Grammaticality refers to whether something obeys the rules of grammar for English.

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How to use namely correct

Is this a correct use of namely: We will investigate two different research questions: 1. Is there a correlation between age and income? 2. Does university education lead to higher income? ...
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3answers
32k views

Punctuation for the phrase “including but not limited to”

This is my first question on this stack exchange. I'm hoping this kind of question is welcome here, and excuse my ignorance, but my confusion evident below is exactly why I am a Software Engineer ...
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1answer
149 views

“Can” or “could”, which is grammatically correct?

I'm a call center agent. When I ask to transfer the call to the authorized person, which form should I use: Can I speak to...? or Could I speak to...?
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1answer
4k views

The difference between “have a lunch” and “have lunch”

Is there any difference between I am not having a lunch tomorrow. and I am not having lunch tomorrow. This is a follow up question of : About the use of future tense.
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2answers
49 views

Valid to use “more conceptually” at the beginning of a sentence?

Suppose I have the following two sentences... The equation can be expressed in terms of the (insert complex but slightly conceptual gibberish here). More conceptually, the heavy cow moves slower ...
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1answer
79 views

“As far as job is concerned, marriage is no longer an obstacle.” Is this a grammatically correct and meaningful sentence?

There was a question in a book: Do women in your country work after they get married? Does "As far as job is concerned, marriage is no longer an obstacle." mean that having a job is no ...
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2answers
112 views

Sentence structure for grammar: parallel vs. what feels natural

Are the following both grammatically correct, or is one incorrect and why? (Usage context: book, not an essay). Original: He erases whatever he wills, and fixes. With him is the original record. ...
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4answers
145 views

Preposition for “to be qualified”

Would you please tell me whether the following fragment is grammatically correct? ...led me to be qualified in various science Olympiads. For instance, I ranked 21st among... I know that ...
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6answers
45k views

Is “over-exaggerated” correct English?

Isn't "exaggerated" enough? Is it right to say "over-exaggerated"?
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2answers
42 views

Correct Use of “Resort to”

Are "resort to" or "resorted to" (phrasal verbs followed by a preposition) always negative? For example, is it always incorrect to write any of the following sentences, or are there circumstances ...
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4answers
637 views

Is “How and why child is become criminal” proper English?

My friend is writing a paper for his Criminal Justice class and has asked me to take a look the the rough draft and point out any grammatical errors that I can spot. The first thing that jumped at ...
0
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2answers
155 views

Is it ever acceptable to use “but” after a period/full stop [duplicate]

View the following text as a generic example, disregarding issues of context, etc. Stir constantly as the mixture begins to boil, watching the temperature regularly as the contents begins to ...
8
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5answers
382 views

Is it grammatical to say “the batmen”?

As far as I know, the five actors to have played the role of Batman in films are Adam West, Michael Keaton, Val Kilmer, George Clooney, and Christian Bale. Is it grammatical to call them "the batmen"? ...
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6answers
8k views

“One-to-one” vs. “one-on-one”

I said: "Tomorrow will be our one-to-one meeting with Mr.XYZ." My friend: "OK, one-on-one." Which is correct? One-to-one Or One-on-one
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2answers
95 views

Unnecessary pronouns: “The President he issued…”

Is it now considered acceptable to follow a proper noun with a pronoun? E.g. The President he issued a new executive order.
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1answer
137 views

Is it right to use “both” in negative sentences?

I've just come across a film review by an American author where he says: "I can assure you that both are not typical in any part of this state". In negative sentences like that, my inclination would ...
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2answers
4k views

Is it “What should he have done?” or “had he done”?

What should he have done? What should he had done? Could you tell me which one is correct? (If any.)
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2answers
59 views

Is the sentence “We are invested” correct?

Is the sentence "We are invested" correct? I found it in a blog and was wondering whether it is correct. I do not want to discuss the usage, but just if the combination of "are" + "invested" is ...
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6answers
297 views

“It's not raining today, isn't it?” vs. “it's not raining today, is it?” [duplicate]

Which is correct: It's not raining today, isn't it? It's not raining today, is it?
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0answers
21 views

Resources on writing grammatically and clearly [duplicate]

The first part of this question is about how I should ask this question. I am a bit confused about all the terms used to describe books written about English. For example, "usage", "style", ...
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1answer
63 views

Question tag for a sentence of future tense

For a sentence of future tense, one containing a form of the verb "be", should the question tag include that form of "be"? Example: Which sentence is correct? I would be in the city, wouldn't I ...
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1answer
174 views

Nationalities - When do we use the singular or plural form

I always have doubts whether to use a singular or a plural noun when I refer to certain peoples. For example, we say Americans, Italians, Brazilians, Russians and Austrians. But we say The British, ...
10
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3answers
3k views

Is “bad loser” a valid expression?

Is the expression "(someone is a) bad loser" valid? If it is valid, is it equal to "sore loser", or does it have a different meaning and/or use?
0
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1answer
529 views

“Sorry to have kept you waiting” vs. “sorry for having kept you waiting”

Can I transform "I am sorry to have kept you waiting so long" into "I am sorry for having kept you waiting so long"? Is there a difference between them? Additionally, is "I'm sorry having kept you ...
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2answers
42 views

“Huge potential profit” vs. “huge profit potential”

What is the proper usage — "huge potential profit" or "huge profit potential"?
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2answers
112 views

Variations on “a [technical term] is said to be [adjective]” suited to scientific publications

(I'll use “spooky-graphoid” as a randomly made-up technical term and “saturated” as a random adjective from the scientific vernacular.) First, when it comes to the definition of a “saturated ...
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1answer
59 views

Which verb is used for the word “activity” - “do” or “play”?

In an English test I had recently, there was this multiple choice question: There were lots of different activities for Jay to ... there. A - Make B - Do C - Play There was no extra ...
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2answers
65 views

Usage of two hads in a sentence, not continuously

Is the second sentence correct? Are we going ahead with this now? Earlier, you had told me that they had quoted a huge fee the last time we asked. Or should it rather just be "You told me that ...
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2answers
491 views

Is it grammatically correct to say “Many more happy returns of the day ”?

Many people greet me "Many more happy returns of the day" on my birthday. I thought it is grammatically wrong. Can we use "many" and "more" at a time in a sentence. I thought that it is correct to ...
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4answers
195 views

Usage of the word “ascetic”

Is the sentence "You have to be ascetic about eating junk food" correct? Ascetic: Practicing severe self-denial
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1answer
61 views

Naming a chat group with The Lee or Lee's

I want to start a WhatsApp group and I don't know which of the following names is grammatically correct: Lee Family The Lee Family Lee's Family The Lee's Family.
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0answers
66 views

Can't , can not and cannot [closed]

Can't, can not and cannot is a bit confusing. I know that can't and can not are both grammatically correct. Is cannot a real word? Is it grammatically correct? Should it be written as one word or ...
0
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1answer
63 views

“more leads mean more sales” or “more leads means more sales”?

I was just wondering which one is grammatically correct. "more leads mean more sales" OR "more leads means more sales" Of course, "more leads" is plural, but the sentence implies ...
5
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1answer
6k views

“Our end” vs. “our side”

Which is correct when writing emails? Everything is fine at our/your end. Everything is fine at our/your side.
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3answers
7k views

Is “aren't I” correct grammar?

Since "amn't I" is so clunky, is "aren't I" grammatically correct? Or is the only way to say this "Am I not"?
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3answers
102 views

there is a lot or there are a lot? over here or at here? [duplicate]

I am an English learner. While I was watching a documentary video, this caption really confused me a lot. Is it correct to say there is a lot? I thought it is supposed to be there are a lot. Also, ...
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3answers
4k views

Analysis of “It is like a dream come true”

I've been unable to grammatically analyse the sentence It is like a dream come true. To me, it should either be It is like a dream that has come true or It is like a dream comes true. ...
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7answers
190 views

Is “unredactable” a word?

I googled it and even though it's been used on the Web, I can't find any entries for it on online dictionaries. If it's not a real word, then is there a good equivalent? The context is a record ...
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3answers
228 views

Can we use “very” with a “non-” adjective?

Can we use very with an adjective that starts with "non"? For example: Absolute pathnames should be avoided in #include directives because they make the program very nonportable. For some ...
0
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1answer
63 views

A question on narration in the past

This is a bit of a complicated question. The context is that someone gave advice to someone else. The whole situation is narrated in the past. I fear that by using the past tense, the reader may ...
5
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3answers
988 views

Is “choose from one of four options” wrong?

I need backup in pressing my case that the phrase “choose from one of four options” is grammatically incorrect. Is there some resource that can prove my case, that the incorrect phrase should be ...
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3answers
223 views

Is the sentence “Anne looked at me disgusted” grammatical?

I have always thought it acceptable to say and write, "She looked at me disgusted." However, I know some consider it ungrammatical, saying it must instead be either "She looked at me disgustedly" or ...
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5answers
2k views

Past participle after noun: “proposed cost” vs. “cost proposed”

I have the following two examples: Our proposed cost is expensive. Our cost proposed is expensive. Is there any difference between them? Or is the second sentence wrong?
9
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1answer
41k views

“Would you mind to do something?”

Is it correct to say "Would you mind to do something?". I've seen this usage in a few places, but it doesn't sound right to me. I would guess that it's proper to use "Would you mind doing something?" ...
0
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2answers
592 views

“Wanting” or “want”?

Lately I have noticed that a lot of people use "wanting" in sentences, or in books, but I don't get it because my English teachers have always said to me that with verbs like "love", "like", "want" ...
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2answers
124 views

Is this correct English or is it slang from a particular region?

Is it correct to ask "Are you in area?" when you are asking if someone is from that city or township?
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4answers
428 views

Can someone please tell me which of the two sentences is correct?

Here are the two sentences. This was the fastest I heard someone responded. This was the fastest I heard someone respond. Can someone help me understand: A) Which one is correct, and what is ...
5
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2answers
23k views

“leave to” or “leave for”

Which of the following is correct? I am leaving for London. I am leaving to London. I have always thought the first one is correct till I came across the name of this painting.
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6answers
5k views

Is this correct: “I'd have to have had…”

This sentence makes my head hurt a bit, and it doesn't seem right, but perhaps you guys could help me sort it out. "If I would've gone to Canada, I'd have to have had some kind of winter gear."
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Is there some rule against ending a sentence with the contraction “it's”?

I heard this lyric in a song the other day and it just sounded so wrong that I assumed it must be incorrect grammar, but I can't find any specific prohibition that applies. That's what it's. ...