Grammaticality refers to whether something obeys the rules of grammar for English.

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4answers
939 views

Usage of “might” and “would” to indicate doubt

Do the sentences She might be only 28, but Jodie Whittaker.... and My parents would have walked along the Barrow wrongly suggest doubt, or are they normal usage? Are there names for ...
2
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1answer
82 views

“Is himself in?” What does it mean?

Context - A stranger knocks on your door and asks "Is himself in?" himself, a reflexive pronoun, here seems to be used for a nominative pronoun.
1
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2answers
530 views

Statements beginning with subject+wonder

I'm wondering about the sentence structure when you use wonder. Take for instance: I wonder when will my money be refunded. I wonder when my money will be refunded. I wonder when is my ...
3
votes
4answers
929 views

Tenses for two clauses joined by “if only”

Our school had won the match if only we have concentrated. Our school would have won the match if only we would have concentrated. Our school would win the match if only we had concentrated. ...
2
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4answers
1k views

When someone says, “I do not feel that good”, what does that mean?

I have heard it many times in movies and shows. I think it means "I do not feel very good" or "I do not feel as good as you think", but why do we use "that" here, and is it correct?
27
votes
3answers
3k views

“How does it look?”

Formally, in my English education, I have learned to ask for the outward appearance of something using the expression: "What does it look like?" Since my mother tongue is German and we say "Wie ...
0
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2answers
53 views

“Made look better” vs. “made to look better”

Results are made to look better by... Results are made look better by... Are both correct? Is there another way of phrasing this sentence?
6
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2answers
13k views

Is it correct to say “I feel painful” to mean “I feel pain”?

Is it correct to say "I feel painful" to mean "I feel pain"? Please note that I mean only those cases, in which the phrase is a complete sentence. There should be no words after the last word in each ...
-1
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2answers
1k views

“Feel committed to [gerund/infinitive]”

Does "feel committed to" require an infinitive or gerund complement? For example, which of the following is grammatical? I feel committed to following up on that. I feel committed to follow ...
5
votes
7answers
8k views

Is “architect” a verb and a noun?

I hear the word architect used as a verb in the technical field and now more often in other industries and groups, for example: We need to architect a better solution to the problem. I am ...
0
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2answers
39 views

Definite article or no definite article before “Americans” in this sentence from “The Adventure of English”

The Adventure of English, page 286, reads "The Americans are more polite about the English than the English are about Americans" I wouldn't use the definite article before "Americans" in this ...
14
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4answers
2k views

What is it called when words are deliberately written wrong but pronunciation is kept unchanged?

For example, Night -> Nite Nite even appears in some dictionaries as having the same meaning as night. What is it called when words are deliberately written incorrectly but the pronunciation ...
0
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1answer
57 views

Something happens because clause A, and clause B.

I wonder whether because can introduce two or even more reasons; if yes, how they are connected. For example, John came late because he woke up late, and his bicycle was broken. Is the sentence ...
5
votes
2answers
11k views

“Studying PhD at the university” or “studying PhD in the university”?

Which of these two sentences is correct: I am studying PhD at the university. I am studying PhD in the university. Should I use "at" or "in"? Or is there no difference?
3
votes
3answers
427 views

Is this social media post really grammatically correct as it claims?

A friend of mine shared an image macro that contained this block of text, claiming it is grammatically correct. This exceeding trifling witling, considering ranting criticizing concerning adopting ...
0
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1answer
27 views

Phrase question

Are the words "board lease" or "residential lease" capitalized in a sentence? I am a secretary for a school board (is that capitalized?? ha) and these phrases are very frequent. Thank you.
1
vote
3answers
38 views

Adaptable at or in or to doing something

I am confused with what is the correct expression to use, is it better saying "I am adaptable at using smth", "I am adaptable on using smth" or "I am adaptable to using smth"? The third sounds ...
0
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2answers
41 views

Is the plural form of ID spelled ID's or ID? [duplicate]

How to write or tell that collection of Email ID's has been attached.
0
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2answers
70 views

“Write an update to people”?

In the context of the proper use of a ticket-tracking system for software development, someone said: Do not write project status updates to a limited subset of people in email. (Instead, send ...
-2
votes
1answer
44 views

“A unary” or “an unary?” [duplicate]

What's the rule for the "a/an" choice when a word begins with a vowel but sounds like a consonant (e.g. "unary") and vice versa?
2
votes
2answers
145 views

Should the verb phrases following “either” and “or” in an “either/or” sentence have the same structure?

Should the verb phrases following either and or in an "either or" sentence have the same structure? For example, is the following sentence correct? The coordinates of the points are either ...
0
votes
1answer
153 views

Can 'must' be used in a negative question?

Is it proper to write negative questions this way? You mustn't watch too much TV, must you?
1
vote
1answer
40 views

Using relative pronoun “who” with “team” or “bunch”

I would like to know if this sentence is grammatical, with its usage of the relative pronoun who. (I) Our team is a happy bunch who works night and day. I am getting two parses for this sentence: ...
1
vote
1answer
59 views

Is the omission of the verb “To be” in informative sentence [duplicate]

I have the following sentence: File (is) larger than allowed. Is the verb "to be" required here? Is it correct English to use "File larger than allowed."?
1
vote
1answer
78 views

Why areN'T 'not least' and 'notably' interchangeable?

The example is taken from page 1 of this PDF ; The National Admissions Test for Law (LNAT): You may find, however, that answering one question helps you answer the next, not least for the purposes ...
6
votes
5answers
1k views

Why is “herself” required in this particular sentence?

Why is a reflexive pronoun, i.e. herself, grammatically required in the following sentence? I gave Susie a picture of herself. Compare with: I gave Susie a picture of her. This ...
0
votes
1answer
69 views

“More so” or moreso?

I often find myself using the two words joined together, moreso. I'm not sure where I picked up this usage. I'm also not sure that it's necessarily the correct one, as some proofreading tools will ...
1
vote
2answers
37 views

can we omit the article the in front of 2 musical instruments?

My sentence is : He plays the piano & the violin. Or is it correct to say, he plays the piano & violin?
0
votes
1answer
59 views

“with” vs “to have”

I have a tendency to say things like: It was nice with cake. Usually it's in the form of: It was adjective with noun. whereas my wife is always correcting me to: It was nice to have ...
0
votes
2answers
439 views

Had been vs was

Now this is confusing.. I wanna know the difference between the following sentences: -If you were there, I would see you. -If you had been there, I would have seen you. What's the difference ...
9
votes
9answers
15k views

Is “a wide range of features” singular or plural?

In the office, we've been having a discussion about the grammar in a sentence and have differing opinions about what is right and what is wrong... It is a very minor issue but is still bugging me :) ...
2
votes
5answers
1k views

“You're missing the posts only available to members” — should there be a “the” in there?

Consider this sentence: You're missing posts only available to members. I think it should actually be You're missing the posts available only to members or at least You're missing ...
0
votes
2answers
1k views

“With use of” vs. “with the use of”

Do you solve engineering problems with use of programming methods, or do you solve engineering problems with the use of programming methods? Which one is correct? Are both wrong? If so, what is a ...
1
vote
3answers
145 views

“Either your dog or your cat eats” vs. “Either your dog or cat eats”

Version (1) seems correct to me, but I cannot explain why it is correct grammatically. Could someone explain please? Either your dog or your cat eats my garbage. Either your dog or cat eats ...
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2answers
33 views

I haven't offered you at least a drink [closed]

I haven't offered you at least a drink. Have I used at least correctly here? Are there rules to how an expression like at least is used?
0
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1answer
81 views

Can “a-mingle” be a verb in imperative mood?

In the last lines of "Jingle Bells Rock": Jingle bell time is a swell time To go gliding in a one-horse sleigh Giddy-up jingle horse, pick up your feet Jingle around the clock ...
1
vote
2answers
81 views

“The more, the merrier!” — Is this a sentence? If not… what?

Is The more, the merrier! a sentence? It doesn't seem to have a main verb, so I'm inclined to say no, but it certainly functions as a sentence in everyday speech. I can think of three ways of ...
0
votes
1answer
39 views

“So shouldn't you”?

So shouldn't you: is this grammatically correct? Or is you shouldn't either the only appropriate response?
1
vote
3answers
72 views

Need help identifying subject in sentence with a conjunction

Currently, I am involved in a disagreement as to interpreting the grammatical meaning of the following sentence: “Restores 10% of Att as HP in battle.” Given that “Att” and “HP” are nouns (with ...
0
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2answers
70 views

preposition “travel in” or “travel by” [duplicate]

Which is the grammatically correct statement : "We are travelling in a car" Or "We are travelling by a car" Thanks in advance...
4
votes
3answers
734 views

Is “reblog” a word?

I have heard from many friends that grammatically "reblog" is not a word. It's something similar to "retweet" from Twitter terminology but Tumblr use it quite frequently. Any ideas?
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votes
3answers
380 views

Is it OK to write “Good to see you” in an email or Facebook message?

An old friend of mine wrote some greetings to me on facebook. Now if I want to answer his greetings, is it OK to write the following? "Hi, John, good to see you again" Because I don't "see" him ...
5
votes
5answers
519 views

To add someone “to” Facebook or “on” Facebook

Which one is correct and why: It was the first time a girl asked me to add her on Facebook Or It was the first time a girl asked me to add her to Facebook
3
votes
2answers
2k views

“The likeliest problem” vs. “the most likely problem”

The likeliest problem vs. the most likely problem: are they both correct? do they mean the same thing? is one preferable over another?
1
vote
1answer
91 views

“In my career as” — is “as” correct here?

I have this fragment: ... the experience and knowledge gained will be helpful in my career as a neuropathologist. Is the "as" here okay? It somehow does not sound right to me. Obviously I want ...
2
votes
4answers
3k views

Can someone please tell me which of the two sentences is correct?

Here are the two sentences. This was the fastest I heard someone responded. This was the fastest I heard someone respond. Can someone help me understand: A) Which one is correct, and what is ...
21
votes
10answers
3k views

What rules make “Remember me, who am your friend” grammatical?

An acquaintance recalled this specific example from an English textbook, but it is jarring to my native ear. Is this an example of prescriptive grammarians gone wild?
0
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1answer
39 views

Can we say “the must info” in the sense of valuable information? [closed]

I heard the phrase once but don't know the context of conversation. Additionally, is "the must info" grammatically correct?
0
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0answers
32 views

apart from + verb with gerund or not

I was reading the Rails Tutorial and I came across this: The div tag is a generic division; it doesn’t do anything apart from divide the document into distinct parts. I would say apart from ...
2
votes
1answer
77 views

If the rule states an infinitive follows the verb “want”, why is “I don't want you worrying” correct?

Why is the sentence "I don't want you worrying about the oral interview" correct? Is the syntax want+gerund correct? Shouldn't it be I don't want you to worry about the oral interview (?) ...