Grammaticality refers to whether something obeys the rules of grammar for English.

learn more… | top users | synonyms (1)

4
votes
2answers
618 views

Can you say “and so, he was deserved of his sorry fate”?

Can you say and so, he was deserved of his sorry fate ? Would you pronounce deserved as deserve-ed, as is commonly done in poetic language?
1
vote
1answer
57 views

Is ”what there is a reason to do” a valid construct?

From page 76 of Frederick Schauer’s Thinking Like a Lawyer: What there is a reason to do is different from what should be done, all things considered, just as what there is a right to do is ...
1
vote
4answers
175 views

What's wrong with my use of “anyone” and “their” in this sentence? [duplicate]

For a paper that I have to write for school, I have the following sentence* that my teacher claims is incorrect. I am not sure what is incorrect about it, but it has something to do with my usage of ...
1
vote
1answer
71 views

Is “Were there cattle on the road?” grammatically correct?

Is Were there cattle on the road? grammatically correct? What is the rule regarding the usage of was and were around collective nouns ?
0
votes
2answers
833 views

Can a sentence start with “ due to”

I think a sentence cannot start with due to. But if i need to say due to this thing something is happening how can I say it? How can I write the following sentence correctly? Due to the changes ...
1
vote
1answer
383 views

Sentence patterns: There are 16 ways to “leave” your book

Playing around in my head with the different positions that a subject, verb, direct object, and indirect object can be positioned in one sentence, I ended up with 16 sentences using only the simple ...
-2
votes
3answers
80 views

“Inconvenient” vs. “uncomfortable” [closed]

Which of the following is correct? It's uncomfortable to live there due to poor housing conditions. It's inconvenient to live there due to poor housing conditions.
-1
votes
2answers
44 views

Grammaticality of “Do you know why this works this way?” [closed]

Is the following sentence grammatically correct? Do you know why this works this way? It looked a bit suspicious to me, so I googled it — to find only four results. If the sentence above is ...
1
vote
1answer
176 views

“There is” vs “there are”?

I wrote an essay and returned it to my teacher who told me that it was perfect except for that one mistake with the usage of there are: There are currently 192 218 546 ways to set up..." She ...
-1
votes
1answer
68 views

'Having been' verb third form, 'having been having' [closed]

There is the tittle milk in the jug because of my cow! Having been distributed it wouldn't not, having been gathered it wouldn't not! I have been having difficulties understanding these words for ...
0
votes
1answer
128 views

Can you end a sentence with 'hence'?

Pretentiousness/archaism aside, does the sentence Any changes that were made have been detailed hence. make sense? The context would be that the descriptions of changes would be found in the ...
3
votes
3answers
121 views

“I belong to a greater stage”

Is it okay to say: I believe I belong to a greater stage. Basically, I want to say that I want to transit from my current position to a better one since I think I am skillful enough for the ...
2
votes
2answers
61 views

Removing “who were” in “The park was empty except for a group of people who were stretching” [duplicate]

Can I remove who were in the sentence below? The park was empty except for a group of elderly people who were stretching, jogging, and doing Tai Chi Is it still grammatical?
21
votes
6answers
8k views

Using “And” at the beginning of a sentence

Since I first learned English, I have been holding this understanding that "and", as a conj. but unlike "but", can only connect two clauses, not two sentences ended with periods. But recently, I ...
0
votes
0answers
30 views

Can “a-mingle” be a verb in imperative mood?

In the last lines of "Jingle Bells Rock": Jingle bell time is a swell time To go gliding in a one-horse sleigh Giddy-up jingle horse, pick up your feet Jingle around the clock ...
1
vote
5answers
4k views

“Introduce person to object” or “introduce object to person”?

I'd like to introduce you to this technology. I'd like to introduce this tech to you. Which one is right and what are appropriate uses?
8
votes
3answers
5k views

“All our X” vs. “all of our X”

Is the word "of" optional in this instance? Is either of these considered preferable to the other? Taste all our delicious treats. Taste all of our delicious treats.
0
votes
1answer
30 views

Is 'action this matter' a correct phrase? [duplicate]

Is 'action this matter' a correct phrase? Is it correct to say "Pls check with Mr. X to ascertain whether his team or we should action this matter."
4
votes
7answers
6k views

Is “yesterday night” acceptable? [duplicate]

I catch a lot of grief about this from family and friends, so I figured I'd settle the score once and for all. In verbal context (though not written), I tend to use the phrase ... yesterday ...
0
votes
3answers
72 views

Identifying the subject of a sentence

Please could you tell me the subject of the sentence below? Is it 'He' or 'she'? Thanks. He believes she went to London.
1
vote
3answers
1k views

How is “all your data are belong to US” grammatically correct? [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: “All your commas are belong to Array” and similar — is this grammar form “proper”? What's the necessity of "are" before "belong" in this ...
7
votes
4answers
609 views

“Highest building of/in the world”

Which is correct? The Chrysler building was the highest building in the world. Today, it is the seventh highest building in the USA. or: The Chrysler building was the highest building of ...
0
votes
1answer
83 views

“It is about time I had a family” - Is this sentence grammatically correct?

Recently, I stumbled over a sentence that read: "I am 30. It is about time I had a family of my own". Is it grammatically correct? Shouldn't the correct sentence be "I am 30. It is about time I ...
18
votes
4answers
36k views
5
votes
4answers
67k views

“I would like to ask you a favour” vs. “I would like to ask you for a favour”

Which form is to be preferred? I would like to ask you a favour. I would like to ask you for a favour.
0
votes
1answer
42 views

“will be all present” or “will all be present”

Which one do we use for this sentence : Student chairs will all be present for this meeting or "will be all present"
0
votes
0answers
55 views

Is it correct to say “X is a Y, doing Z”?

Not sure how to best put this in words, but I'll give an example below. This is from a boilerplate text of a company: ABC is a manufacturing company, partnering with DEF to... I would be ...
10
votes
4answers
7k views

“Are either of you free?”

In the process of writing to two people I typed: "Are either of you free?" and was immediately called out by my grammar checker which suggested I should write: "Is either of you free?" The second of ...
0
votes
3answers
804 views

“Had been engaged when they married” vs. “were married” vs. “had married”

Which of the sentences below are grammatically correct? The couple had been engaged for five years when they married. The couple had been engaged for five years when they were married. The ...
19
votes
8answers
1k views

Is “The MSO/MSE Split is soon underway” grammatically correct?

We're in the middle of a historical time. Two creatures will be separated from each other. Waffles will be torn in two. Meta Stack Overflow will be split. This banner is currently being shown on Meta ...
3
votes
1answer
749 views

Inversion with “many times” at the beginning of a sentence

I am having a discussion with my friend. I said, "Many times I have seen him washing his car." He says it should be, "Many times have I seen him washing his car. Much like "Often do I see him", and ...
1
vote
2answers
86 views

“Why does he not?” or “Why does not he?” and why? [duplicate]

Which is the more correct form: Why does he not? Why does not he? and why? At first blush 1 would seem to be grammatical - just on an intuitive judgement. However 2 logically seems as ...
0
votes
4answers
7k views

Is it grammatically correct to say “Many more happy returns of the day ”?

Many people greet me "Many more happy returns of the day" on my birthday. I thought it is grammatically wrong. Can we use "many" and "more" at a time in a sentence. I thought that it is correct to ...
0
votes
1answer
56 views

Interested in him learning French - with accusative 'him' [duplicate]

Good morning everyone! Is it correct to say " I' m interested in him learning French in the future"?
2
votes
1answer
131 views

The grammar of 'clothes' versus 'clothing'

Which of these is correct: I didn't realize how much clothes you had on the floor I didn't realize how much clothing you had on the floor Any additional explanation about clothes versus ...
22
votes
3answers
8k views

When is a gerund supposed to be preceded by a possessive pronoun?

I assume that the following sentences are grammatically correct: He resents your being more popular than he is. Most of the members paid their dues without my asking them. They objected ...
0
votes
4answers
260 views

“He walks as if he is drunk.” Grammatically correct ? Any difference in meaning from “…as if he were drunk.”?

Is it grammatically correct to use an indicative verb after "as if", or "as though" for that matter? I've heard someone say: "He walks as if he is drunk." Would there have been any difference ...
0
votes
1answer
42 views

“have/has condition” or “need condition”

Yesterday, I put a message in a social network environment to inform other members about lottery: "Lottery for year 2016 is now open, try your chance. It does not have any especial condition." But a ...
1
vote
3answers
128 views

“From lines 10 to 15” or “from line 10 to line 15”?

In an academic text, I need to explain a section of a computer program. This section extends from line 10 to line 15 in the code. Is the following way to refer to these lines gramatically correct? ...
0
votes
0answers
82 views

Is the term, gone from blank to blank, academically acceptable?

Is the term, gone from (blank) to (blank), academically acceptable? If not what alternatives are there to state the same thing in a more precise manner?
4
votes
2answers
156 views

“If a man write a better book, preach a better sermon…”

There is an old quotation attributed to Ralph Waldo Emerson: If a man write a better book, preach a better sermon, or make a better mouse-trap than his neighbour, tho' he build his house in the ...
8
votes
4answers
1k views

Is “breaths” grammatically correct?

In some books, I see the use of the word "breaths" in the phrase "they held their breaths". Is this correct? And if it is, should I go by the Ngram (below) in spite of grammaticality? Or are both ...
3
votes
4answers
12k views

Formal way to wish good morning

I am not a native English speaker, the source of my learning is books, websites and of course movies and music. In the movie — if I remember the name correctly — The Last Samurai, I heard that they ...
4
votes
3answers
2k views

How to understand “It takes a little bit of getting used to the idea…”?

The following sentence is from a mathematical lecture note here: It takes a little bit of getting used to the idea of a function that cannot actually be evaluated at any specific point, but with ...
1
vote
3answers
79 views

What is a sentence fragment? [closed]

"All of them, that is, but Storm." Is the above line a sentence fragment, and if so, why? Thanks.
0
votes
2answers
67 views

Is “The mall is constructing” grammatically correct? [closed]

Is this sentence grammatically correct: "The mall is constructing".? I know that we use "The mall is being constructed" in passive, but I want to know that can I write "The mall is constructing". Is ...
9
votes
8answers
14k views

Is “a wide range of features” singular or plural?

In the office, we've been having a discussion about the grammar in a sentence and have differing opinions about what is right and what is wrong... It is a very minor issue but is still bugging me :) ...
2
votes
4answers
97 views

“The set is empty and [is] ordered”

Which is correct? The set is empty and is ordered. The set is empty and ordered.
1
vote
2answers
1k views

Can a sentence have two verbs of same type - for example “is”?

I found the following sentence in a book. A good way of figuring out what a function is doing is to type it without the parentheses. Is this correct way of writing? Thanks.
1
vote
1answer
96 views

Is the sentence “Success is determined by how you are determined to succeed” wrong?

I understand that the better form of the sentence would be: Success is determined by how determined you are to succeed. but is the sentence I wrote wrong or ungrammatical?