...
1
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1answer
95 views

Is the line “Bush never quit figured out how to deal with him, and finished well behind him“grammatically right? [closed]

There was the following passage in Time magazine’s (February 20) article titled, “Watch Jeb Bush’s saddest campaign moments”: Jeb Bush’s campaign has fallen short of expectations. At one time the ...
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2answers
173 views

I have a bodyguard in order to protect myself

I have a bodyguard in order to protect myself. I was told that I cannot have a stative verb in the required condition: I have a bodyguard But I don't understand how "I need to study in order ...
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1answer
46 views

Is this correct? : “Tenji that was, died in his sisters arms.” (Kind of like 'powers that be') Also is 'have a claim to' correct' or 'hold a claim to'

Full quote for context "I have no claim to life, yet I walk. I have no claim to valor, yet I fight. I have no claim to love, yet I mourn. I am not the dragon, for Tenji Minamoto that was, died in his ...
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0answers
23 views

Countable and uncountable nouns [duplicate]

Is it correct to write: "Dreams become a reality? or is it better to write: Dreams become reality?
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3answers
127 views

“Me knowing that he was… ” Is “me” the subject?

"That was it," he told me. "Laughing at me behind their faces, about a woman. Me knowing that he was up there, and them knowing I knew that if I busted in and dragged him out and bashed his head ...
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2answers
63 views

Whose sunshine do you belong to? [closed]

Are these sentences grammatically correct? They are translated from Thai song lyrics. Whose sunshine do you belong to? Who is your sunflower?
0
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1answer
43 views

“So must the X be” vs “So must be the X” vs Neither [duplicate]

I am not sure whether either of the following sentences (in quotations) are grammatically correct. They both sound awkward to me. Is anyone able to judge whether they are? "Since the latter is large, ...
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7answers
563 views

Not only… but also

Is this sentence grammatically correct? He doesn't only like football but also likes tennis. and if it's wrong, why so? Specifically, is there any problem with omitting the subject in the ...
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2answers
47 views

Can I list countable nouns to be done after “do much”?

Examples: I can't do much for that. There is too much to be done. At first I assumed there is an omitted noun after "much"? But the possible applicable nouns I knew, such as "works", or "anti-...
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0answers
74 views

How to drop a pronoun? (pronoun-dropping/removing 'I'/omitting the subject)

I wrote resume and got stuck in this place. There are recommendations to write your achievements in the short form (without "I"): "Worked with ... " "Created something ... " "Collaborated with ... "...
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2answers
76 views

What does “I feel friendly” mean?

If I want to express the feeling that other people are very friendly to me, what is the proper way to say it? Is it okay to say:"I feel you are very friendly"? Is there any better way to say so? ...
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1answer
73 views

“Like … also”

First off, I would like to apologise if this has been asked before - I did do a search on here, but there were far too many results to go through! Take for example this sentence: Like you, I also ...
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2answers
73 views

“would like to see being removed” or “would like to be seen removed”? [closed]

Let's say I let a room to a person and offer this person to remove stuff from this room if necessary. Could I say "Please let me know if there is something you would like to see being removed" or "...
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1answer
61 views

for + period of time + present continuous/past perfect tense [closed]

What is the difference between (1) I've taken antibiotics for 10 weeks. (2) I've been taking antibiotics for 10 weeks. (3) I'm taking antibiotics for 10 weeks. (4) I take antibiotics for 10 weeks. (5)...
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1answer
74 views

why do we use 'prepared' in a sentence like this [closed]

The sentence below says something that's yet to happen, but the word prepared is in the past tense. Any suggestions on what to read to understand this will highly be appreciated. Thank you. Always ...
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0answers
47 views

Correct way to use capitalization for undergraduate degree [duplicate]

In writing about a persons college degree achievements I'm confused over capitalization. Any thoughts or inputs would be greatly appreciated. Here goes, should I write... He/She earned a Bachelor of ...
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2answers
108 views

Is “I like how when + phrase” correct?

Is the following sentence grammatically correct? I like how when Katy asked "Is everything okay?", Lilly asked "Is it not?".
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4answers
86 views

Is “cemetery gaits” grammatically correct?

There is a song with the following lyrics: "You know us by the way we crawl and you know us by our cemetery gaits" The part I'd like to ask about is 'cemetery gaits'. I love the lyric and am having ...
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1answer
33 views

Subject / verb agreement [closed]

None of the boys play / plays on the team. Each of us want/ wants to have a piece of the pie.
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2answers
103 views

Using partially redundant phrases such as “blatantly obvious” in a sentence for emphasis

Would it be grammatically correct to use phrases like blatantly obvious or hugely massive in a sentence? The words themselves have different enough meanings that I would think it is okay.
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0answers
37 views

Introduction to potential employer

Is this the proper way to introduce myself to a prospective employer? "My Great Uncle, Joe Smith, has spoken with you about my interest in entering the healthcare industry. I would like to set up a ...
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2answers
97 views

What is the grammatical construction behind the word “climbing” in the phrase “climbing wall” or the word “running” in the phrase “running” shoes?

I am curious about the grammar behind the word "climbing" in the phrase "climbing wall" (or the word "running" in the phrase "running shoes," etc). I first thought it was an adjective describing the ...
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0answers
61 views

Is WHO an acronym or an initialism? [duplicate]

Is WHO (the World Health Organization) usually treated as an acronym without a definite article, or as an initialism with a definite article? I have seen both, but with the initialism usage ...
3
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2answers
85 views

Is it valid to say 'in the presence of something' [closed]

The title I chose for my thesis is: Finding Synapses in Data in the Presence of Artifacts I think this is bad language and am unhappy with it but I am not a native speaker. I want to convey ...
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3answers
125 views

Definite article before “media”

Should this question use the definite article before "media"? Does the media influence us? Does media influence us? Are these both OK? I have seen both being used.
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1answer
70 views

use something to do something (with)

Surely it is not quite ethical but is it grammatical to say: "I am going to use this stick to hit you." vs "I am going to use this stick to hit you with." (excuse my ending the sentence with a ...
2
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1answer
58 views

Why is “that” preceded by a comma in this relative clause? What does it mean?

As you know, there are two types of relative clause: Type 1 The woman who lives next door is a doctor. In this example,the relative clause tells us which person or thing (or what kind of ...
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2answers
57 views

What is the meaning of the phrase “Those who”?

There is a question asking a student to fill in the word. Heaven helps those ( ) help themselves. The answer is "who" Is this "who" is a relative pronoun? What is the meaning of this word?
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2answers
122 views

Is “I will sleep you to bed” grammatically correct? [closed]

Like we use "I will walk the dog to the park", is using "I will sleep you to bed" grammatically correct?
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2answers
93 views

Should I use who or whom? [duplicate]

This is part of my sentence (for an essay): "For example, Kate- the Governor's sister, who/whom was later executed-...." Should I use who or whom in this situation?
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3answers
63 views

“10 years in” vs. “In 10 years”

I read a headline: "10 years in, something happens". Is that grammatically correct or incorrect to give that headline? Any difference with "In 10 years, something happens"?
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2answers
295 views

Is writing “wishing you the best of health” at end of a letter considered a sentence fragment? [closed]

Is writing "wishing you the best of health" at end of a letter considered a sentence fragment?
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2answers
106 views

The more and the lesser [closed]

The more you learn, the lesser mistakes you make. Is this sentence grammatically correct? Can lesser be used to refer to the quality of the mistake?
3
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2answers
82 views

Is the “are” this sentence correct? [duplicate]

The following sentence sounds incorrect to me when read aloud. "Eating and playing like the locals are important for enjoying the festive atmosphere." I tried diagramming it and am clear on the "are"...
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0answers
61 views

Why is there no comma between this participle phrase and the main clause

I searched around, and they said that all the participle phrases are happening concurrently with the main clause. Hm, I thought they are consecutively happening, according to http://random-idea-...