Grammaticality refers to whether something obeys the rules of grammar for English.

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“I myself Naresh” as an introduction

I have heard so many times that before starting presentation people introduce themselves like this: I myself Naresh and the topic I am going to present is.... Myself Naresh and the topic I am ...
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61 views

“Thanks for VERB + ing” vs. “Thanks to VERB”: which is correct? [closed]

Should I use Thanks for being here or Thanks to be here? I have read that the first one is correct. However, I am not sure about these usages. Please tell me which one is correct and why it is ...
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1answer
31 views

X could be manipulated and Y [could be?] compromised

The sentence in question is: It is highly improbable that a typical user would understand all the potentially invasive ways in which their data could be manipulated, and their autonomy ...
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2k views

“Sally broke her leg” vs. “Sally has broken her leg” Does switching the past simple with the present perfect affect its meaning?

Earlier today I had a private lesson with an Italian student—intermediate level, who has been studying the present perfect vs. past simple tense. His teacher had given him an exercise where a list of ...
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42 views

“Preventing them to wrap” vs “Preventing them from wrapping”

I've found on StackOverflow an old answer written by me, in which I've used the first form. Reading it now, it sounds weird and wrong; I am inclined to think that the second form is the only one ...
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5answers
213 views

“Either your dog or your cat eats” vs. “Either your dog or cat eats”

Version (1) seems correct to me, but I cannot explain why it is correct grammatically. Could someone explain please? Either your dog or your cat eats my garbage. Either your dog or cat eats ...
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2answers
62 views

“The only factor considered” — no subject?

Is All this goes to show that the strength and presentation of an argument should not be the only factor considered when evaluating proposals and making decisions. grammatically correct? Or ...
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1answer
102 views

Something happens because clause A, and clause B.

I wonder whether because can introduce two or even more reasons; if yes, how they are connected. For example, John came late because he woke up late, and his bicycle was broken. Is the sentence ...
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51 views

“X is subject to Y” or “X is subjected to Y”?

As with the current group term life insurance coverage these two new benefits are also considered to be non-cash taxable benefits and are subjected to statutory deductions for C\QPP contributions, ...
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2answers
74 views

Is the expression 'What's one say?' corrent?

I've just heard an unfamiliar phrase from a video: What's the driver say? At first, I thought I just couldn't follow what the actor said but I confirmed that what I had heard was right from the ...
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1answer
108 views

a few days every month usage

"A few days every month, he goes cycling." Is the noun phrase "a few days every month" acting as an adverb to "goes" in the above sentence? There is no preposition before the noun phrase "a few ...
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23 views

Is it grammatical to combine present perfect progressive tense with a present perfect tense in one sentence?

Consider this: If you have been visiting your church lately, you have probably read the new dress code policy posted near the lobby.
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61 views

Do I need to use “from” after “graduated”?

I graduated high school. I graduated from high school. Which sentence is grammatically correct?
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40 views

Why is the phrase “less than 15 people” incorrect? [duplicate]

Why is the phrase less than 15 people incorrect? I just heard a radio personality flipping out over this usage.
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9answers
4k views

Is “rather” shifting to become a verb?

In colloquial English, I constantly run across sentences of the form: I rather my [noun] [verb] A quick Google search returns tons of examples: I rather my opponents don't find out. I ...
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1answer
83 views

Ways to use 'both' in a specific sentence

Which of these sentences are grammatically correct? Are there even more ways to write the correct ones? Although I'd really like an analysis of why each sentence is correct or wrong, I would be ...
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1answer
9k views

“Broadcast” or “broadcasted”

I'm not a native English speaker, so sorry if this is a very basic question. Is broadcast a verb? If it is, what is the simple past and past participle: broadcasted?
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23 views

Should I say : “is” or “does”? [migrated]

Is/Does the file exists? Are/Do aliens exist? I think I should use do, but there is some case I should use is? Also, does that mean something if I use is?
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3answers
5k views

“Describe with” vs. “describe by”

I'm not entirely certain about when it is most appropriate to use with and by, respectively. An example should clarify my problem: We describe the input with an exponential function. or We ...
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29 views

'That is' versus 'That was' [migrated]

Here's an example of what's puzzling me (I'll use a brother/sister arguing example): Sister - I couldn't find my homework, so I got an F on the assignment. Brother - You couldn't find your homework ...
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1answer
1k views

Nationalities - When do we use the singular or plural form

I always have doubts whether to use a singular or a plural noun when I refer to certain peoples. For example, we say Americans, Italians, Brazilians, Russians and Austrians. But we say The British, ...
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5answers
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Is “a whole nother” grammatical?

Often one will hear the phrase that's a whole nother kettle of fish, but is "nother" actually grammatical? If not, what would the correct way of saying it be?
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2answers
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Usage of neither in a sentence [closed]

Is the sentence "Neither of Jack and Jill is present here" correct? I want to use "neither" and "and" in a sentence.
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50 views

Are quotation marks necessary?

For 8th grade recognition all students selected a quote they like. Is is necessary to put in quotation marks? The authors are acknowledged and the section is titled QUOTES.
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infinitive after say

In Modern English, vol 2, P.120, it reads the object infinitives have the subject of the main verb as their subject. However, in Longman and Oxford, there are two collocation examples- NINA SAID TO ...
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73 views

How should I interpret “Be different like that”? [closed]

Be different like that! What does it mean? Is it grammatically correct? I don't think it has any problems, but I am not sure.
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3answers
118 views

Should “ we studied it both on- and off-site” have both hyphens?

Should the phrase "we studied it both on- and off-site" have both hyphens? Or would "we studied it both onsite and offsite" be better?
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1answer
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Controversy over verb choice in “neither you nor I {is/am/are} in control”

I was watching the film A Game of Shadows starring Robert Downey Junior and Jude Law when this line came up, "...neither you nor I is in control..." (I can’t remember the exact words that ended the ...
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2answers
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Which tense is (more) correct in this sentence, the present perfect or past simple?

The sentence is: "These investigations have seen several officials arrested." I'm not sure which tense I should use, the present perfect here seems more natural to me but I can't seem to find a rule ...
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79 views

Indian English: Is this a correct sentence? [closed]

Is this a correct sentence in Indian English? It is not very long when my sister will finish their graduation.
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1answer
98 views

Which one is grammatically correct: “wood door” or “wooden door”

I have a grammar which says that: "The 'noun+noun' structure is normally used to say what things are made of." "A few pairs of nouns and adjectives are used as modifiers with different meanings. ...
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1answer
119 views

“Don't you…” question

I'm studying English for 10 months. I suppose myself to know it quite well now. But I'm confused about one thing. I noticed that some of my English speaking friends sometimes ask "Don't you ...
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1answer
38 views

“weaker” or “more weak”? [closed]

Which is grammatically correct?: She has become weaker lately. She has become more weak lately.
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1answer
87 views

Can 'surgery' be a count noun in the sense of 'medical procedure'?

This is something that has bothered me for a long time. Several years ago a remember noticing in the media a shift from using "An operation" to "A surgery" when talking about someone who was ...
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2answers
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Appropriate preposition to go with “concerned”

He is deeply concerned for vulnerable children. Is this correct? Or is there a better preposition to use instead of for? What exactly does this phrase mean? What about "He is deeply concerned ...
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Please help me to understand if this sentence is correct [closed]

Please make sure that you selected all file (For when the upload box is empty.)
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Is “who all is” grammatically correct?

I often tend to say something like Who all is coming to the movies? And my friends correct me that I should be saying Who all are coming to the movies? So which one is correct?
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1answer
70 views

Which one is grammatically correct, with “the” or without “the”? Why? [closed]

An Introduction to the History and Principles of Heraldry. An Introduction to History and Principles of Heraldry. Which one is grammatically correct, with "the" or without "the"? Why?
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1answer
47 views

Meaning and Emphasis Depending on the Placement of “Only” [duplicate]

My dog only likes people food. My dog likes only people food. My dog likes people food only. In each of these sentences, how does "only" affect it (i.e. emphasis and meaning)? Are any ...
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3answers
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“I haven't got” vs. “I don't have”

Which is the correct way of saying this in English? I haven't got any money. I don't have any money. If both are correct, which is the difference between them?
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3answers
258 views

Is “Are” always used with plural verbs/nouns? [duplicate]

Examples: There's six seasons, dude. Wouldn't it be: There're six seasons, dude. We are talking about multiple items; six seasons. If we refer to multiple items, we should use "Are" in ...
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7answers
10k views

Can “cattle” be singular?

I've grown up on a farm, and my dad and his dad, apparently, always used "cattle" to refer to both the singular and plural forms of the domestic bovine. I've always assumed it's how the word "deer" ...
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8answers
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Which is correct, “you and I” or “you and me”?

When the phrase is used as an object, why so many native speakers are saying "you and I" instead of "you and me"? I'm not a native speaker but I thought "you and me" is correct. Not sure if this falls ...
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2answers
15k views

“Studying PhD at the university” or “studying PhD in the university”?

Which of these two sentences is correct: I am studying PhD at the university. I am studying PhD in the university. Should I use "at" or "in"? Or is there no difference?
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1answer
13k views

Plural of table leaf

In the context of a table leaf, what is the correct plural term, "table leafs" or "table leaves"?
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1answer
82 views

Can you start a sentence with “Hopefully,…”? [duplicate]

I am studying for the SAT, and I learned just now that the following sentence is grammatically incorrect: Hopefully, we will be able to complete the building before the rainy season sets in. ...
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11answers
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Can a sentence start with “Because”?

In my grade school days, I recall a teacher proclaiming to the class: You should never start a sentence with the word "Because". Of course, I've since seen lots of examples to the contrary, and ...
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2answers
54 views

What does “in forming a human being” mean?

I just want to understand what the speaker meant in this sentence. I think there is nothing more important in forming a human being than your family.
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3answers
69 views

Correct use of 'comprise'

Is this sentence grammatically correct? "The application site comprises an existing care home which has 59 bedrooms and 85 registered bed spaces" I was under the impression that 'comprise' would ...