Grammaticality refers to whether something obeys the rules of grammar for English.

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“Support on the project” or “support with the project”

What would be the correct preposition to use? Thanks for your support on/with the project.
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2answers
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Is this sentence grammatical and punctuated correctly?

Does this sentence need to be broken up by a semi colon, conjuction, or a period? Is there a modifier error here as well? The peasants were the least free of all people, bound by tradition and ...
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6answers
6k views

Is it correct to say “What was your name?”?

Is it correct to say "What was your name?"? The reason I am asking this is, generally the name of the person will not change. One should say "What is your name?" ...
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4answers
4k views

“Late to the party” vs. “late for the party”

I've heard both versions, usually in similar contexts. Which one is correct or more correct — or more prevalent — in the USA? He: This deal ends at 7 p.m. She: Sucks, I am late to the party.
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2answers
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Is answering “Hope you had a good time!” with “I did!” correct?

If someone says to me, "Hope you had a good time!" could I then answer "I did!" and it be grammatical? My first language is French, and I’m wondering if responding that way works in English.
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4answers
215 views

Why do we ask “Who is she?” in the subjective form? [closed]

If "her" is objective and "she" is subjective, why do we say: 'Who is she?' instead of: 'Who is her?' apart from the latter sounding a bit strange? For instance: 'That car belongs to ...
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3answers
443 views

Grammaticality of “What is there there?”

If someone says I am going to the market I may ask What is there at the market? If someone says I am going to the bookstore I may ask What is there at the bookstore? If someone ...
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1answer
899 views

“Our Today's Meeting” or “Our meeting that is scheduled for today” [closed]

Is it correct to say: We shall discuss it in our today's meeting. Or would it be more correct to say something longer like: We shall discuss it in our meeting that is scheduled for ...
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1answer
58 views

Is it correct to start a sentence with “Not either”? [closed]

Let´s suppose a group of people is having a conversation about what they are planning to do .. they are trying to decide between 2 options and after a while one of them says: Not either one is good ...
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2answers
113 views

“less” or “fewer” for countable and uncountable infinities [duplicate]

I feel like this is too grammatical for the math stack exchange, but I am sorry if it is too mathematical for this stack exchange. In math there are several different types of infinity, some of ...
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4answers
445 views

How crazy can “and” be?

After seeing completely insane examples of "and" usage in this question , I realized that I have no clue how to use the word "and" grammatically: How far does the insanity go? Are the following ...
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1answer
36 views

Full stop after why

I have a question regarding the use of the noun why in a sentence. Is it possible to use a full stop after why? For example, are these 2 sentences correct? That's the reason why. I chose ...
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1answer
58 views

Usage of “very much” in a sentence with a nominal complement [closed]

Does this sentence have any grammatical error? Language is very much a part of our daily activities. If it is okay, in what way is 'very much' used in this sentence?
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1answer
70 views

Lie or lay dead? [duplicate]

The context is "The mercenaries lie/lay dead." "The animal lies/lays dead." It's present tense and there's a corpse involved. I've looked it up elsewhere and I just don't understand the ...
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2answers
7k views

Grammaticality of “I am worrying” and how it compares to “I am worried” and “I worry”

This question is about worried about vs. worrying about. I think "being worried about someone/something" is more usual than "worry about", isn't it? Can I use the progressive aspect for ongoing ...
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3answers
128 views
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2answers
14k views

“Who wrote … ?” or “Who did write … ?” [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: Why is there no form of “do” in questions of the type “who knows?” I want to know which is the correct way to ask this question: Who wrote ...
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3answers
85 views

In the phrase “my dog wiggles it's butt” is the use of the apostrophe correct? [duplicate]

In the phrase "My dog wiggles it's butt" there seems to be a division of opinion as to whether the use of the apostrophe is grammatically correct. I suggest that as the dog in question is the owner ...
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2answers
82 views

Usage of “on” in the phrase “on our team”

Is the following sentence grammatically correct: "Alice on our team has been excellent in managing tasks." I'd rather substitute "from" or "in" instead of the "on" in this sentence. Can someone ...
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2answers
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Which one of these is correct sentence if there are any?

We're having a discussion about which of these three sentences is the correct one. The context is about chocolates. That's what's going to be sticked in mouth. So, here are the sentences. 1) Tag ...
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7answers
4k views

Is “most superior” correct?

I am reviewing an article, and the author uses the phrase ... this algorithm achieves the most superior fairness ... Initially I thought the phrase is not correct, just like saying that ...
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3answers
97 views

Which of the following sentences is correct and why? [closed]

We have been asked to correct the error in the sentence : Either he or I is right. The only possible change that I can think of goes like this : Either I or he is right. Am I right? It will be ...
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2answers
52 views

“should” and “been” with no have in between

My question is in reference to the following headline I came across on a running publication. It is worded as such: "The men's 1500m prelim saw a lot of pushing and shoving. So what do you think ...
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2answers
141 views

neither . . . nor . . . or

Consider the following excerpt: For several generations, my father's family has owned a cottage on California's North Coast, in Mendocino County. Valley Inn is the name it was given, which is ...
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4answers
126 views

A shorter form of question “Did it happen by coincidence?”

Imagine one person saying: "Oh, both Mary and John called me at the same time". Another asks: "Did it happen by coincidence?". I want to find the shortest possible way of asking the same ...
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1answer
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Can I use two ampersands in my logo?

I am thinking of updating my logo. Would it be wrong to write John Smith Advocate & Notary & Mediator ?
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3answers
52 views

Legality of sentence involving the word “real” [duplicate]

Is the following sentence grammatically correct? I bought a real heavy book. I feel it should have been a really heavy, but I heard people use a real heavy all the time.
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1answer
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Correctness of adding “one” before a plural form (like people) or collection

We are struggling to decide on a name for our company. Our preferred choice happens to be onefora.com. As a non-native English speaker, I am worried if it sounds odd to native speakers. Would "one ...
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2answers
744 views

Plural form of movie titles

When referring to the plural of a movie title (in the case where the movie has sequels), do you have to obey the pluralization rules of the last word in the title, or do you just add -s or -es to the ...
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5answers
120 views

The solution of so/but/since and because? [closed]

What do you think about the options of this case, i hav chosen the A", it's a little tricky?
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1answer
97 views

“You've been living here [for] too long”

Is it correct to say "You've been living here for too long"? Or is it better to drop the for? "You've been living here too long." Is either preferrable over the other for some reason?
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2answers
108 views

Is this sentence gramatically correct? [closed]

I have got transferred to Bangalore. Or I have got transfer to Bangalore. Are these sentence mean the same? Which sentence is correct?
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1answer
78 views

which is more grammatically correct on date 26/6 or in date 26/6? [duplicate]

which is more grammatically correct to say on date 26/6 or in date 26/6 ? I am using the on as a preposition and I feel not sure about that.
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2answers
1k views

“This includes me” or “This includes myself”? [duplicate]

Which of the following is correct - or are both of these examples grammatical? This includes me, my friend and my brother. This includes myself, my friend and my brother. EDIT NOTE: ...
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9answers
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Is “I am sat” bad English?

Is "I am sat" bad English? I believe it is incorrect and instead either the present continuous I am sitting or the predicate adjective I am seated should be used. I hear this quite often, ...
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1answer
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“Content of the book” OR “Content in the book”?

I'm not sure which one is appropriate. Here's the sentence I want to fit it in - Any resemblance with the content {of | in} the book is purely intentional.
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2answers
225 views

Using “so that” instead of “ensure”

I am reviewing a set of guidelines which make frequent use of to ensure, like: The soup should be taken off the gas after cooking, to ensure that it does not burn. I want the text to be less ...
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0answers
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By … we … punctuation

Is this introductory clause qualifying the rest of the sentence, such that it would require a comma, or is it simply introductory, such that it would not. I'm a bit confused about what the rule ...
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9answers
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Is “architect” a verb and a noun?

I hear the word architect used as a verb in the technical field and now more often in other industries and groups, for example: We need to architect a better solution to the problem. I am ...
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0answers
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Is this grammatically correct and is there a formal name?

The sentence is as follows: Security is focussed upon what we do want to protect but danger lies in what we do not. If the end of the sentence were changed to 'do not want to protect' it would ...
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3answers
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“I ever met” vs. “I have ever met”

In the following context, is it okay to say "I ever met" or is it "I have ever met"? Three years later you remain the coolest person I met.
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3answers
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“I myself Naresh” as an introduction

I have heard so many times that before starting presentation people introduce themselves like this: I myself Naresh and the topic I am going to present is.... Myself Naresh and the topic I am ...
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1answer
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“Thanks for VERB + ing” vs. “Thanks to VERB”: which is correct? [closed]

Should I use Thanks for being here or Thanks to be here? I have read that the first one is correct. However, I am not sure about these usages. Please tell me which one is correct and why it is ...
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1answer
34 views

X could be manipulated and Y [could be?] compromised

The sentence in question is: It is highly improbable that a typical user would understand all the potentially invasive ways in which their data could be manipulated, and their autonomy ...
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4answers
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“Sally broke her leg” vs. “Sally has broken her leg” Does switching the past simple with the present perfect affect its meaning?

Earlier today I had a private lesson with an Italian student—intermediate level, who has been studying the present perfect vs. past simple tense. His teacher had given him an exercise where a list of ...
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5answers
254 views

“Either your dog or your cat eats” vs. “Either your dog or cat eats”

Version (1) seems correct to me, but I cannot explain why it is correct grammatically. Could someone explain please? Either your dog or your cat eats my garbage. Either your dog or cat eats ...
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2answers
71 views

“The only factor considered” — no subject?

Is All this goes to show that the strength and presentation of an argument should not be the only factor considered when evaluating proposals and making decisions. grammatically correct? Or ...
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2answers
67 views

“X is subject to Y” or “X is subjected to Y”?

As with the current group term life insurance coverage these two new benefits are also considered to be non-cash taxable benefits and are subjected to statutory deductions for C\QPP contributions, ...
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2answers
78 views

Is the expression 'What's one say?' corrent?

I've just heard an unfamiliar phrase from a video: What's the driver say? At first, I thought I just couldn't follow what the actor said but I confirmed that what I had heard was right from the ...
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0answers
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Is it grammatical to combine present perfect progressive tense with a present perfect tense in one sentence?

Consider this: If you have been visiting your church lately, you have probably read the new dress code policy posted near the lobby.