Grammaticality refers to whether something obeys the rules of grammar for English.

learn more… | top users | synonyms (2)

1
vote
3answers
44 views

Usage of the phrase “type of”

I'm creating a worksheet for my students, and one of the questions asks them to identify which expression from three given expressions is correct. I am not sure how to pose the question, but I think ...
1
vote
1answer
42 views

Why does pluralization of compound words typically occur in the middle as opposed to the end of the word?

As I understand, correct plural versions of passerby and attorney general become passersby and attorneys general. But why? With passerby, the the preposition "by" has been combined with the noun ...
3
votes
5answers
1k views

“Please explain” or “explain please”

Which one is correct in this context? Person A: I think Apple will displace Google. Person B: Please explain. Should he say/write "Explain please"?
-2
votes
1answer
147 views

Can one say: “I wish magazines and newspapers would contain less ads.”? [closed]

I can say “I wish prices would go down”, but what about similar sentences that have an inanimate subject after 'wish'? For example, “I wish magazines and newspapers would contain fewer ads.” Can one ...
1
vote
2answers
8k views

“I wish I would wake up early”

Is this sentence correct? I wish I would wake up early Some grammar rules say that would shouldn't be used when its subject is the same as wish subject. It ‘would be illogical’, the rule says. ...
-2
votes
1answer
41 views

You can vs. You may [closed]

I'm struggling with the use of "can" or "may" in this sentence. "Maybe you can encounter one of our relatives" or "Maybe you may encounter one of our relatives." Which is correct? Or are ...
4
votes
1answer
113 views

Finding Grammatical Error In A Model SAT sentence [closed]

Sacajawea, a Native American woman, whose ability to translate between indigenous languages and English was extremely helpful to the explorers, Louis and Clark, on their expedition to the Pacific ...
0
votes
1answer
85 views

How old are you? or What is your age? [closed]

Which is more common or used more and also the correct way of asking?
1
vote
1answer
63 views

In what (semantic) context might “REFUSE” be used with a gerund complement?

I know that, prescriptively speaking, that the verb "refuse" is supposed to be followed by an infinitive. For example: The parents refused to buy the dangerous toy for their kid. Since language ...
0
votes
3answers
10k views

Is a comma needed to offset a title?

If I were to try and describe a book called "Book", is this sentence grammatically correct? The book Book by Joe Bob is set in... I was told that this sentence is incorrect, that commas must ...
1
vote
4answers
541 views

If I wanted to say, “There are three twos in the English language,” would “twos” be the correct spelling?

Taken from this question on a blog, how would correct usage in the situation where you are talking about "to, too and two" in the english language be phrased? Would it be along the lines of "There ...
3
votes
2answers
74 views

Is “switched” always used as a verb?

I was thinking that the word switched could be used as a noun and maybe an adjective too but I might just be making grammar mistakes. Switched in the dictionary only shows up as being a verb! Here ...
5
votes
4answers
6k views

If I attain a Master's degree, how do I refer to myself?

This is in reference to holding an MLS degree. Am I a "Master"? Would it be correct to say When I become a Master of Library Science, I would like to... That sounds somehow kooky, but I can't ...
1
vote
1answer
68 views

comparative clause

The following three sentences appear in the same published paper. Why does No. 1 employ the auxiliary "did" whereas the other two omit it? This could explain why ProRoot WMTA showed significantly ...
3
votes
1answer
321 views

Unless in third conditional sentences

"Jane wouldn't have found a job unless she had gone to London" is a natural-sounding sentence and has two different meanings, depending on whether Jane really did move to London or not: (1) "Jane ...
0
votes
0answers
8 views

Using past tense for retelling events, even though the logic behind the decisions made is still valid [duplicate]

This is related to this question about using past tense when speaking of something that was observed in the past, but you know it still is the same. What if you're talking about a generally held ...
1
vote
1answer
57 views

“Informing” — Gerund instead of Verb+Object?

I think if we take informing as a noun in this sentence, it should be fine. What are your views on the grammaticality of the following sentence? He left me without informing.
-1
votes
2answers
210 views

“The title of Bachelor of Engineering” vs “the title Bachelor of Engineering”

... obtained the diploma and the title of Bachelor of Engineering (B.Eng.). ... obtained the diploma and the title Bachelor of Engineering (B.Eng). Which sentence is correct? Which is ...
-1
votes
1answer
28 views

Is 'it' redundant in '… which God hath ordained it' ? (1899 UK)

I was reading this which linked to Prof Lawler's PDF. I thought to try the Matriculation examination in 1899 just (on p 6 of 6) to test the littleness of my linguistic knowledge: 10. "To make a ...
4
votes
4answers
1k views

“Let's see how can we do this”?

I'm reading the C++ boost library and the following sentence drew my attention: Once the two steps have been successfully completed, the process can start writing to and reading from the address ...
1
vote
3answers
591 views

How should this sentence be structured?

I want to know which one of these two sentence structures is correct grammatically: This book is, despite being dense, a good read. This book, despite being dense, is a good read.
0
votes
2answers
21 views

“Things are N1, N2, N3” or “Things are with N1, N2, N3”?

I wrote a sentence in my article: The most important things are: practicability, simplicity however my friend told me that the sentence should be: The most important things are with ...
61
votes
10answers
38k views

What is wrong with the word “performant”?

I keep getting the red underlining in Word whenever I write the word "performant". Here I intend to refer to something that performs well or better than something else (i.e., it's more performant). ...
0
votes
1answer
44 views

using are to name but a few

In a very formal writing style, Is it fine to use to name but a few in a separate sentence? There are a lot of algorithms to do hashing. MD5, SHA1 and CRC are to name but a few.
0
votes
4answers
344 views

What is the difference between “leading” and “winning” in a game?

Is it correct to use 'winning' or 'leading' when referring to the current state of a match/game? e.g. for a game between Patriots and Broncos in progress, if Patriots have scored higher points than ...
1
vote
1answer
83 views

Is the “B” in Brussels Sprouts capitalized? [closed]

It's not standard to capitalize "F" in french fries... In that case what is the proper way to write it?
0
votes
1answer
54 views

Position of adverb with respect to the adjective it modifies [closed]

The arm was so badly injured (a) that he must have (b) it amputated (c). Which part of this sentence has an error? Should it be "The arm was injured so badly." Is that right?
2
votes
1answer
32 views

object or complement confusion?

In this sentence: He is going to school. is the word "school" an object or complement? My confusion arises from the dual observations that: (a) it apparently can not be object, because the verb ...
20
votes
5answers
9k views

Types of things vs. types of thing

When speaking precisely or technically, one would say that "Homo erectus and homo sapiens are two species of hominid" rather than "Homo erectus and homo sapiens are two species of hominids." The ...
0
votes
5answers
274 views

“There's no point” vs. “it's no point”

I came across this English test question: You aren't allowed to use your mobile so ________. it's no point in leaving it on [my answer] there's no point in leaving it on [correct ...
21
votes
7answers
7k views

Is “He is risen” Correct?

This is not correct, right? Mixing present tense and past tense makes me think it is not correct but I see it so often on signs that I'm not even sure any more. Is there a specific reason why it's ...
-1
votes
1answer
57 views

Can you be metaphorically abrasive to something?

I just made the statement: I’m abrasive to poetry. And I was told that it’s not grammatically correct. Does it make sense?
0
votes
1answer
35 views

'develop' or 'developing' [closed]

Here are my constructions: He has the ability to develop policies, procedures and solutions that improve network disaster recovery and business continuity. He has the ability to developing ...
0
votes
1answer
40 views

Problem with sentences structures [closed]

I have problem with sentences structures. I have sentences: He possesses wide span of skills and specialized knowledge in design, implementation, management, and maintenance a fully ...
0
votes
4answers
148 views

Is this sentence comprehensible?

Heyho! I've been discussing the following sentence with my girlfriend for days. For me (the author :)) it is understandable. She thinks that the point is hard to get and the sentence could be better ...
0
votes
2answers
32 views

can use neither and not together? [closed]

The price estimates include both state and national taxes, neither not delivery charges. Is this corrected? I know 'neither' and 'not' can't use together.
1
vote
2answers
73 views

Are my friend vs. are my friends? [closed]

Which one of the following is correct and why? You both are my friend. or You both are my friends.
4
votes
2answers
4k views

A study of awake and awaken

It has been drawn to my attention that I may not be using the verb 'awake'correctly in the active and passive. Please could someone confirm that I have now got this right. In their simple present ...
5
votes
2answers
287 views

Is this correct: “Aloof the hallow things shall always be”?

I'm writing a poem, and I wondered if, to a native speaker, this would sound awkward (or grammatically incorrect): Aloof the hallow things shall always be. As a variant of The hallow things ...
0
votes
3answers
641 views

Is the use of Simple Past correct in “Although I didn't study for the test, I got a good grade”?

As both actions refer to the past, shouldn't we use Past Perfect to refer to the action that happened first (or rather didn't happen in this particular case)? That is, I am thinking the appropriate ...
6
votes
4answers
4k views

Is the expression 'half a percent' acceptable in formal English?

When central banks raise or lower interest rates the radio announcer will say for example: an increase of one half of one percent Informally people use half a percent instead, which is less ...
1
vote
1answer
64 views

“Twice (adj.)-er” vs. “two times (adj.)-er” vs. “twice/two times as (adj.) as”

Suppose we are comparing a particular characteristic (that takes comparative -er) of two items, A and B. Compared to B, A displays double that characteristic. There are multiple ways we can express ...
0
votes
2answers
56 views

Do I need a determining pronoun if it can be implied?

It’s the hour at which they usually go out for their daily walk or It’s the hour they usually go out for their daily walk
0
votes
0answers
31 views

Using “well” to start a sentence [duplicate]

What does "well" mean when used to start a sentence. Examples: "Well I never like going to the store with my aunt" "Well its still better than cooking onions"
1
vote
0answers
33 views

Usage of “Only” and “Comma” [closed]

I was wondering if these sentences are correct ; Only then did she realize the stress he was under. (o) What if we add a comma in this sentence? Only then, did she realize the stress he was ...
-2
votes
3answers
57 views

The use of “Their” [duplicate]

I saw on facebook recently where its states and individuals birthday for all to see and comment the use of "their", which seemed inappropriate to me. Upon further investigation on my singular male ...
2
votes
3answers
819 views

He or him in this sentence?

Just read this line on the Guardian: He dismantles his bedroom and helps tidy the house, daubing white paint over the pencil marks on the doorframe which have measured the growth of he and his ...
0
votes
2answers
58 views

“Making Do” or “Make Do”? [closed]

Consider the following sentence At present, I'm making do with what I have Though it tells you what I'm trying to convey, something feels funny about the phrase "making do". Is it grammatically ...
0
votes
2answers
88 views

What do you call the grammatical element that describes the state of being of the subject?

Suppose we have these sentences: 1. Smiling, she offered me a hot cup of chocolate. 2. Busy finishing my homework, I have no time to even think about video games. 3. Knowing there's little change of ...
-1
votes
1answer
103 views

what to use: Them or it? [closed]

Question about the phrase: please, could you fill out 3 documents in attachment and send them (or it?) to me Thank you in advance!