Grammaticality refers to whether something obeys the rules of grammar for English.

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143 views

“To mentor someone during a project” vs. “to mentor someone on a project”

..., whom I mentored during his final semester's project. ..., whom I mentored on his final semester's project. Which of these two is grammatically correct? Since I am not talking about ...
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2answers
119 views

I can speak a little bit of German

I was asked to introduce myself and what languages I spoke. So I mentioned all the languages I know and in the end, I added "... and I can speak a little bit of German" After I said that, I was ...
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5answers
5k views

Using “And” at the beginning of a sentence

Since I first learned English, I have been holding this understanding that "and", as a conj. but unlike "but", can only connect two clauses, not two sentences ended with periods. But recently, I ...
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4answers
273 views

The expression “not so much”

I have noticed the appearance of the phrase "not so much" in the language recently. It strikes me as both grammatically incorrect and humorous when used. For example,"Jim is very smart; his brother, ...
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1answer
23 views

“The horizontal and vertical transfers” vs. “the horizontal and the vertical transfers” [duplicate]

The Horizontal and vertical tranfers in Local Governement Is this fragment grammatically correct?
2
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5answers
376 views

“Have some reason you” or “Have some reason why you”

Can the "why" be removed from the phrase "have some reason why you?" Example: Do you have some reason you ____? vs. Do you have some reason why you ____? Are these both grammatically ...
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2answers
66 views

Difference between “all the” and simply “all” [duplicate]

In a mail from my professor, I read you need to specify all the fields. Here, he gave us a form with about 25 fields. He asked us to fill out the fields. I'm skeptical about the usage of the ...
2
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3answers
4k views

Using “and” twice in a list

About using and, I've learned it is usually used in lists, between the last two items. For example: I like movies, traveling and going out with friends. Please tell me if the use of and ...
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3answers
3k views

“… things like this.” vs. “… things like that.”

Yesterday on talk radio an interviewee speaking about Sudanese Northerner's being forced into the mountains and away from their farmlands by the Sudanese Army said the result was: The men would ...
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2answers
9k views

“situation where” vs. “situation in which”

In my mother tongue I can use the word where not only to describe something connected to a location, but also to substitute in which. My question is: Is it correct to use where in a sentence like ...
4
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2answers
130 views

“I would like that he was normal”; is this sentence correct?

I would like that he was normal. This sounds a little awkward but plausible. Is it valid English? How about another example: I would like that he bathed before going to sleep. It sounds a ...
3
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1answer
67 views

Are both “from the offset” and “from the outset” correct?

I had always seen that phrase as "from the outset", but recently I saw somebody writing "from the offset" (meaning "from the beginning"). Dictionary.com claims that "offset" can be a synonym for ...
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5answers
1k views

Is the “an” rule applied when a sum of money is in between? [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: When should I use “a” vs “an”? I have recently seen this image: Should "a" have been used instead of "an" in the "...an $100,000 apartment" ...
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1answer
396 views

Can “nor” be used without “neither”?

I came across this sentence: Cummings Motors, Smith Electric nor our subcontractors can be held liable. Is this a proper use of the word nor? I can understand Neither Cummings Motors nor ...
3
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1answer
4k views

The difference between “have a lunch” and “have lunch”

Is there any difference between I am not having a lunch tomorrow. and I am not having lunch tomorrow. This is a follow up question of : About the use of future tense.
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5answers
6k views

Future tense in conditional clauses

All the textbooks I have ever come across during the course of my studying English emphasize that future tense should not be used in conditional clauses. For example, If it rains in the evening, ...
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7answers
3k views

… is done in agreement with xxx?

Background: I'm writing a professional (technical) report in which I want to express the following in one simple sentence: The whole report is written based on a certain assumption, except one part ...
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2answers
25k views

“Any” followed by singular or plural countable nouns?

This question has troubled me for ages despite my several attempts of looking it up in dictionaries or usage books. Do we say, "Do you have any ideas" or "Do you have any idea"? I do see an example ...
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5answers
324 views

Question Regarding Possessives with ('s) and (of) [duplicate]

Question: Is the first one redundant and proper, or is it redundant and not necessarily correct? (1) He is a friend of Doug's. (2) He is a friend of Doug.
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1answer
52 views

I'll get lost tomorrow?

Is the following sentence correct? I'll get lost tomorrow. Mom asked if I have plans of exploring the city alone tomorrow. The city is really new to me and I don't mind if I lost myself ...
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1answer
58 views

Why isn't there a verb following can? [closed]

I have read a sentence in America Scientist (May 2014, p45): No longer can skeptical clinicians dismiss the approach as likely to be viable for only a few specific kinds of tumors... Why isn't ...
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2answers
5k views

Is “have/has lead to” OK?

I found a set of examples where I expect led instead of lead. In recent years the rise in the crime rate has lead to increased concern on the part of both the police and the general public. ...
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2answers
69 views

Is it ok to say “mutually practice together”?

Is it correct to say This way we can mutually practice together. Since mutually has already been mentioned, is it correct if I use the word together at the end? It may be redundant, but is ...
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1answer
260 views

Indefinite article before country name [closed]

We all wish for a Nigeria that provides and takes care of this countrymen. Is the indefinite article grammatical?
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17answers
3k views

What is the player called who has a turn?

What is the player called who has a turn? I am guessing something like turning player. But I would like some confirmation or maybe is there an idiom for it? Explanation: In a round based game what ...
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4answers
11k views

When should we use “and” and/or “and/or”?

What's the difference between "and" and "and/or"? How do we decide whether to use one or the other? Note: Also it would be great if someone could explain how do we actually pronounce "and/or" ...
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4answers
5k views

What's wrong with “I'll open you the door”?

When I call the buzzer outside my girlfriend's flat, she sometimes says *"I'll open you the door". I correct this to "I'll open the door for you". I've never heard a native speaker say it the first ...
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3answers
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“I'm home” or “I'm at home”

The second form looks more correct to me, but the first expression is present in several titles of movies and songs. Which form is preferable?
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1answer
73 views

“Of which many” vs “many of which” as parenthetical modifiers

The houses on Canal street, of which many had been damaged in the storm, looked abandoned. Is the modifier "of which many... storm" correct? I know that "on canal street" is a prepositional ...
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4answers
115 views

Should it be 'which affect' or 'who affect'? [closed]

I have this sentence Persons performing tasks which affect product quality should have appropriate skill and knowledge. in which I am not sure whether who or which is grammatically correct.
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1answer
54 views

“going to” in conditionals [closed]

If you said 'no', I would call your parents" = If you said 'no', I am going to call your parents OR If you said 'no', I was going to call your parents If you had said 'no', I would have called ...
3
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1answer
111 views

“Four years are” vs. “four years is” [duplicate]

An exam question is driving me crazy. Find the mistake in the following: Four years are a long time to spend away from family and friends. Literally everyone solved it by replacing are with ...
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1answer
39 views

Am I using the semicolon correctly in this example? [closed]

When school is over and got nothing to do; wouldn't it be better if you could do something with your friends or family?
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3answers
68 views

Should we repeat the verb after “rather than”?

Super AMOLED Plus uses a traditional RGB RGB (3 subpixels) arrangement typically used in LCD displays rather than the PenTile RGBG pixel matrix (2 subpixels) used in Super AMOLED. or Super ...
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1answer
90 views

“I had my house [be] burned down”

I have found out that using the verb be in passive constructions such as: I had my house be burned down is incorrect, therefore it should be I had my house burned down. But is it ...
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4answers
105 views

Position of “yet” in a causative sentence

If I have to write a causative sentence in Present Perfect, where should I put yet, at the end of the question or right after the negation? She hasn't had her doors mended by the carpenter yet. ...
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7answers
10k views

Is “I am sat” bad English?

Is "I am sat" bad English? I believe it is incorrect and instead either the present continuous I am sitting or the predicate adjective I am seated should be used. I hear this quite often, ...
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1answer
45 views

What to use : “that” or “who”? [duplicate]

Consider this sentence : "I was going down the hill and on my step down I saw a guy who appeared to be disguised". "I was going down the hill and on my step down I saw a guy that appeared to be ...
3
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2answers
4k views

“Justification of” or “justification for”?

Do "justification of" or "justification for" mean different things? Is one more appropriate than the other?
3
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3answers
29k views

Which past tense of “to light” should I use here?

I know that there are two ways to form the past tense of to light (i.e. lit/lighted). Which one is appropriate for the sentence below? His thoughts lighted our way. or His thoughts lit our ...
0
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2answers
83 views

English Article [duplicate]

I have come across a sentence where 'Niagara Falls' is used without an article. I seem to remember that there is a basic rule of the English language that there should be an article before any ...
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5answers
455 views

“I'm Spanish” or “I'm a Spanish”?

Which one is correct? I am quite sure about "I'm Spanish", but is it wrong if I add an "a" before "Spanish"?
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13answers
8k views

I can run faster than _____. (1) him (2) he?

Consider the sentence "I can run faster than 15 miles per hour." Its meaning is clear and to my eyes obviously grammatically correct. Now let me present some variations that have given me trouble for ...
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0answers
44 views

looking for appositive that-which phrases

I asked sentences having an appositive that-which phrase like the following sentence in English Language Learners. The insect propagates best near "disturbed land," that which is being cultivated ...
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2answers
46 views

anything / everything but

With reference to a commonly bad behaviour (e.g. corruption), may I write/say: "it seems to be everything but an Italian bad habit only!"?
3
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1answer
74 views

Usage of “What does who want?”

I have stumbled upon the phrase "What does who want?" which puzzles me. Its unusualness makes me doubt. I have been told it is used just as "What does he want?", with [who] replacing [he] when we ...
2
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4answers
75 views

“Looks more genuine than me/I writing”

In the following sentence, which is more appropriate — I or me, and why? Sending separate mails will look more genuine than me/I writing on behalf of everyone.
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7answers
34k views

What is the difference between “nothing but”, “anything but”, and “everything but”?

What is the difference between these phrases? When is it valid to use which? Should they be avoided as being ambiguous?
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2answers
49 views

Use of the word Refrained

'The experience of negative emotions in the flow of life can never be stopped, only refrained!' Is this sentence grammatically wrong since the preposition 'from' does not follow the word refrained?
2
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3answers
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Could the sentence “Not even death can do us part” be considered correct?

Not even death can do us part. These are lyrics from the Beyoncé song "Sweet Dreams" (link to the part in question.) I've been curious about this for a while. If one considers "Till death do us ...