Grammaticality refers to whether something obeys the rules of grammar in English. If your question is about grammar itself, please use the "grammar" tag.

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Should I say “study materials” or “education materials” or “teaching material?”

I am building a web application where people can upload their study materials about robotics and programming and manage them and share etc. I want to name it well, so at the moment I have: ...
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20 views

Is the phrase “who/what even is [blank]” correct?

I've been hearing a lot of people recently say something like: What even is a baseball? however when I hear people say that I get the gut feeling that it should be What is a baseball even? ...
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3answers
277 views

Is it grammatically correct to shift an appositive away from the noun it renames or describes?

I'm taking a semester in London. Here's a sample of something I keep hearing: John: My mum will be here later? Susan: Is she staying for supper, your mum? If Susan wishes to say, "your ...
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2answers
94 views

Which one is correct - “ There is only us here” or “There are only us here” [duplicate]

Temporary reopen note: The linked-to question is about the verb agreeing with the grammatical number of the first item in a list in a there is/are sentence. However there is no list in this question ...
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2answers
42 views

'd hate to be vs. 'd hate being [closed]

Which of the following two structures is grammatically correct? Why? I'd hate to be questioned by the FBI. I'd hate being questioned by the FBI.
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1answer
48 views

'I couldn't use to' instead of 'I didn't use to be able to/I used not to'

I heard this over the weekend - I've been going to evening classes and now, at last, I can touch type. I couldn't use to do that. I would normally say 'I didn't use to be able to do that', or ...
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2answers
300 views

How to use “while” in the middle of the sentence?

I am confused. Is using while correct in the following sentence: Most students are able to expertly manage their time while they work along with their other responsibilities. Is it correct to ...
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2answers
102 views

How to use “what better way” to ask a rhetorical question?

I want to say that friendship can inspire a lot using a rhetorical question. Is the following question correct: What better way to get inspired than by accompanying a good friend?
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3answers
64 views

Look and tell me what you see! Is it correct as a sentence? [closed]

Look and tell me what you see. Is it correct as a statement, or should I add quotation marks?
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2answers
78 views

Is it “that” or “how”?

I have been thinking about a title for a post on another website that I'd made all day. At first, I had worded it like, "Reasons That [character one's name here] and [character two's name here] Are ...
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2answers
228 views

What exactly does it mean to say something is “grammatical?”

I often see the expression "That's ungrammatical" used to explain why something is not OK. For example, a user might post a question: "Is it OK to say, I are go to New York?" Most people would ...
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0answers
35 views

Is it correct to add an adjective after a preposition? [migrated]

Here is a sentence from an English magazine: With the weather still on this side of chilly, it might be better to stay in and nest ― especially when nursing a cold. Why not write on this side of ...
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1answer
15k views

Which one is correct — “at the city” or “in the city”?

I want to know the correct preposition to use with the word city in the following context: He arrived in the city. He arrived at the city. So which one will be correct?
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1answer
78 views

Is subpoint an acceptable word? [closed]

MS Word likes to correct "subpoint" to "sub point" Is there anything grammatically wrong with "subpoint"?
2
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1answer
47 views

How do I properly write a decesed female name that was married twice?

Lavalle E. Thielker was married to a Lester M. Arentz and he died and then she married a Thielker. Her maiden name is Lueck. Is this the correct way to show her whole name? Lavalle E. Arentz-Lueck ...
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1answer
84 views

Seem small clause

It is said that the omission of "to be" is allowed only when the adjective (phrases), noun (phrases), or prepositional phrase comes after the to be like this: a He seemed (to be) angry about the ...
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1answer
44 views

Small clauses (or verbless clauses)

Small clauses are clauses with "to be" deleted. I found him (to be) difficult. And as we all know, an adjective complement can be added afterward. I found him (to be) difficult to work ...
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0answers
54 views

Is it right to say “What time is it?” and “What day is it?” when asking about the day and the time of an event? [migrated]

If there's an event yet to come and two people talking to each other about it, if one of them doesn't know about the day and the time, can he ask (What day is it?) and (What time is it?)? Isn't it ...
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2answers
27 views

Usage of “this issues with”

It has been customary to use the following sentence in official parlance, at the end of transfer orders. "This issues with the approval of the competent authority" Is this usage acceptable? This ...
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2answers
58 views

Present participle phrase with negative auxiliary [closed]

So I was writing as any other usual days. And I encountered a problem. He does not lose his temper, being driven by his emotions. Well, after I wrote this, I could see that it was not what I ...
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1answer
22 views

“Actions taken on [Noun]” vs “Actions taken against [Noun]”

I am an Australian working in the US. During the workday I often find myself either reading documents or being corrected in how I write them myself when it concerns this grammatical usage. Which is ...
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1answer
28 views

A question on grammar [closed]

I am an English teacher—a non-native, of course. During teaching my coursebook, I came across a structure that seems to be wrong: His was lost at the dry cleaners. Is it correct grammatically ...
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2answers
138 views

“As far as job is concerned, marriage is no longer an obstacle.” Is this a grammatically correct and meaningful sentence?

There was a question in a book: Do women in your country work after they get married? Does "As far as job is concerned, marriage is no longer an obstacle." mean that having a job is no ...
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2answers
236 views

Can predicative complements not be bare noun phrases in English? That is, are clauses such as “I am student” incorrect?

In Chapter 4 of the book A Student’s Introduction to English Grammar, written by Rodney Huddleston of the University of Queensland and Geoffrey K. Pullum of the University of Edinburgh and published ...
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1answer
44 views

Grammatically correct questions in a survey [closed]

Trying to ask following questions in a customer feedback form: What tools do you for recruitment? What are you favorite features of these tools? What are the functionalities missing in these tools ...
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1answer
2k views

“Favorite fruits are grapes” or “favorite fruit is grapes”

I think I understood the general idea of fruits vs fruit, but what about the situation where you're saying: "My favorite fruits are grape"? This made me cringe when I saw it in an English course ...
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2answers
162 views

Is “between __ or __” valid?

Today I heard somebody say: This (technology) can be the difference between life or death. And I winced.  While “life or death” can be used as an adjective (e.g., modifying “situation” or ...
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3answers
92 views

What is the correct grammar: “we” or “us”

What is the correct grammar for this sentence fragment: "She needed we the taxpayers to pay...." "She needed us the taxpayers to pay...." because without "the taxpayers", the correct sentence would ...
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0answers
25 views

What is correct: using myself or I? [duplicate]

What is correct: we are waiting on dinner for myself and Jamie, or, we are waiting on dinner for Jamie and I?
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3answers
5k views

Which is right — “all the three” or “all three” in a situation of specific objects?

Let's imagine, I'm speaking about someone's three specific cars, which are over there, there, and there. Now I'm saying that I have installed a new sound system in all of them. Which is right: ...
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3answers
211 views

Identifying the subject of a sentence

Please could you tell me the subject of the sentence below? Is it 'He' or 'she'? Thanks. He believes she went to London.
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1answer
1k views

May I pay “in cash” or just “cash” without in?

What is the right phrase - May I pay "in cash" or may I "pay cash"?
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2answers
60 views

“When once they had done this, …” - what's with “when once”?

From George Orwell's 1984, part 2 chapter 9: For if leisure and security were enjoyed by all alike, the great mass of human beings who are normally stupefied by poverty would become literate and ...
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3answers
44 views

Certain and inseperable results: is the phrasing “Make for yourself inevitabilities reality” valid? [closed]

Make effort towards your goals, which at present seem improbable, until they become inevitable. I wish to mean this, is "Make for yourself inevitabilities reality." valid? I would understand it when ...
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2answers
53 views

“What time” vs “At what time”

If I want ask my classmate at what exact time did he come to class, which question is correct? I don't want to use "When". "At what time did you come here?" or "What time did you come here?"
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1answer
64 views

Is the sentence grammer correct? “During the meeting that … , I had …”? [closed]

"During the meeting that Dr. Edward Smith coordinated last month, I had the chance to meet with you and hear the possible projects ..." English is my second language, and I usually feel that my ...
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2answers
22 views

“After n years” or “n years down the line”?

I am planning to work at a firm X and after 5 years down the line I would like to work at Y. Is after 5 years down the line grammatically correct or it should be just "after 5 years" or "5 years down ...
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3answers
193 views

Does “Pursue Impossible” Make Grammatical Sense?

My university recently pushed a campaign for their new rebrand, and their tagline is "Pursue Impossible". I have seen a few adjectives used as nouns before but all had a definite article in front. ...
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3answers
42 views

Using the word “by” before “whom”

I read the following sentence in a newspaper about a restaurateur's reasons for abolishing tipping: "Many of the owners other reasons sound like the typical complaints of British tourists, who are ...
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1answer
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Was “an unicorn” ever correct?

According to Biblehub and Bible Gateway, King James's Numbers 23:22 says: God brought them out of Egypt; he hath as it were the strength of an unicorn. I don't have a hard copy to check. Is that ...
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2answers
18k views

Correct usage of “viz.”?

Are these two sentences examples of the correct use of "viz."? This book is dedicated to my family, viz. my parents and two sisters. The purpose of this book is twofold, viz. 1) to show that [...]; ...
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2answers
65 views

Is it formal to say “I've met people I was able to connect with”? [closed]

I would like to say the following: "During my daily work I’ve met many interesting people I was able to connect with." Is this right in a formal way? What I would like to say is that I did ...
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0answers
23 views

Does the comma make the meaning of the sentence clearer?

Sir Roger Moore exemplifies James Bond's personality, off-screen. My concern is that if there was no comma in the sentence, it would mean something like this: James Bond's personality off-screen is ...
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2answers
2k views

“I hope it will be useful for you like” + verb

I'm writing down few notes about a technical argument, I'm doing it also to understand them better, so in my intro I'm saying: If you are reading this, I hope it will be useful for you like ...
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1answer
52 views

“How much is faster the train than the car?” [closed]

How much is faster the train than the car? How much is the train faster than the car? Which one is correct?
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1answer
1k views

'Work hard at it' or 'work hard for it'. Which is grammatically correct?

Some people dream of success, while others wake up and work hard at it. My friend and I got into a little argument over which is correct. He says 'work hard at it' is correct. I disagreed and ...
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1answer
71 views

Can you ask “What is the meaning of your question” [closed]

It's not my native language But if you're asked a question can you answer with a question something like so "What is the meaning of your question" does that sound right?
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1answer
66 views

Is using frequent irregular sentences acceptable in writing books? [closed]

I am editing a friend's story, and he constantly has sentences with no verbs or subjects, which he defends as being an accepted literary style. I'm not bothered by one or two, but every page seems to ...
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1answer
45 views

Present continuous form for oblique subject

Someone told me that the following is not correct: May the blessings of god always shower on you and should be May the blessings of god always be showered on you. My friend's argument is ...