Grammaticality refers to whether something obeys the rules of grammar for English.

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Was conversing or conversed

Should it be: 1: As I was conversing with him about his love for jazz, I measured the temperature and found it to be 100 degrees. 2: As I conversed with him about his love for jazz, I measured the ...
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Give it me! Write me! [duplicate]

Our young grandson, who is a Mancunian, says 'give it me', and 'give it me back', which is a northern British standard. It made me think that it is not only northerners who omit the indirect object ...
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which is better, that that or that [duplicate]

Which is better, "Bob knows that that is wrong" or "Bob knows that is wrong"? It seems to me that the first "that" is acting as the relation between Bob and the thing that is wrong, while the second ...
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Is the phrase “man is mortal” grammatically correct?

Or, must it be "Every man is mortal"? How about "Tree is mortal"? In another sense, "A detailed description of a man", "A detailed description of man" or "A detailed description of Man"?
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I need another phrase to replace “to be a part of helping the program grow.” [closed]

I have great passion and love for the Music Program and would love to continue to be a part of helping the program grow.
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Is there some rule against ending a sentence with the contraction “it's”?

I heard this lyric in a song the other day and it just sounded so wrong that I assumed it must be incorrect grammar, but I can't find any specific prohibition that applies. That's what it's. ...
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Slightly chance of something

On multiple occasions I heard the phrase slightly chance of something (e.g. rain). This sounds wrong as slightly is an adverb. Googling returns only few instances. Is it acceptable to use this in ...
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Usage of the term “second cousin” in a formal setting

I am trying to write an engraving message for a Christening gift. I have been asked to be a Godfather of my cousin's son. I ideally want to put "from your Godfather and second cousin" in the message, ...
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Usage of 'will' twice in a sentence

Is the sentence 'The student who will score the maximum marks will win a prize' correct?
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“Is used” vs. “has been used” vs. “was used”

I have three sentences of which I'm not sure which one is grammatical, and why. It refers to the Eiffel Tower. It is used as the symbol of Paris and of France for over a century. It was ...
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A or An in “a (relatively) obscure meaning”?

I've just come across this sentence here at "english.stackexchange.com". "The writer should have taken care not to hide such a (relatively) obscure meaning underneath an obviously silly one." ...
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Why (so) sure? vs How (so) sure?

I just answered a question on ELL.SE that made me (and the OP) wonder about something... Consider the following four question responses to these two statements: 1- "I know I'll marry young." ...
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“Heard me [infinitive]” vs. “heard me [present participle]”

"Heard me [infinitive]" vs. "heard me [present participle]" At that time, you wouldn't have heard me talk about it. At that time, you wouldn't have heard me talking about it. At ...
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Outward vs Out-swing door

I am curious what the proper use of language is when your talking about doors. Should a door that swings out be called "Out-swing door" or "Outward swing door"? I'm not sure if there is a proper use ...
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Is “and with” grammatical in this sentence?

We have registered nurses working on site with a nutritional background to provide weight loss advice to clients and with at least a 2 year working experience. Is the part in bold grammatical?
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The clock (has kept/kept) precise time for over forty years? [closed]

The correct answer is "kept" but I don't understand why because shouldn't "over forty years" make it past progressive? This is from an ACT practice test. The passage talks about a guy making the ...
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“Champing on the bit”

I read recently that was describing a cavalry, full of "horses champing on their bits, eager to rush forwards into the fray." I have always known it as "chomping". Is "champing" a typo? Is "chomping" ...
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Why is this sentence correct?

Why is this sentence correct? The old, discredited leaders of the Party had been used to gather there before they were finally purged. The "had been used to" part troubles me. Shouldn't it be ...
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“Are” vs. “is” with compound subjects

How are the wife and kid? How is the wife and kid? Which is more correct?
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Using term “shot dead”

I'm curious about newscasters using the term "shot dead" in describing the death of a gun shot victim. Is this correct? They would never describe a survivor as "shot live".
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Shouldn't “the exact same” always be “exactly the same”?

I've always avoided using the common phrase "the exact same" because it sounds incorrect to me (unless perhaps a comma were inserted thus: "the exact, same".) Shouldn't "the exact same" be "exactly ...
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Which is correct: “with regards to,” “in regards with,” “regarding”?

I have been using the following phrases but I am still not confident that they are grammatically correct and sound right: "in regards with something" "with regards to something" "regarding ...
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Question about grammatical name and its function

What is the grammatical name given to, and the function of, the part of the sentence below in bold? Maneuvring a tanker is likewise a daunting challenge.
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Contact back to somebody?

Here is the scenario. A colleague who is working remotely is working on a review of my design for some work item. We came up with a comment several weeks ago but I just haven't got a chance to update ...
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Can “mode” be used as “mean” and “median” are?

It'd be normal to hear sentences like these: The mean ticket price for the concert was $56.50. The median ticket price for the concert was $61. But what about: The mode ticket price for ...
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Shortest correct sentence in English- use of contractions [duplicate]

I often hear people saying that "I am" is the shortest sentence in the English language. I know that there are also discussions about sentences using the imperative mood such as "Go." that would be ...
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If and would construction

If I do all this, I would have such a story to tell. Is this sentence wrong? I've searched it up and it's wrong according to grammar guides -- but I've seen it so often. The would is supposed to ...
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“By when you want it completed” vs. “when you want it completed by”

Which of the following is grammatical? Can you please let me know by when you want it completed. Can you please let me know when you want it completed by. I am preferring the latter, but ...
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Be talking something? [closed]

First of all, I'm not native. I've heard this expression in some movies, I believe, and I'm wondering whether it's correct (or maybe I just thought I heard this and I'm mistaken). Can you say "be ...
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135 views

Late Night vs Early Morning [duplicate]

Can anyone explain me Difference between late night & early morning ? "I slept early morning".Is this sentence correct ? What time is called morning ? After 12:00 AM ?
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“Let A be a set, [let] B [be] a group”

Math proves often start with "let". For example: Let A be a set. This is easy. But what about introducing several things in that manner? Let A be a set, B be a group, and C be a number. ...
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“As” vs “because of” [closed]

I am a little bit confused in meaning of "as" and "because of". there are two sentences: I felt tired today as I worked hard yesterday. I felt tired because of I worked hard yesterday or I felt ...
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“Whether or not” vs. “whether”

This will depend on whether he's suitable for the job. This will depend on whether he's suitable for the job or not. This will depend on whether or not he's suitable for the job. ...
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“Inputted” or “input”

I have used the word inputted in an assignment and am being forced to change it to input. However, both the Oxford English Dictionary (I am in New Zealand so this is most relevant) and MS Word list ...
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Is “aren't I” correct grammar?

Since "amn't I" is so clunky, is "aren't I" grammatically correct? Or is the only way to say this "Am I not"?
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Grammaticality of “the” in “I am going to the Asda later”

A friend of mine and I are having a long standing debate about the correctness of a sentence. Informing me what he was doing later that day he said: I am going to the Asda later. Note: To ...
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Does a helping verb have to be followed by the main verb to form a complete sentence?

A friend wrote: "I just feel that now is a good time to reiterate that pluralization does not require an apostrophe." In reply I wrote: Sometimes it does. "Mind your Ps and Qs" doesn't need ...
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Is it “a uniform” or “an uniform”? [duplicate]

On a Physics specification, it says: 6.7 Know how to use two permanent magnets to produce a uniform magnetic field pattern. Isn't it "produce an uniform magnetic field", or is the existing ...
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“More” used in front of “happy” [duplicate]

Is it ever wrong to use the word "more" in front of an adjective? For example, is the following sentence grammatically incorrect: "I am more happy when I am reading poetry"?
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Controversy over verb choice in “neither you nor I {is/am/are} in control”

I was watching the film A Game of Shadows starring Robert Downey Junior and Jude law when this line came up, "...neither you nor I is in control..." (I can’t remember the exact words that ended the ...
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Is “Have we a menu?” a correct sentence?

Is this a correct sentence? Have we a menu? It sounds a little bit strange to me.
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What rules make “Remember me, who am your friend” grammatical?

An acquaintance recalled this specific example from an English textbook, but it is jarring to my native ear. Is this an example of prescriptive grammarians gone wild?
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I can't not be pregnant

This is a quote from a Gwyneth Paltrow interview where she talks about her miscarriage: "It was awful," she told the Daily Mail's You magazine. "It happened really late, and I wasn't expecting it ...
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Is it an understandable sentence? [closed]

Throughout the paper, we suppose that a,b,c and d are fixed and we will not write them when they appear as indices in the notations to make the notations more readable.
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Can 'post' and 'after' used interchangeably?

I notice few colleagues use 'post' almost everywhere. Today one of them said 'lets meet up post noon' and I thought shouldn't it be 'afternoon'? I could be okay with 'post lunch' but somehow 'post ...
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Can I put the question word “where” at the end of a question? [closed]

I got this sentence from a Primary 5 student's worksheet. According to this passage, this creature can be found where? Some of the parents think that the sentence should be "..., where can ...
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Meaning of “additive form”

I'm writing a inferential visual analysis and I'm not sure if the phrase "Additive form" makes sense. The phrase is meant to represent a persons added form (for example clothing). I'm using it in the ...
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Is it bad English to have two to's in a row?

For example how would one correct the sentence "what website should I go to to upload the photo?" or is it correct already?
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Is “down the years” a common idiom?

Is it possible to say that "something horrible will happen down the years"?
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Is it correct to say “the bird is in the tree” or “on the tree”?

In the children's rhyme: Johnny and July sitting in a tree K I S S I N G First comes love Then comes marriage Then come children in a baby carriage They are said to be sitting in a tree. ...