Grammaticality refers to whether something obeys the rules of grammar for English.

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Question tag for a sentence of future tense

For a sentence of future tense, one containing a form of the verb "be", should the question tag include that form of "be"? Example: Which sentence is correct? I would be in the city, wouldn't I ...
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55 views

I need a word to describe a person who seeks information for other people?

Im looking for another word to call a person who seeks and finds information for others.
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2answers
78 views

“Among his team” or “among his team members”

Would it be correct to say "to disсuss among his team"? Can we use "among" with collective noun (team, group, committee, etc) if they are in singular form? Or "among" always must be followed by plural ...
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1answer
55 views

Is the statement grammatically correct? [closed]

Is the bold part of the following statement grammatically correct? Let $A$ be the set of all cycles in $B$ which their lengths are congruent to $i$ modulo 7.
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2answers
62 views
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1answer
37 views

“Under one year old” versus “Less than one year old”

Which is correct: Amy has a child under a year old Amy has a child less than a year old
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1answer
40 views

is this sentence right [closed]

"nothing cannot be fix in 0 seconds so result is no fix" Is this sentence right in the way of grammaticality and meaning
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3answers
7k views

Is it proper to have consecutive adverbs?

Is it proper grammar to have consecutive adverbs in a sentence? e.g. "It was not exactly accidentally.... My thought is that is probably is not proper, especially in this case. The above could have ...
3
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1answer
61 views

simultaneous dialogue [closed]

[[The question has been edited in an attempt to address the reason it was originally put on hold.]] Suppose that several individuals are speaking. There are two conversations occurring at once in the ...
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3answers
60 views

Is this sentence using relative clauses correct grammatically? [closed]

The winner of the competition is the person who gets the cheese first, which is the prize.
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2answers
304 views

Let me confirm your name. Is this sentence grammatically correct? [closed]

While you are on a customer service call, how would you clarify the name? Is it grammatically correct to say, " let me confirm your name".
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1answer
237 views

“A mice problem” vs. “a mouse problem”

My friend said to me one day: "We have a mice problem at UNI". Is "a mice problem" grammatical as opposed to "a mouse problem"?
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8answers
6k views

“I'm lovin' it”

How normal-sounding is the slogan "I'm lovin' it" to native ears? I know it sounded quite odd to me when I first heard it — and it still sometimes does —, but I can't even tell why. Sure, love is ...
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2answers
1k views

Is “considering taking” grammatically correct?

I've seen the following sentence in a newspaper. Is it grammatical? He's considering taking early retirement. Taking = present progressive was used near another present progressive?
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1answer
8k views

Ellipsis or Ellipses?

Inspired by this question: What is the correct term to use when describing the "three dots" (. . .), ellipsis or ellipses? And are either of these terms considered plural? For example, if I wanted to ...
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3answers
5k views

Is “of ” necessary in “all of ”?

Listen to all your fans vs Listen to all of  your fans OR Name all the states vs Name all of  the states What part of language is of  in these examples? Is it necessary or ...
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1answer
52 views

Is “reflectionally” a word? [closed]

Is it correct to say two shapes are "reflectionally symmetric"? Or do I need to say they are "reflectively symmetric"? Or are both words correct, but with different meanings? Or are both words ...
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3answers
142 views

Synonym wanted for 'make it easy '

I am confused about how to write the sentence below. Is it grammatically correct? Our mission is to make it easy to post or search institute. Are there any alternate phrases for "make it easy"?
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1answer
122 views

Why is this sentence grammatically wrong?

Albert Einstein, who will always be revered in history, was not only a great scientist but a great human being. What's wrong with that sentence? My teacher gave us a hint and said the problem may ...
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2answers
69 views

Can “I would please prefer” be grammatical?

I got into a friendly argument with another user over whether a construction like I would please prefer to talk tomorrow. can be grammatical. To my eye, that just seems plain wrong. I would ...
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2answers
1k views

Is “fake teeth” correct?

Is the phrase "fake teeth" correct? I googled it and found out that it is used. But my English tutor says that this phrase is incorrect and the book from Hillside Press had this phrase as a mistake. ...
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1answer
119 views

Can we omit the definite article, *the*, in front of two musical instruments?

My sentence is He plays the piano & the violin. Is it correct to say He plays the piano & violin?
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2answers
5k views

Usage and correctness of the term “Better than Best”

I have heard the term "Better than Best" used at few places. How is it different than saying just "best"? For example : a) He is better than the best. b) He is the best. 1) How are (a) and (b) ...
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6answers
13k views

What is the proper usage of “not only… but also”?

I'm trying to figure out how to use "not only... but also" properly. Basically, my goal is to combine two clauses by using "not only". For negations, I've figured out two styles that both sound ...
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1answer
87 views

Listing two people and yourself [duplicate]

"My brothers, my cousins, and I" "My brothers, my cousins and I" Which one is correct?
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2answers
53 views

Meaning of “knew from” in this sentence [duplicate]

I'm trying to understand the usage of "knew from" in the following quote: (suddenly cleaning ladies knew from sun-dried tomatoes, suddenly hog farmers knew from creme brulee) Source: The ...
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1answer
79 views

Is it “Does social media” or “Do social media”? [duplicate]

I am confused as to which way to say the following: "Does social media benefit people?" or "Do social media benefit people?"
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1answer
93 views

What's wrong with this sentence? How can it be improved? [closed]

It has been a long time that I associated myself with an organisation. I'm not sure if I can use myself in this context, since there is an I already implying the same. Can I use associated - a ...
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2answers
4k views

Is “make due” now considered acceptable?

Whilst plodding through Patrick Rothfuss' "The Name of the Wind", I came across: Our dinner was nowhere near as grand as last night's. We made due with the last of my now-stale flatbread, dried ...
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2answers
6k views

How to remember using “have” instead of “of”? [closed]

I'm (reasonably) sure these are wrong: I would of won. I could of done that. and are likely so common because if you phonetically transcribe "would've", "could've", etc, that's what you get. ...
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5answers
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Divide two into four and Divide two by four

Why does "divide two into four" equal two, and "divide two by four" equal one half? Correct if I am wrong, but this what I have learned recently.
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5answers
10k views

Is it correct to say “the bird is in the tree” or “on the tree”?

In the children's rhyme: Johnny and July sitting in a tree K I S S I N G First comes love Then comes marriage Then come children in a baby carriage They are said to be sitting in a tree. ...
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2answers
5k views

When is it OK to use OK?

I often use "OK" in business and personal emails and phone conversations. But I often feel uncertain if it is appropriate to use it in every type of context. Please tell how universally I can use ...
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1answer
6k views

The difference between “have a lunch” and “have lunch”

Is there any difference between I am not having a lunch tomorrow. and I am not having lunch tomorrow. This is a follow up question of : About the use of future tense.
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2answers
883 views

Is the meme, “all your base are belong to us” correct for any time period?

Surely many people have heard, “all your base are belong to us”. It is a popular internet meme from 2000. The Wikipedia page calls it “broken English”, but it seems as if some translations of The ...
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8answers
4k views

Past participle after noun: “proposed cost” vs. “cost proposed”

I have the following two examples: Our proposed cost is expensive. Our cost proposed is expensive. Is there any difference between them? Or is the second sentence wrong?
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2answers
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Why must 'offices' be pluralised in 'good offices'? [closed]

Source: p 529, Blackwood's Edinburgh Magazine, Volume 119 Temple's reply was prompt aud generous. Swift was forthwith ordained, and presented by Lord Capel, the then Lord-Deputy (we are ...
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1answer
37 views

What is more grammatically correct? [duplicate]

what is more grammatically correct: products that were featured OR products which were featured?
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0answers
8 views

Which is correct: “need removed” or “need to be removed” [duplicate]

Example: "...these items need removed immediately." vs. "...these items need to be removed imediately." Which is the correct grammatical usage of "removed" in past tense? Or, is there a better ...
0
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1answer
46 views

Fraction of … IS or ARE? [duplicate]

Should I use What fraction of the residents are married? or What fraction of the residents is married? Technically, as fraction is singular, I would use the latter version. Am I correct?
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3answers
58 views

What is this passive construction called?

I wonder what the tax raised is called as a sentence part shown below, and whether it's grammatical. Please suggest corrections if it isn't. The tax raised, more small enterprises will close down. ...
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6answers
564 views

“I am angry to die” or “I am angry to death”

I want to say that I may die because I am angry. Can I say "I am angry to die" or "I am angry to death" to express the above?
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1answer
152 views

Any question bank of Rewriting sentences without changing the meaning [closed]

I am having Grammar exam in a week so I am looking for nay reference on a collection of large number of questions like rewriting sentences without changing the meaning, etc. Our textbook is not good ...
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1answer
42 views

“According to our discussion, is that correct I DO this part?” is this sentence correct?

The whole sentence is here: Since this coming Sunday is the first day of March, our children need new TWA schedules, according to our discussion, is that correct I DO this part? Can I write this ...
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3answers
3k views

Can “neither” be placed at the beginning of the sentence?

Which of the following is grammatical? Trust neither a new friend nor an old enemy. Neither trust a new friend nor an old enemy.
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1answer
52 views

How is this sentence to be interpreted?

One thing that bothers me - a lot - reading older English texts, is the apparent tendency of writers to write what appear to me to be sentence fragments. For instance, today I found this old "map": ...
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1answer
96 views

May I pay “in cash” or just “cash” without in?

What is the right phrase - May I pay "in cash" or may I "pay cash"?
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3answers
4k views

How to correct a sentence that Word thinks is a fragment I need to revise?

I will be specific. I am trying to frame a sentence to include in a blog post. Instinctively it feels lame and wrong. Word keeps asking me to consider revising the fragment. As I am not a native ...
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3answers
213 views

plural or singular in this sentence

The product and the scale have changed from a small prototype to many production units. The product along with the scale has changed from a small prototype to many production units. Can ...
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1answer
24 views

Safe and sounder/soundier? [closed]

Is it safe and sounder or safe and soundier? Like we say "May God keep you safe and sounder/soundier" What is correct way to say?