Grammaticality refers to whether something obeys the rules of grammar for English.

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Why can't “had better” take a that-clause?

Given that we say things such as "I'd rather (that) you do it.", I'd expect "I had better (that) you do it." to be possible as well to mean "I would consider/find/have it better that you do it.", ...
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2answers
67 views

Should the verb phrases following “either” and “or” in an “either/or” sentence have the same structure?

Should the verb phrases following either and or in an "either or" sentence have the same structure? For example, is the following sentence correct? The coordinates of the points are either ...
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31 views

difference between “confer” upon & “confers” upon

In an example like: Aristotle University upon recommendation from College of Nursing and by authority of the Board of Governors of Aristotle University hereby "confer" upon Mr. John Williams the ...
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4answers
235 views

“Sally broke her leg” vs. “Sally has broken her leg”? How does switching the past simple with the present perfect affect meaning?

Earlier today I had a private lesson with an Italian student—intermediate level, who has been studying the present perfect vs. past simple tense. His teacher had given him an exercise where a list of ...
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4answers
208 views

Omitting “there” in a sentence

Can I omit there in the following question: How much juice is there in the bottle? When is it possible to omit there in a sentence? Any references to grammar sources are welcome and expected. ...
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1answer
87 views

“Whom” or “who” for object of a subordinate clause inside a relative clause [duplicate]

They interviewed several candidates who he thought had the experience and qualifications he required. My test prep book says this should be "who" because of the subordinate clause's predicate: ...
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1answer
68 views

What is the origin of using '-wise' as a suffix? [duplicate]

What is the origin of using '-wise' as a suffix in expressions such as the following. Is it grammatically correct? Is it strongly idiomatic, or sloppy language? 'What is he doing job-wise these ...
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1answer
54 views

Whats the past of present unreal conditonal?

What is the past of present unreal conditional ? I wish I were king ( how to make it past, is it - I wished I had been king ) What's the difference between the following two - "I wish it stopped ...
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2answers
77 views

Is it possible to say so very and very so?

I know that it is correct to use: Thank you so very much. As much as I know an adverb can be theoretically used to modify another adverb, so my question is: Is it possible to say very so ...
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0answers
15 views

Grammar used in have been and had been in sentence [duplicate]

When we are going to use have been and had been ? Especially in Past tense and Past participle ?
2
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1answer
80 views

Why “hundreds of <noun>s” instead of “hundreds of <noun>”?

In the expression hundreds of <noun>(s), I would think that hundreds is what's being modified because of is usually right-branching: hundreds<-{of <noun>(s)} (This is in contrast ...
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2answers
55 views

Is the usage of “in” in the following sentence correct? [closed]

Is the usage of in in the following sentence correct? She sacrificed her own life in to teach my father a lesson and hoped to keep us alive. I am reading a book that one of my friends wrote; ...
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865 views

Why is “herself” required in this particular sentence?

Why is a reflexive pronoun, i.e. herself, grammatically required in the following sentence? I gave Susie a picture of herself. Compare with: I gave Susie a picture of her. This ...
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1answer
143 views

What’s so funny about “You are winner”? [closed]

I came across one slang thing: http://www.urbandictionary.com/define.php?term=You%27re%20Winner! While understand that it is grammatically incorrect and you must say "You are the winner", I don't get ...
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2answers
50 views

How to best correct ambiguity of “in the room next to me”?

A common construction in English is: There is a person in the room next to me. However, this is ambiguous because it’s unclear whether the person is in a separate room that happens to be ...
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1answer
36 views

“Write an update to people”?

In the context of the proper use of a ticket-tracking system for software development, someone said: Do not write project status updates to a limited subset of people in email. (Instead, send ...
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3answers
71 views

How to indicate “now” in storytelling?

The following sentences - I was humiliated by him, and now he was standing next to me. and And now, I was looking at him, preparing for his entrance. Are these grammatically correct? I ...
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1answer
51 views

“Not only . . . but (also)” correlative conjunction question

The amount of jobs that have been transferred out of state in the past five years is staggering; not only manufacturing jobs but white-collar ones have moved as well. Is this appropriate usage of ...
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1answer
116 views

When to use “myself” or “me” [duplicate]

Which is grammatically correct? "Request you to register me for the course" "Request you to register myself for the course"
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1answer
45 views

Would you guys change the following sentence suitable for my cover letter? [closed]

I need your help guys:) I am applying for an instructor position at a university in the States. Would you please change the following statement appropriate for my cover letter? "My bachelor's degree ...
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1answer
40 views

“Myself” as a single subject

How do we use myself as the only subject of a sentence? For example I once heard some people saying Myself am to be blamed. Is this grammatically correct? How is it different from I am to be blamed? ...
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2answers
167 views

“I went to the hotel you were staying at” vs. “you stayed at”

Is there a difference in meaning between these two sentences? I went to the hotel you were staying at when you were in New York. I went to the hotel you stayed  at when you were in New York. ...
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1answer
112 views

Singular or plural form of verb [closed]

Which of two following sentences is correct? Depending on whether a birth or a death occurs , we have... Depending on whether a birth or a death occur, we have... Update I changed the title.
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53 views

Possessive apostrophe for owner of owner of owner of

I've read Preferred way to apostrophise in case of dual or multiple ownership by distinct entities and "Nikki's and Alice's X" vs. "Nikki and Alice's X", but my ...
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1answer
60 views

Is the participle clause in “the marlin left a blood trail attracting sharks” correct? [closed]

I'm writing a summary of the novel "The old man and the sea". And I'm trying to use participle clauses (a subject that I'm currently learning). I've learnt that you can use a participle clause to ...
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1answer
60 views

Asking a “Do you have…” question without do-support

Is the following sentence correct English? Have you the address? The address in question is obvious to the person being asked. It's normal to ask such a question as "Do you have the address?" ...
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61 views

Is the phrase “Best of luck ahead! ” grammatically correct?

"Best of luck for your future ahead!" - can this phrase be shortened to "Best of luck ahead!".
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352 views

Is “He don't mean it” correct? [duplicate]

When I was reading the book Because of Winn-Dixie, on page 89 I found a paragraph as follows: "Oh, lay off her," Dunlap said to Stevie. Then he turned to me. "He don't mean it," he said. Can ...
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3answers
235 views

'I thought', 'I would think', 'I would have thought'

I'm going to show you three examples. 1. A - Have you got any change?     B - Do I have change? What for?     A - For the vending machine! ...
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3answers
44 views

Should I use activity or activities

I want to say something like "the antibacterial activity of these three drugs is the same". I am not sure whether i should use activity or activities in the above sentence, since three drugs are ...
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2answers
43 views

Is it correct to use “for” with “required”?

I am editing a sentence that is of the form: A has required for B to effect a change. To my ear, this sounds better: A has required that B effect a change. Am I wrong in my dislike of "has ...
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4answers
93 views

What's the difference between “although” and “even-if”

What is the difference between the following sentences: You may be prevented from crossing the border, although you are in possession of a valid visa. You may be prevented from crossing the border, ...
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4answers
111 views

Is there an implied verb missing?

Is this statement correct? - However catastrophic the physical abuse, the lasting scars came from the verbal insults that had been hurled at them. Does the first part of the sentence before the ...
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0answers
129 views

Subject/Complement Agreement. How to describe problem with “The thing is the objects.”

In my ell answer, version 32, I provided the following, problematic, wording (especially bold italic), and I need help to better understand this issue so I can fix my answer:1 The thing is ...
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7answers
3k views

Can a person happen? Is “Zodanga happened” correct?

I was watching movie John Carter where there was some dialogue like this: — What happened here? — Zodanga happened. Here Zodanga was a bad guy in the movie. I don't understand how a guy ...
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1answer
73 views

Who is one God and the one Mediator? [closed]

This is a passage from a book of the Bible: 1 Timothy Chapter 2 1 Exhort therefore, that, first of all, supplications, prayers, intercessions, and giving of thanks, be made for all men; ...
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1answer
40 views

Is ”what there is a reason to do” a valid construct?

From page 76 of Frederick Schauer’s Thinking Like a Lawyer: What there is a reason to do is different from what should be done, all things considered, just as what there is a right to do is ...
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1answer
106 views

Send versus sends; and has versus have [duplicate]

I did a simple online English test and got two incorrect answers. Could someone please either explain the reason behind these two grammatical mistakes, or direct me in the direction of the grammar ...
3
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1answer
84 views

“X is not dead, it just smells so” [closed]

From what I've found the typical form of this phrase is X is not dead, it just smells that way. Can "that way" be replaced with a so in such a position? X is not dead, it just smells so.
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4answers
396 views

Is it grammatical to split either/or into different sentences?

I came across the following sentence in Wikipedia: The bitangent lines can be constructed either by constructing the homothetic centers, as described at that article, and then constructing the ...
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3answers
56 views

Is “for short” correct?

In conversation I used the phrase "for short" in the context: "I will call you blank for short." I know I've heard the phrase before, but I'm wondering if it is actually acceptable English? If ...
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2answers
104 views

Grammatical Voice Problem [closed]

"Can security be granted by an entity which is neither a borrower nor a guarantor? Yes, The third party may be granted if . . ..“ I don't understand what this sentence means. Who grants whom? To my ...
1
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3answers
90 views

Is “Are” always used with plural verbs/nouns? [duplicate]

Examples: There's six seasons, dude. Wouldn't it be: There're six seasons, dude. We are talking about multiple items; six seasons. If we refer to multiple items, we should use "Are" in ...
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2answers
81 views

Complex question starting with 'I wonder'

I want to ask about some plans, which I want to define in the question. And I want to start with I wonder. So something like: I wonder what the plans for the next steps regarding the topic we ...
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1answer
29 views

Comparison between two elements [duplicate]

When comparing two elements, should we use "more" or "most"? Example: "There are two locations, you can choose the more/the most convenient one."
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1answer
39 views

“This facility has/have a new administrator” [closed]

"This facility has a new administrator" — is this correct? Or should it be "this facility have a new administrator"?
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2answers
82 views

Am I using “suggest that” correctly?

I am writing to my manager. I want to suggest making a new service to her. I have problem with this sentence: Can you suggest to them that [Company Name] develops the Italian version of the ...
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1answer
77 views

Why is “in the catching of” wrong?

In this sentence, in the catching of is grammatically incorrect, but I cannot tell how: The new system, which uses remote cameras in the catching of speeding motorists, may undermine the police ...
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1answer
73 views

Use of “exist” in “Can there exist an uncountable planar graph?”

Can there exist an uncountable planar graph? This usage of exist bothers me. In this context, my understanding is that it is used as a replacement for be. That looks very strange to me. However, ...
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1answer
218 views

“Mistaken as” vs. “mistaken for”

I heard someone use the words mistaken as rather than mistaken for. Is this correct? If it is correct then what is the difference between the two? Is it ever wrong to use mistaken as, and if so, why? ...