Grammaticality refers to whether something obeys the rules of grammar for English.

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When to use “myself” or “me” [duplicate]

Which is grammatically correct? "Request you to register me for the course" "Request you to register myself for the course"
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1answer
44 views

Would you guys change the following sentence suitable for my cover letter? [closed]

I need your help guys:) I am applying for an instructor position at a university in the States. Would you please change the following statement appropriate for my cover letter? "My bachelor's degree ...
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39 views

“Myself” as a single subject

How do we use myself as the only subject of a sentence? For example I once heard some people saying Myself am to be blamed. Is this grammatically correct? How is it different from I am to be blamed? ...
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158 views

“I went to the hotel you were staying at” vs. “you stayed at”

Is there a difference in meaning between these two sentences? I went to the hotel you were staying at when you were in New York. I went to the hotel you stayed  at when you were in New York. ...
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1answer
96 views

Singular or plural form of verb [closed]

Which of two following sentences is correct? Depending on whether a birth or a death occurs , we have... Depending on whether a birth or a death occur, we have... Update I changed the title.
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0answers
29 views

“Cannot be let to rely on” [migrated]

When I think of what I want to express, it naturaly comes as the following sentence: Self/peer assessment report - This evidence has least value and cannot be let to rely on, because... Is it ...
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1answer
48 views

Possessive apostrophe for owner of owner of owner of

I've read Preferred way to apostrophise in case of dual or multiple ownership by distinct entities and "Nikki's and Alice's X" vs. "Nikki and Alice's X", but my ...
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56 views

Is the participle clause in “the marlin left a blood trail attracting sharks” correct? [closed]

I'm writing a summary of the novel "The old man and the sea". And I'm trying to use participle clauses (a subject that I'm currently learning). I've learnt that you can use a participle clause to ...
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1answer
48 views

Asking a “Do you have…” question without do-support

Is the following sentence correct English? Have you the address? The address in question is obvious to the person being asked. It's normal to ask such a question as "Do you have the address?" ...
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55 views

Is the phrase “Best of luck ahead! ” grammatically correct?

"Best of luck for your future ahead!" - can this phrase be shortened to "Best of luck ahead!".
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344 views

Is “He don't mean it” correct? [duplicate]

When I was reading the book Because of Winn-Dixie, on page 89 I found a paragraph as follows: "Oh, lay off her," Dunlap said to Stevie. Then he turned to me. "He don't mean it," he said. Can ...
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3answers
173 views

'I thought', 'I would think', 'I would have thought'

I'm going to show you three examples. 1. A - Have you got any change?     B - Do I have change? What for?     A - For the vending machine! ...
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38 views

Should I use activity or activities

I want to say something like "the antibacterial activity of these three drugs is the same". I am not sure whether i should use activity or activities in the above sentence, since three drugs are ...
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2answers
43 views

Is it correct to use “for” with “required”?

I am editing a sentence that is of the form: A has required for B to effect a change. To my ear, this sounds better: A has required that B effect a change. Am I wrong in my dislike of "has ...
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4answers
90 views

What's the difference between “although” and “even-if”

What is the difference between the following sentences: You may be prevented from crossing the border, although you are in possession of a valid visa. You may be prevented from crossing the border, ...
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4answers
109 views

Is there an implied verb missing?

Is this statement correct? - However catastrophic the physical abuse, the lasting scars came from the verbal insults that had been hurled at them. Does the first part of the sentence before the ...
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0answers
122 views

Subject/Complement Agreement. How to describe problem with “The thing is the objects.”

In my ell answer, version 32, I provided the following, problematic, wording (especially bold italic), and I need help to better understand this issue so I can fix my answer:1 The thing is ...
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7answers
3k views

Can a person happen? Is “Zodanga happened” correct?

I was watching movie John Carter where there was some dialogue like this: — What happened here? — Zodanga happened. Here Zodanga was a bad guy in the movie. I don't understand how a guy ...
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1answer
70 views

Who is one God and the one Mediator? [closed]

This is a passage from a book of the Bible: 1 Timothy Chapter 2 1 Exhort therefore, that, first of all, supplications, prayers, intercessions, and giving of thanks, be made for all men; ...
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1answer
39 views

Is ”what there is a reason to do” a valid construct?

From page 76 of Frederick Schauer’s Thinking Like a Lawyer: What there is a reason to do is different from what should be done, all things considered, just as what there is a right to do is ...
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1answer
94 views

Send versus sends; and has versus have [duplicate]

I did a simple online English test and got two incorrect answers. Could someone please either explain the reason behind these two grammatical mistakes, or direct me in the direction of the grammar ...
3
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1answer
83 views

“X is not dead, it just smells so” [closed]

From what I've found the typical form of this phrase is X is not dead, it just smells that way. Can "that way" be replaced with a so in such a position? X is not dead, it just smells so.
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386 views

Is it grammatical to split either/or into different sentences?

I came across the following sentence in Wikipedia: The bitangent lines can be constructed either by constructing the homothetic centers, as described at that article, and then constructing the ...
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3answers
55 views

Is “for short” correct?

In conversation I used the phrase "for short" in the context: "I will call you blank for short." I know I've heard the phrase before, but I'm wondering if it is actually acceptable English? If ...
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2answers
101 views

Grammatical Voice Problem [closed]

"Can security be granted by an entity which is neither a borrower nor a guarantor? Yes, The third party may be granted if . . ..“ I don't understand what this sentence means. Who grants whom? To my ...
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3answers
79 views

Is “Are” always used with plural verbs/nouns? [duplicate]

Examples: There's six seasons, dude. Wouldn't it be: There're six seasons, dude. We are talking about multiple items; six seasons. If we refer to multiple items, we should use "Are" in ...
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75 views

Complex question starting with 'I wonder'

I want to ask about some plans, which I want to define in the question. And I want to start with I wonder. So something like: I wonder what the plans for the next steps regarding the topic we ...
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1answer
28 views

Comparison between two elements [duplicate]

When comparing two elements, should we use "more" or "most"? Example: "There are two locations, you can choose the more/the most convenient one."
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38 views

“This facility has/have a new administrator” [closed]

"This facility has a new administrator" — is this correct? Or should it be "this facility have a new administrator"?
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78 views

Am I using “suggest that” correctly?

I am writing to my manager. I want to suggest making a new service to her. I have problem with this sentence: Can you suggest to them that [Company Name] develops the Italian version of the ...
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1answer
67 views

Why is “in the catching of” wrong?

In this sentence, in the catching of is grammatically incorrect, but I cannot tell how: The new system, which uses remote cameras in the catching of speeding motorists, may undermine the police ...
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1answer
71 views

Use of “exist” in “Can there exist an uncountable planar graph?”

Can there exist an uncountable planar graph? This usage of exist bothers me. In this context, my understanding is that it is used as a replacement for be. That looks very strange to me. However, ...
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1answer
187 views

“Mistaken as” vs. “mistaken for”

I heard someone use the words mistaken as rather than mistaken for. Is this correct? If it is correct then what is the difference between the two? Is it ever wrong to use mistaken as, and if so, why? ...
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1answer
70 views

“Blue colour” or “Colour blue”

Recently I started learning english on busuu.com. In on of the elementary exercices "Colours", that I performed, the following phrase was stated as the correct answer: "I like the colour blue" ...
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Why do we say “write in” a journal instead of “write” journal?

I noticed that we always say "write in a journal" instead of simply "write a journal." Why is this?
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42 views

What would you say? [closed]

Is the following sentence grammatically correct? 'I smelled that our dinner was burning.' I don't think I've heard that 'smell' as a verb is followed by that-clause. What do you think?
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2answers
153 views

Do the -ing and to-infinitive “verbs” that follow catenative verbs always take the grammatical function of “noun”?

I'm wondering whether or not the verb form that follows a catenative verb has the grammatical function of a noun or of a verb, and whether or not it depends on the first catenative verb. "I like to ...
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3answers
122 views

Is “A Midsummer’s Night’s Dream” correct English?

Shakespeare’s play is called A Midsummer Night’s Dream. So is A Midsummer’s Night’s Dream correct English? If not, what would be the correct English?
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61 views

Does “clandestine ignorance” make sense? [closed]

Does the following make sense, "clandestine ignorance"? I would like to see if anyone else is thinking the same way as to the meaning or definition as I do. Thanks.
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84 views

Can we use both British English and American English in the same article?

Can we use British English trends and American English trends (such as spelling, or turns of phrase) in different sentences in the one topic?
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43 views

Use of the word “panic-stricken” for self

which would be the correct use of the word "panic-stricken" in the two sentences below: I was panic-stricken at the thought of missing my trip to usa OR I got panic-stricken at the thought ...
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1answer
50 views

Can one use 'prepare' instead of 'be prepared' or 'be ready'?

a) - The document you requested will take four days to be ready. b) - The document you requested will take four days to prepare. Does (b) give the same meaning as (a)? Is this a correct way to use ...
2
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1answer
68 views

Is it grammatical to say of some potential meaning that it is “able to be said” or “trying to be said”?

A recent commenter on a recent word-search question nominated a term as “an even better word for what is trying to be said.” This seems to me to attribute intention to something—a ...
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2answers
54 views

Is this sentence correct grammatically? [closed]

Do you have any knowledge at photography? Is this sentence correct? I don't think so, the at doesn't sound right, but my friend says some grammar checker tells that its correct?
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2answers
61 views

Claim a stake or stake a claim?

Which of the following is a correct usage? CLAIM A STAKE or STAKE A CLAIM I am highly confused about these two. How to use them in sentences? Though the first one appears to be correct to ...
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1answer
22 views

Is “Write something also on. . . .” ok?

In the following sentence, is the usage of also considered grammatically correct, or is there something wrong with it? Write something also on an alternative approach to this problem; explain ...
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1answer
79 views

Is “likes nothing less” or “likes nothing more” correct?

He likes nothing less than an extremely sophisticated life. He likes nothing more than an extremely sophisticated life. Both look meaningfully similar. In the first one, 'less' appears to ...
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0answers
20 views

What is the gramatically correct form? [duplicate]

What is the gramatically correct form: "my mom and dad's house" or "my mom's and dad's house"?
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41 views

“Charge it by the blink” vs. “charge it in blinks”

Which of these sentences is grammatically and semantically more appropriate? Lawyers measure time and charge it by the blink. Lawyers measure time and charge it in blinks.
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23 views

“Page Not Found” - is it grammatically correct? [duplicate]

404 - Page Not Found Every time I see this error message, I think: is it grammatically correct? Because I have the feeling that the verb is missing.