3
votes
1answer
102 views

“New York is a great place to live.” (no preposition?)

New York is a great place to live. New York is a great place to live in. I've seen the former usage a lot and I've started wondering what the grammar aspects of it are. The main question ...
0
votes
4answers
65 views

“In” + gerund: “Pip joins the procession in carrying the casket”

Pip joins the funeral procession, planned out by Mr. Trabb, the tailor, in carrying Mrs. Joe’s casket through town. Is this sentence grammatically correct? One of my teachers proofread my work, ...
0
votes
1answer
33 views

“In my career as” — is “as” correct here?

I have this fragment: ... the experience and knowledge gained will be helpful in my career as a neuropathologist. Is the "as" here okay? It somehow does not sound right to me. Obviously I want ...
0
votes
2answers
53 views

Is the usage of “in” in the following sentence correct? [closed]

Is the usage of in in the following sentence correct? She sacrificed her own life in to teach my father a lesson and hoped to keep us alive. I am reading a book that one of my friends wrote; ...
1
vote
1answer
187 views

“Mistaken as” vs. “mistaken for”

I heard someone use the words mistaken as rather than mistaken for. Is this correct? If it is correct then what is the difference between the two? Is it ever wrong to use mistaken as, and if so, why? ...
0
votes
2answers
53 views

Use of the word Refrained

'The experience of negative emotions in the flow of life can never be stopped, only refrained!' Is this sentence grammatically wrong since the preposition 'from' does not follow the word refrained?
0
votes
1answer
34 views

Is “and with” grammatical in this sentence?

We have registered nurses working on site with a nutritional background to provide weight loss advice to clients and with at least a 2 year working experience. Is the part in bold grammatical?
0
votes
3answers
419 views

“By when you want it completed” vs. “when you want it completed by”

Which of the following is grammatical? Can you please let me know by when you want it completed. Can you please let me know when you want it completed by. I am preferring the latter, but ...
-1
votes
1answer
275 views

using a preposition after verbs such as “enter” and “control”

consider the two sentence below: "Elizabeth Taylor entered the room" and "she entered into the room". here is another pair: "the rebels control the city" and "they control over the city". my ...
2
votes
2answers
251 views

“As of this morning” vs. “as at this morning”

As of this morning, he was not in support of the motion. As at this morning, he was not in support of the motion. Which is correct?
1
vote
3answers
162 views

Is the “sorry to [infinitive] ” structure always grammatical?

I'm sorry to be so late. I'm sorry to hear about your sick mother. I'm sorry to waste your time. I'm sorry to make you feel so sad. I'm sorry to frighten you. I'm sorry to disagree ...
0
votes
4answers
215 views

Is it right to say “before since”?

I wonder if "before since" is right in my sentence. If not, could you please help me improve it? This company provides products since 2010. Consequently, there is no record of this product before ...
1
vote
2answers
204 views

“My interest in becoming” vs. “my interest to become”

I was writing a letter of application for a university. I wanted to start my letter by writing: I am writing this letter to express my interest in becoming part... and then I got confused. I am ...
0
votes
1answer
231 views

“Fall from” vs. “fall off”

Which of the following sentences is correct? She fell from the bike. She fell off the bike.
2
votes
2answers
396 views

Which is more grammatically correct - “performance in” or “performance on”?

Which of the following is more grammatically correct? a. John's performance on the test shocked the teacher. (or) b. John's performance in the test shocked the teacher.
0
votes
1answer
110 views

Does an object have “specificity to” or “specificity for” another object?

Does an object possess specificity to or for another object? Every time I go to express this concept in writing, I struggle over which preposition is the more appropriate and more precise. This is ...
0
votes
3answers
839 views

Using three examples with “range from”

When using range from with two examples, it could be: I should note that our current users range from juniors to graduates. But when using three examples: I should note that our current ...
0
votes
1answer
137 views

How to combine in a sentence two verb–preposition pairs that have the same TWO objects?

How could one combine succinctly two verbs with the same two objects with different prepositions? For example, if I can either add gifts to a box and remove gifts from the box, what would be the most ...
0
votes
2answers
363 views

Is “Didn't you have a meeting to attend to?” grammatical? [closed]

Is the sentence "Didn't you have a meeting to attend to" grammatically correct?
0
votes
2answers
135 views

“Change in scope” versus “Change of scope” versus “Change to (the) scope”

Any changes in scope will be addressed during this meeting. or Any changes of scope will be addressed during this meeting. or Any changes to (the) scope will be addressed during this ...
-1
votes
1answer
73 views

One Step To Backward - Should I Use “To”? Or Avoid it? [closed]

One Step To Backward - Should I Use "To"? Or Avoid it? One Step To Backward. One Step Backward.
2
votes
2answers
116 views

Is “Where is your mother at?” grammatical? [duplicate]

When querying: Where is your mother at? Is that considered to be proper English language usage? Alternatively, you could just state more simply: Where is your mother? Is adding the ...
1
vote
1answer
75 views

Is it correct to say “source to” instead of “source of”?

Is it correct use to as preposition in the following sentence? Books are the best source to knowledge. I have mostly seen of as being used with source, for example "source of knowledge". But I ...
-1
votes
2answers
152 views

“Confined in the case”, “confined on the bus”

The preposition “to” is widely used in the phrase “be confined to”. My question is, can I use “in” or “on” in the following sentences? Someone is confined in the case. Someone is confined on ...
-1
votes
1answer
65 views

Repeat “on” in a list?

Consider the following sentences. My question is: which one is grammatically correct? (If neither is, what is the correct formulation?) [the name of a chapter], in which he summarizes his past ...
1
vote
4answers
303 views

Preposition for “to be qualified”

Would you please tell me whether the following fragment is grammatically correct? ...led me to be qualified in various science Olympiads. For instance, I ranked 21st among... I know that ...
-2
votes
2answers
176 views

Position of “to” in a sentence

Which of the following is grammatically correct and why? I got less time to focus per course. I got less time per course to focus on. Edit: I want to convey the idea that because I took ...
0
votes
3answers
169 views

“To mentor someone during a project” vs. “to mentor someone on a project”

..., whom I mentored during his final semester's project. ..., whom I mentored on his final semester's project. Which of these two is grammatically correct? Since I am not talking about ...
0
votes
1answer
599 views

“With use of” or “with the use of”?

Do you solve engineering problems with use of programming methods, or, Do you solve engineering problems with the use of programming methods ? Which one is true? Or are both of them false? If so, ...
0
votes
1answer
667 views

Starting a sentence with because

Because PaymentX stores the user's credit card details for you and sends your server a token to charge the card, if you use our SDK, your PCI compliance scope is greatly reduced compared to the case ...
1
vote
2answers
64 views

Is it “island of ###” or “island ###”? [duplicate]

Should I write/say "Island of Guernsay", "Island of Madagascar", "Island of Taiwan", etc. or is it OK to write/say "Island Guernsay", "Island Taiwan", etc without "OF" as it is in German and Dutch? ...
1
vote
1answer
1k views

Is it “query on …” or “query about …”

Which is grammatically correct? Query on Physics Final Query about Physics Final Say if this was a subject field in an email you're about to send to a teacher. Which would be better ...
0
votes
2answers
3k views

“Recommendation of” vs. “recommendation for” – what is the difference?

Which of the following sentences is correct? We are glad to provide a recommendation of a good work you did. We are glad to provide a recommendation for a good work you did.
1
vote
2answers
112 views

“I will rob you of it” vs. “I will rob it of you”

Which of these is grammatically correct, and why? I will rob you of it I will rob it of you
1
vote
2answers
1k views

'Opposite to' or 'opposite'?

Which usage of the word opposite is correct? Their house is opposite to the Red Cross Hospital. Their house is opposite the Red Cross Hospital. I cannot seem to find a definite answer on ...
1
vote
1answer
1k views

“Enquire about whether” vs. “enquire whether”

I'm writing to you to enquire whether you have a need for I'm writing to you to enquire about whether you have a need for Which is proper?
0
votes
2answers
110 views

“The first step in making” vs. “the first step on making” vs. “the first step at making”

I have this sentence: I strongly believe that the first step in making the most efficient solution for any problem is analyzing it well. Would it be better to use either of the following? ...
0
votes
1answer
1k views

“You did a good job [at/in] answering my questions”

Which phrase is grammatically correct? good job at answering my questions good job in answering my questions good job answering my questions Or, are all the phrases correct?
3
votes
4answers
341 views

“Lodged a complaint to the Authorities” or “Lodged a complaint with the Authorities”

I have a question regarding the usage of the words to and with in the sentence "He lodged a complaint to/with the Authorities". Which is correct? Note: Lodge in this context is "to present (a ...
1
vote
1answer
75 views

Usage of “odyssey” and “splendid”

I started my odyssey on the splendid world of mathematics when... Is this a right way to use the word "odyssey"? Is "odyssey on sth." correct? Can I use "splendid" to describe the world of ...
0
votes
3answers
452 views

Can “once” and “since” be followed by a V-ing clause?

Consider these examples: Since the board realized that the figures are increasing, they have been searching for a new campaign. Once the board realized that the figures are increasing, they ...
-1
votes
1answer
41 views

“The behavior is seen in other properties” vs. “for other properties”

The same behavior can also be seen [in/for] other properties such as the color and the mass. Which one is correct here, in or for? EDIT: Adding more context: The charge of quarks increases ...
0
votes
0answers
15 views

“An answer to the question” vs. “an answer for the question” [duplicate]

Which is grammatical: She had no answer to the question. She had no answer for the question.
-1
votes
2answers
1k views

“Critical in” vs. “critical for” vs. “critical to” [closed]

I am confused about the correct preposition to use before achieving in this sentence: Tracking service delivery is critical in achieving the goals of the health program. I feel "critical for ...
0
votes
2answers
373 views

Dropping prepositions such as 'to' and 'for'

Do these sentences make sense grammatically, and if so, is this a formal/colloquial/archaic construction? She gave it him. She gave him it. It was provided her by the state. She was provided it by ...
2
votes
3answers
725 views

“Responsible for” vs. “responsible in”

Which sentence is incorrect and which one is correct? Why? She is responsible for answering the phone. She is responsible in answering the phone.
1
vote
1answer
341 views

Sentence patterns: There are 16 ways to “leave” your book

Playing around in my head the different positions that a subject; verb; direct object; and indirect object can be positioned in one sentence, I ended up with 16 sentences using only the simple past ...
1
vote
4answers
421 views

Using the prepositions “on”/“off” as transitive verbs

Is it correct to say 'on it' or 'off it', where 'it' may refer to something like a light switch?
1
vote
1answer
104 views

“Come of a royal family” vs. “comes from a royal family”

Is it correct to say "She comes of a royal family"? Or should it be "She comes from a royal family"? Both sound correct to me. Could someone explain?
0
votes
1answer
133 views

'Per' vs 'by' - as in 'interactions by/per post'

I'm attempting to get a title for a list of interactions made on posts by users. "Interactions by/per post". Are by and per interchangeable? Is one more formal than the other? I feel that by might ...