Grammaticality refers to whether something obeys the rules of grammar for English.

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looking for appositive that-which phrases

I asked sentences having an appositive that-which phrase like the following sentence in English Language Learners. The insect propagates best near "disturbed land," that which is being cultivated ...
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3answers
4k views

“Now I am” vs. “I am now”

Which is more correct? Now I am the main stakeholder... or I am now the main stakeholder... Do the intonations imply different meanings?
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1answer
60 views

Time given us or time given to us

I read this quote online: "All we have to decide is what to do with the time that is given us" - J. R. R. Tolkien Is it just a relaxation of pronunciation of "the time that [god] has given us" ? ...
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6answers
2k views

Using term “shot dead”

I'm curious about newscasters using the term "shot dead" in describing the death of a gun shot victim. Is this correct? They would never describe a survivor as "shot live".
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2answers
55 views

Should “differentiate” be plural in this sentence? [duplicate]

What we know how to do and what we have done differentiate us from others. or What we know how to do and what we have done differentiates us from others. Can anyone explain to me which is correct ...
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1answer
57 views

When to use Comma before coordinating conjunctions?

So I understand that serial comma (the one used before and/or) is used only when we have 3 or more items to be separated using and/or. What exactly is the rule that governs where to add comma before ...
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2answers
71 views

Grammatical structure of this complex sentence [closed]

Lately, I have been working on my SOP for university admissions. Here is one sentence which seems correct to my knowledge but, I have a feeling that something's missing. Any help in reframing or ...
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2answers
30 views

Is there an adjectival form of “commodity”?

The adjective would apply to the word dependence. I'd like to say commodital, but Google says it isn't a word.
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6answers
1k views

“Do a shop” for “go shopping”

This has puzzled me for a few years now. When preceded by 'a', shop becomes a noun. Does "do a shop" even make sense then? The correct phrase for me was always "go shopping", or similar. Can ...
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7answers
591 views

“I've gotten better-looking as I get older” When did “gotten” re-enter the BrEng vernacular?

This summer I went to Ireland, to be more precise Dublin. Overall good weather and good fun. Anyway, while I was staying in Dublin I'd buy the local newspaper and one tabloid headline caught my eye. ...
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3answers
323 views

Is 'so I did', and other like expressions, at the end of a sentence good English?

In Northern Ireland people will say 'He went to Bohemia on holiday, so he did', or 'I need to do some shopping, so I do'. Is this correct English?
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4answers
968 views

Usage of “might” and “would” to indicate doubt

Do the sentences She might be only 28, but Jodie Whittaker.... and My parents would have walked along the Barrow wrongly suggest doubt, or are they normal usage? Are there names for ...
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1answer
99 views

“Is himself in?” What does it mean?

Context - A stranger knocks on your door and asks "Is himself in?" himself, a reflexive pronoun, here seems to be used for a nominative pronoun.
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2answers
563 views

Statements beginning with subject+wonder

I'm wondering about the sentence structure when you use wonder. Take for instance: I wonder when will my money be refunded. I wonder when my money will be refunded. I wonder when is my ...
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4answers
951 views

Tenses for two clauses joined by “if only”

Our school had won the match if only we have concentrated. Our school would have won the match if only we would have concentrated. Our school would win the match if only we had concentrated. ...
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4answers
1k views

When someone says, “I do not feel that good”, what does that mean?

I have heard it many times in movies and shows. I think it means "I do not feel very good" or "I do not feel as good as you think", but why do we use "that" here, and is it correct?
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3answers
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“How does it look?”

Formally, in my English education, I have learned to ask for the outward appearance of something using the expression: "What does it look like?" Since my mother tongue is German and we say "Wie ...
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2answers
54 views

“Made look better” vs. “made to look better”

Results are made to look better by... Results are made look better by... Are both correct? Is there another way of phrasing this sentence?
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2answers
13k views

Is it correct to say “I feel painful” to mean “I feel pain”?

Is it correct to say "I feel painful" to mean "I feel pain"? Please note that I mean only those cases, in which the phrase is a complete sentence. There should be no words after the last word in each ...
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2answers
1k views

“Feel committed to [gerund/infinitive]”

Does "feel committed to" require an infinitive or gerund complement? For example, which of the following is grammatical? I feel committed to following up on that. I feel committed to follow ...
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7answers
8k views

Is “architect” a verb and a noun?

I hear the word architect used as a verb in the technical field and now more often in other industries and groups, for example: We need to architect a better solution to the problem. I am ...
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2answers
44 views

Definite article or no definite article before “Americans” in this sentence from “The Adventure of English”

The Adventure of English, page 286, reads "The Americans are more polite about the English than the English are about Americans" I wouldn't use the definite article before "Americans" in this ...
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4answers
2k views

What is it called when words are deliberately written wrong but pronunciation is kept unchanged?

For example, Night -> Nite Nite even appears in some dictionaries as having the same meaning as night. What is it called when words are deliberately written incorrectly but the pronunciation ...
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2answers
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“Studying PhD at the university” or “studying PhD in the university”?

Which of these two sentences is correct: I am studying PhD at the university. I am studying PhD in the university. Should I use "at" or "in"? Or is there no difference?
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3answers
454 views

Is this social media post really grammatically correct as it claims?

A friend of mine shared an image macro that contained this block of text, claiming it is grammatically correct. This exceeding trifling witling, considering ranting criticizing concerning adopting ...
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3answers
44 views

Adaptable at or in or to doing something

I am confused with what is the correct expression to use, is it better saying "I am adaptable at using smth", "I am adaptable on using smth" or "I am adaptable to using smth"? The third sounds ...
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82 views

Is the plural form of ID spelled ID's or ID? [duplicate]

How to write or tell that collection of Email ID's has been attached.
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1answer
49 views

“A unary” or “an unary?” [duplicate]

What's the rule for the "a/an" choice when a word begins with a vowel but sounds like a consonant (e.g. "unary") and vice versa?
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2answers
167 views

Should the verb phrases following “either” and “or” in an “either/or” sentence have the same structure?

Should the verb phrases following either and or in an "either or" sentence have the same structure? For example, is the following sentence correct? The coordinates of the points are either ...
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1answer
71 views

Is the omission of the verb “To be” in informative sentence [duplicate]

I have the following sentence: File (is) larger than allowed. Is the verb "to be" required here? Is it correct English to use "File larger than allowed."?
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1answer
135 views

“More so” or moreso?

I often find myself using the two words joined together, moreso. I'm not sure where I picked up this usage. I'm also not sure that it's necessarily the correct one, as some proofreading tools will ...
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2answers
643 views

Had been vs was

Now this is confusing.. I wanna know the difference between the following sentences: -If you were there, I would see you. -If you had been there, I would have seen you. What's the difference ...
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9answers
16k views

Is “a wide range of features” singular or plural?

In the office, we've been having a discussion about the grammar in a sentence and have differing opinions about what is right and what is wrong... It is a very minor issue but is still bugging me :) ...
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5answers
1k views

“You're missing the posts only available to members” — should there be a “the” in there?

Consider this sentence: You're missing posts only available to members. I think it should actually be You're missing the posts available only to members or at least You're missing ...
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3answers
154 views

“Either your dog or your cat eats” vs. “Either your dog or cat eats”

Version (1) seems correct to me, but I cannot explain why it is correct grammatically. Could someone explain please? Either your dog or your cat eats my garbage. Either your dog or cat eats ...
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2answers
36 views

I haven't offered you at least a drink [closed]

I haven't offered you at least a drink. Have I used at least correctly here? Are there rules to how an expression like at least is used?
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1answer
94 views

Can “a-mingle” be a verb in imperative mood?

In the last lines of "Jingle Bells Rock": Jingle bell time is a swell time To go gliding in a one-horse sleigh Giddy-up jingle horse, pick up your feet Jingle around the clock ...
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2answers
97 views

“The more, the merrier!” — Is this a sentence? If not… what?

Is The more, the merrier! a sentence? It doesn't seem to have a main verb, so I'm inclined to say no, but it certainly functions as a sentence in everyday speech. I can think of three ways of ...
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3answers
79 views

Need help identifying subject in sentence with a conjunction

Currently, I am involved in a disagreement as to interpreting the grammatical meaning of the following sentence: “Restores 10% of Att as HP in battle.” Given that “Att” and “HP” are nouns (with ...
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2answers
81 views

preposition “travel in” or “travel by” [duplicate]

Which is the grammatically correct statement : "We are travelling in a car" Or "We are travelling by a car" Thanks in advance...
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3answers
758 views

Is “reblog” a word?

I have heard from many friends that grammatically "reblog" is not a word. It's something similar to "retweet" from Twitter terminology but Tumblr use it quite frequently. Any ideas?
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3answers
510 views

Is it OK to write “Good to see you” in an email or Facebook message?

An old friend of mine wrote some greetings to me on facebook. Now if I want to answer his greetings, is it OK to write the following? "Hi, John, good to see you again" Because I don't "see" him ...
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5answers
531 views

To add someone “to” Facebook or “on” Facebook

Which one is correct and why: It was the first time a girl asked me to add her on Facebook Or It was the first time a girl asked me to add her to Facebook
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2answers
2k views

“The likeliest problem” vs. “the most likely problem”

The likeliest problem vs. the most likely problem: are they both correct? do they mean the same thing? is one preferable over another?
1
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1answer
112 views

“In my career as” — is “as” correct here?

I have this fragment: ... the experience and knowledge gained will be helpful in my career as a neuropathologist. Is the "as" here okay? It somehow does not sound right to me. Obviously I want ...
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4answers
3k views

Can someone please tell me which of the two sentences is correct?

Here are the two sentences. This was the fastest I heard someone responded. This was the fastest I heard someone respond. Can someone help me understand: A) Which one is correct, and what is ...
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1answer
43 views

Can we say “the must info” in the sense of valuable information? [closed]

I heard the phrase once but don't know the context of conversation. Additionally, is "the must info" grammatically correct?
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0answers
36 views

apart from + verb with gerund or not

I was reading the Rails Tutorial and I came across this: The div tag is a generic division; it doesn’t do anything apart from divide the document into distinct parts. I would say apart from ...
2
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1answer
84 views

If the rule states an infinitive follows the verb “want”, why is “I don't want you worrying” correct?

Why is the sentence "I don't want you worrying about the oral interview" correct? Is the syntax want+gerund correct? Shouldn't it be I don't want you to worry about the oral interview (?) ...