2
votes
0answers
45 views

Is “I watched them go” grammatically correct? [migrated]

It has been only few years I have been watching English movies. Recently I heard a sentence saying "I watched them go". I have been repeating the scene, and checked through subtitles whether I heard ...
1
vote
3answers
79 views

Is the “sorry to [infinitive] ” structure always grammatical?

I'm sorry to be so late. I'm sorry to hear about your sick mother. I'm sorry to waste your time. I'm sorry to make you feel so sad. I'm sorry to frighten you. I'm sorry to disagree ...
0
votes
3answers
102 views

Which is correct: “is solved” or “has been solved”?

In a technical environment, what is the most suitable sentence to use when answering to someone about a problem that they had and we solved it for them: The problem is solved The problem has been ...
-1
votes
0answers
178 views

One of the underlined words is wrong. Choose either A, B, C or D [duplicate]

"What (are:A) you talking (about:B)? (I'm:C) not (understand:D) you." At first, I thought C, so the sentence would be "What are you talking about? I don't understand you." And I chose C because I ...
1
vote
3answers
134 views

“Went and got” — is it grammatically correct?

Trying to find out if phrases like "went and got" are correct, e.g.: She went and got the book.
0
votes
6answers
350 views

“I don't understand you” vs. “I'm not understanding you” [closed]

Which sentence is correct? What are you talking about? I don't understand you. What are you talking about? I'm not understanding you. That was a question we've had in an exam and it was: ...
0
votes
1answer
85 views

How to combine in a sentence two verb–preposition pairs that have the same TWO objects?

How could one combine succinctly two verbs with the same two objects with different prepositions? For example, if I can either add gifts to a box and remove gifts from the box, what would be the most ...
3
votes
3answers
136 views

Past tense of “to cast” in the programming sense

In programming, to cast (also: to typecast) means to convert an object from one type to another (see Wikipedia). I'd like to know the correct past tense of to cast in this sense. Is it cast or ...
2
votes
1answer
131 views

Is “acknowledge(accept status) sb + to + infinitive” valid?

When to acknowledge is used in the sense of to admit the gerund is used. I acknowledge having made a mistake. However, I was wondering what is the appropriate form in the sense of to accept ...
1
vote
4answers
149 views

Preposition for “to be qualified”

Would you please tell me whether the following fragment is grammatically correct? ...led me to be qualified in various science Olympiads. For instance, I ranked 21st among... I know that ...
0
votes
2answers
79 views

“To mentor someone during a project” vs. “to mentor someone on a project”

..., whom I mentored during his final semester's project. ..., whom I mentored on his final semester's project. Which of these two is grammatically correct? Since I am not talking about ...
3
votes
1answer
60 views

Verbs while using if

If you want to talk about a possibility or something you would like to be different you can say "If I were taller", "If you were faster". You use the verb in past tense. Is it correct? But what about ...
1
vote
1answer
426 views

“Enquire about whether” vs. “enquire whether”

I'm writing to you to enquire whether you have a need for I'm writing to you to enquire about whether you have a need for Which is proper?
-3
votes
1answer
274 views

Checking the grammar of the following sentence [duplicate]

I need to check the grammaticality of the following sentence: If I __ a doctor, I would serve the poor. (a) am (b) had been (c) were (d) was I am confused with were and had been since there is ...
0
votes
1answer
182 views

“Haven't known” and “haven't knew”

Google search gives about 19,500,000 results for "haven't known" and about 12,500,000 results for "haven't knew". So I am a bit confused about this. Could anyone please explain how should I say and ...
6
votes
4answers
455 views

Usage of “to find (noun) (adj)”

I am a native speaker of German, and I often see the English verb find being used like its German cognate finden. For example: My students and I find your platform very useful and very appealing ...
-1
votes
1answer
422 views

if it wasn't for or if it weren't for? [duplicate]

I don't know what should to write with I would think you were bluffing if it, should it be wasn't or weren't for?
1
vote
2answers
1k views

“There are still problems” vs. “there still are problems”

There are still problems. There still are problems. Is one word order more correct than the other and do they have identical meaning?
1
vote
2answers
93 views

'Ask' and its objects

I'd like to know if the objects of the verb 'ask' must follow an order. If so what is that order? Should the first object be the person (someone) or the thing (something)? For example: Will you ask ...
1
vote
4answers
313 views

Using the prepositions “on”/“off” as transitive verbs

Is it correct to say 'on it' or 'off it', where 'it' may refer to something like a light switch?
1
vote
1answer
98 views

“Come of a royal family” vs. “comes from a royal family”

Is it correct to say "She comes of a royal family"? Or should it be "She comes from a royal family"? Both sound correct to me. Could someone explain?
0
votes
0answers
25 views

“Allow to [infinitive]” vs. “allow [gerund]” [duplicate]

Which of the following is grammatical? If both are, which is preferred when and why? Has developed a new label that allows to mark... Has developed a new label that allows marking...
2
votes
2answers
2k views

“Suggest to go” vs. “suggest going”

I took an English assessment test online and this was my answer: Someone suggested to go for a walk. My answer was wrong and this was the correct sentence: Someone suggested going for a ...
0
votes
3answers
236 views

Correct place to use the word “Fathomed”

I have used "Fathomed" in the following sentence "Fathomed the issue. And solved the issue" to mean "I understood the problem and I solved it" Is this the right way to use fathomed?
0
votes
1answer
259 views

What are the differences between the following responses to the question “how are you?” [duplicate]

I am good. I am well. I feel good. I feel well. I am feeling well. I am feeling good. I am doing good. I am doing well. A former English teacher told me #1 is improper English and to use #2. Is ...
-1
votes
1answer
81 views

“buying cookies will deliver on our promise” - can I use subject and verb like this?

A bit of context: a couple decided not to spend money on unecessary stuff and they promised that to each other. Later, one of them says: I dont believe that buying cookies will deliver on our ...
0
votes
0answers
29 views

usage of believe in 3rd person [duplicate]

I was watching a video about a car company. The narrator was talking about the company Tesla and said: Tesla believe it can lead the revolution and change the face of motoring forever. The ...
0
votes
2answers
121 views

“Date and venue is” vs. “date and venue are”

Which of the following is the correct way? Date and venue is the top priority. Date and venue are the top priority.
2
votes
1answer
700 views

“To see” vs “seeing” [duplicate]

Which of the following is grammatical? To see my stuff at your grocery is a great source of pride! Seeing my stuff at your grocery is a great source of pride! The verb "to see" is ...
1
vote
1answer
192 views

“Committed to build” vs. “committed to building”

If this were a mere tagline, not a complete sentence in a full paragraph, which would be more correct? Committed to build a better world Committed to building a better world
1
vote
0answers
46 views

Asking a Question in the Imperfect [duplicate]

I can say in Spanish, Yo jugaba al tenis cuando tenía 8 años, which means I used to play tennis when I was 8 years old. I could also ask, ¿Jugabas tú al tenis cuando tenías 8 años? ...
2
votes
2answers
104 views

“Contest against an argument” or “contest an argument”?

I have a student that repeatedly writes of “contesting against former arguments”. Is this correct? I know it is normally “contest an argument”, but I’m not sure if the other use is valid also.
3
votes
2answers
2k views

“Would you mind if I use” vs. “would you mind if I used” [duplicate]

Would you mind if I use/used your mobile? One of my friends said used is wrong here. But I think it's grammatical. Who is right?
3
votes
4answers
293 views

Can the word “facing” be used both ways?

Can the word "facing" be used both ways? To write major water problems facing the world or challenges and opportunities facing low- and middle-income countries and their citizens ...
-1
votes
1answer
96 views

“Flatly denied that he had copied” vs. “flatly denied the charges that he had copied”

The student flatly denied that he had copied in the examination hall. The above sentence is not correct, I found that it must be "flatly denied the charges that". Am I thinking in the right ...
1
vote
1answer
2k views

“Which Allow me” or “Which Allows me”?

Context: "My work requires me to be at different areas for different events which allow me to learn ..." Do I use "allows" or "allow"? Can you provide me the rules/situations in choosing which one to ...
2
votes
1answer
171 views

Usage of “accrue” in “it accrued to me to gently ask” [closed]

A newage hippie Facebook friend just sent me this. I was just wondering if it was syntactically correct, It accrued to me to gently ask if you could consider extending the same respect, you would ...
-1
votes
1answer
419 views

Correct use of “happen”

A friend of mine told me that the following sentence is incorrect (copied from an exercise) Do all sentences tell us what the speaker would like to happen? He claims that it should read: Do ...
0
votes
2answers
163 views

“I would like to go to a youth center to help and (to) work with teenagers”

Which is correct? I would like to go to a youth center to help and work with teenagers. I would like to go to a youth center to help and to work with teenagers. The question is whether ...
2
votes
2answers
268 views

For + verb-ing at the beginning of a sentece

Is the following sentence structure grammatically correct? I mean, I've found a lot of examples that have this structure but not at the beginning of the phrase but with a subject before. Here is an ...
0
votes
1answer
74 views

Can one massacre lives?

"Most were convinced that those responsible were of their own, silently waiting for another chance to massacre innocent lives." Would you say that the above example is acceptable or unacceptable with ...
0
votes
2answers
481 views

Using 'will' vs. 'would' in this sentence

I'd like to know which one of the following is correct: I would like to have a job which I will like and which will earn me a lot of money. I would like to have a job which I would like and ...
-1
votes
1answer
402 views

“more people becoming increasingly xxx” or “more people increasingly becoming xxx”

I need a bit of guidance regarding the following sentence. Which of the three variants is grammatical? Are more people becoming increasingly intolerant? Are more people increasingly becoming ...
-2
votes
2answers
209 views

Is a bare infinitive acceptable as the object of a verb? [duplicate]

I came upon the phrase, "writing helps develop a child analytically thinking." Is this grammatically correct? Is it OK to use just develop instead of to develop?
-2
votes
1answer
258 views

The right usage of the verb “elaborate”

I'm writing a paper, please can you tell me which sentence is the right? The Pseudo-code is outlined in Fig 2 and we elaborate it in the following section. The Pseudo-code is outlined in Fig ...
-3
votes
1answer
438 views

Usage of “I am afraid” [closed]

What kind of sentence should follow the phrase "I am afraid", assertive or interogative? For example, is the following sentence grammatical? I am afraid is it appropriate ask me a copy of it.
-1
votes
1answer
56 views

Grammaticality of “help someone something” [closed]

A few times I've encountered phrases of the form "help yourself [something]", for example "help yourself some water". I consider this form to be ungrammatical, but I am not a native speaker. Is it ...
2
votes
1answer
295 views

Use of gerund without preposition “to”

Can I use gerunds with the word "concede" without using preposition "to" as in the sentence below? He concedes killing his wife.
0
votes
1answer
293 views

“Ride a bicycle” or “ride on bicycle”?

Which is correct, "ride on a bicycle" or "ride a bicycle"?
2
votes
1answer
261 views

I was sat thinking why you were stood there before I was took away by the word police [duplicate]

I know my sentence is dreadful but everyone now uses these words in this way, including my eight children aged 19—26. Yes, they are from Manchester but my husband uses he was took and he’s from ...