Grammaticality refers to whether something obeys the rules of grammar in English. If your question is about grammar itself, please use the "grammar" tag.

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Is that grammatically right if I use two predicates without using a conjunction to link them? [duplicate]

Is it grammatically right if I use two predicates without using a conjunction to link them? There are many sentences using this structure when I read a composition. Examples: He became a ...
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1answer
108 views

Can we use both “gonna” and “wanna” together? [closed]

For instance, can we say "I'm gonna wanna do it". or is it better to say "I am going to want to do it". It shouldn't be grammatically incorrect, but can we consider this is not common even in informal ...
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1answer
167 views

“with” vs “to have”

I have a tendency to say things like: It was nice with cake. Usually it's in the form of: It was adjective with noun. whereas my wife is always correcting me to: It was nice to have ...
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4answers
145 views

“Politifact was unable to find that report, and neither were we.” [closed]

Politifact was unable to find that report, and neither were we. Is this correct? Shouldn't "were" be "could"?
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1answer
71 views

“whatever” as pure determiner?

My dictionaries and references define, and I've always thought of, one of the functions of the word whatever as a "relative determiner." In a sentence like, "I will help you in whatever way is ...
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1answer
44 views

Comma usage; punctuation [closed]

"Pans propounds the view that, despite the importance of expeditious and efficient proceedings, efficiency and fastness should never be the determining factors." Pans propounds the view that , ...
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1answer
38 views

Capitalizing Work Titles — Beyond General Rules

The rule I'm getting is: Capitalize if it comes before the name: Janitor Richard McGill was a fastidious man. Director Campbell slept in the office as McGill the janitor proofread his annual ...
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1answer
43 views

Comma or No Comma? Workplace and Title [closed]

Anthony Martin, assistant accountant, PwC, and associate editor, Washington Post. The commas above look a little too much. Are they technically all correct? Which would you recommend removed? I ...
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1answer
102 views

Sentence type, clause identification

I've been told that this is an example of a complex sentence: But then he took a great leap, trying to pull a high kick out of the sky. I see that the "but then" serves as a cohesive conjunction ...
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2answers
5k views

“Containing” or “consisting of”

My memory is shocking lately and would like your advice on choosing a word. See, I am building an app for a client, and there's a notification area that says (or will say), something like this: ...
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2answers
60 views

Does the sentence “How do you like Painting Exhibition?” make any sense? [closed]

Does this question make any sense? Is it grammatically correct? How do you like Painting Exhibition?
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5answers
35k views

Can “whose” refer to an inanimate object?

We lit a fire whose fuel was old timber wood. Is the word whose referring to fire, an inanimate object, correct in this sentence? Or is there a more appropriate word?
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15answers
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Is “Am I needing to. . . ?” grammatical?

In the course of answering this question (which is now deleted and may be viewed only by 10K+ community members), we have evoked some dispute over whether the phrase Am I needing to read this ...
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3answers
66 views

How should I interpret “case” in the headline, “Obama Case Against Ground War: 100 U.S. Deaths a Month”

There was the article with a headline, “Obama Case Against Ground War: 100 U.S. Deaths a Month” in New York Times (December 17) followed by the paragraph: “President Obama acknowledged that ...
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0answers
33 views

The more…the more structure with normal clause?

The more they sing, their burden lightens and their love deepens As you can see, the first clause applied "the more" structure, but the second one didn't. Is it acceptable and grammatically ...
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1answer
50 views

“Every interest and faith is…” vs. “Every interest and faith are…” [closed]

Please tell me which of the following options is correct: Option 1: It is also imperative to respect different beliefs, making sure every interest and faith is suitably represented at all times. ...
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2answers
117 views

Is it bad practice to say “a husband and his wife” because of redundancy?

Phrasing like "a husband and his wife" or "a daughter and her father" always irked me, for being a bit redundant. Surely, it is enough to say "man and his wife" (or in the case of same-sex marriages ...
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1answer
37 views

Is this parallel? "He's not only the Hair Club president but also a client.'

Are the following sentences grammatically parallel? "He's not only the Hair Club president but also a client." (No comma.) "Not only is he the Hair Club president, but also he is a client." (Comma.) ...
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2answers
1k views

Is the usage “one of the better” correct and grammatical?

A colleague of mine stated that he often hears "one of the better X" from native speakers. I haven't heard this phrase often, and I would use "one of the best X" myself, unless I want to contrast ...
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5answers
6k views

Correct usage of the verb “do”

Is it correct to use the word "do" twice in a row? For instance; "I do do that" or would you say "I do that"? "You do do that" or "You do that"? Which is correct, or are they both correct?
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1answer
57 views

Is “hats-led society” grammatically correct and does it convey the right message?

It's a strange phrase indeed. It's from a foreign phrase. There's a period where a slogan "hats lead the society to become a superpower" was in effect. *Edit I think I should have given historical ...
3
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2answers
85 views

Making something “something else”

Please take a look at this: The sunlight reflected on every wave crest, making the ocean a sea of sparkling stars. I'm trying to understand both of the bold parts, the followings are my ...
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0answers
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A handgun vs. Handguns

In high school debates, we have resolutions or topics. This month our topic is: In the United States, private ownership of handguns ought to be banned. Many debaters will specify a certain ...
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2answers
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Behave as if it was or it were

You can place the script in the head or body as you like. The script will behave as if it was located exactly where you put the script tag in the document. The sentences above are taken from ...
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2answers
3k views

“Not only…, but also” without “but”

As far as I understand, this structure is grammatically correct: Not only would it provide ..., but it also would... Can we omit "but" without introducing a mistake? Not only would it ...
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1answer
57 views

Start save money or start saving money? [closed]

Is it right to say "Start save money..." or it should be start saving money? and how the continuation of a such sentence after that could be... I mean, which of the following are correct sentences: ...
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0answers
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Is the use of the indefinite article possible in the sentence context?

Is the use of the indefinite article below possible in this context? In the out-of-court settlement, the drug makers virtually admitted that they were responsible for the spread of a fatal ...
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4answers
1k views

“There is” vs. “there are” when contracted [duplicate]

Unless I am mistaken, when referring to a single thing or entity, one can say there is or there's (the contraction of the same). When referring to more than one of something, the correct wording is ...
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5answers
7k views

The correct usage of 'Not only' in the beginning of a negative sentence

Am I using Not only . . . but also correctly? Not only have these conditions been not prepared in developed countries, but developing countries also have not accepted them. Not only have not these ...
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0answers
59 views

“My goal is to be happy” or “being happy” - Which of them is correct? [closed]

Which of these is grammatical? My goal is to be happy. or My goal is being happy. My friend told me that the second one is incorrect, but I don't believe my friend about this.
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1answer
46 views

“the school was set in a little pray house with hardly any walls/without any walls…”

"the school was set in a little pray house built with bamboo and straw with hardly any walls". Is it grammatically correct? Since I don't know that "with hardly any walls" modifies "the school" ...
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9answers
244k views

Which is correct, “you and I” or “you and me”?

When the phrase is used as an object, why so many native speakers are saying "you and I" instead of "you and me"? I'm not a native speaker but I thought "you and me" is correct. Not sure if this falls ...
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1answer
42 views

Use of aux. “be” with “got” for passive?

Someone got full marks in the exam. Is it possible to change its voice to passive using got as follows? Full marks were got by someone. Why or why not?
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5answers
1k views

Proper use of the word “lousy”?

Is the sentence below correct? The place is lousy with hippies I looked it up on merriam-webster.com but they said that lousy was: infested with lice Close, but not quite there...
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2answers
457 views

Usage of “on” in the phrase “on our team”

Is the following sentence grammatically correct: "Alice on our team has been excellent in managing tasks." I'd rather substitute "from" or "in" instead of the "on" in this sentence. Can someone ...
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2answers
164 views

The correct syntactic usage of “Only”

Question #1: Which of the following sentences has the correct syntactic usage of the word "only"? Question #2: What do the remaining sentences mean? Examples: Only I gave him $1. I only ...
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0answers
40 views

Is “But to no avail” a fragment?

I am trying to write a dialogue and I wanted to end it with "But to no avail." however I am not sure if it is grammatically correct or not. “Go ahead!” he begged. “It's going to be okay.” But ...
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2answers
2k views

Had been vs was

Now this is confusing.. I wanna know the difference between the following sentences: -If you were there, I would see you. -If you had been there, I would have seen you. What's the difference ...
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2answers
562 views

preposition “travel in” or “travel by” [duplicate]

Which is the grammatically correct statement : "We are travelling in a car" Or "We are travelling by a car"
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1answer
141 views

Should I put “the” in this sentence?

I have this sentence: Your environment advances the well being of humanity and the society. Should I put the before society, or should I remove it and put it before humanity?
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3answers
113 views

What is implied by the bold sentences?

Malfoy : “But this is servant stuff, it’s not for students to do. I thought we’d be copying lines or something, if my father knew I was doing this, he’d —” Hagrid : “— tell yer that’s how ...
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0answers
49 views

Using past perfect with “Less than a week later”?

I was wondering whether I can use the past perfect tense this way or not. One week later, I had already visited 3 different countries. What I am trying to convey here is that during the week I ...
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2answers
54 views

Redeem into…?

I just saw a Bank of America commercial that had this use of redeem: Is the use of redeem with the preposition into standard...or possible? To me, it doesn't make sense. I looked on Google and ...
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9answers
7k views

Is “gift” accepted as a verb?

I have always argued adamantly, as long as the issue has been around, that gift should never be used as a verb. However, someone whose English knowledge I quite respect disagrees. I’ve done some ...
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2answers
117 views

Why isn't “read” spelled “reat” [closed]

Why isn't read spelled reat? I mean build, building, built -> read, reading, reat? PS I have dyslexia and I'm not native in English.
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3answers
545 views

Train Station vs. Railway Station

When I say "train station" I am corrected to say "railway station", but I don't understand why. Examples... Buses are stationed at a bus station. Trains are stationed at a train station. ...
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1answer
66 views

On a side note vs. on a different note?

Is it grammatically correct if I write: On a side note, should I expect an e-mail/telephone call from you confirming my NHO date? I am not sure if you are able to obtain/verify all the required ...
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2answers
50 views

Does a comma come between because and although?

I am editing answer explanations for a school curriculum. The more I read the phrase "because although", the more stumped I become on whether there should be a comma between because and although. ...
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7answers
1k views

“I've gotten better-looking as I get older” When did “gotten” re-enter the BrEng vernacular?

This summer I went to Ireland, to be more precise Dublin. Overall good weather and good fun. Anyway, while I was staying in Dublin I'd buy the local newspaper and one tabloid headline caught my eye. ...
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2answers
105 views

“unaccept” Is it a correct word?

Many a times I used the word "unaccept". But everytime our system shows redline (spellcheck). I believe it is the opposite of "accept", correct? If its a mistake, what should I use?