1
vote
2answers
484 views

Difference between “Can't you” and “Can you not”?

I've been wondering about the difference between questions that use can't you and can you not. Like: Can't you tell just by looking? [I read this from a comic-detective series] Can you not ...
0
votes
2answers
165 views

“Even though none of you have yet to believe it” — grammatical?

Is the following sentence from the TV series American Horror Story correct, formal grammar? We are powerful. Even though none of you have yet to believe it. In my understanding, it would be ...
0
votes
1answer
206 views

Proper use of “nor” [closed]

Which of the following is correct? Is this a proper use of the word nor? Cummings Motors, Smith Electric nor our subcontractors can be held liable. Cummings Motors, Smith Electric and/or our ...
1
vote
2answers
1k views

“Having not” vs “not having”

I did a bit of searching on the difference between "not having" and "having not", but I could not find a convincing argument. I typed this sentence; Congratulations on not having given up yet! ...
4
votes
2answers
313 views

“Not a clue” vs. “no clue”

Example: — What is he called? — I have not a clue. — What is he called? — I have no clue. Are both versions grammatical in English? If they are, which one is preferred by native ...
1
vote
1answer
217 views

“Is you is or is you ain't my baby?” [duplicate]

Is this phrase grammatically correct? Is you is or is you ain't my baby? It's from a Tom and Jerry cartoon: http://vimeo.com/40283242 (at 1:30, 2:00 and 3:00).
-2
votes
1answer
85 views

Usage of 'not different'

Take a look at this sentence. Many apps are not good. Even some of Apple's own apps are not different. I intend to mean some of Apple's own apps are not good. Is this correct?
-1
votes
1answer
332 views

Is the answer to this question “neither” or “either”?

She doesn't think so or you don't think so? Is it grammatically correct to respond with Either. or Neither. to this question? Or does this depend on the meaning intended to be ...
1
vote
1answer
196 views

Why is “not as … as” preferred to “not cheaper than”?

In the rephrasing exercise A is more expensive than B. > A is not _________ B. The only correct answer is supposed to be "A is not as cheap as B". However, a student suggested "A is not cheaper ...
1
vote
1answer
696 views

Is “make no mistake” a mistake?

Is "make no mistake" proper grammar? Isn't "no" being used as a quantifier? Aren't quantified nouns supposed to be plural when the quantity is none? For example, I was taught to say, "one egg" and ...
0
votes
2answers
293 views

Grammaticality of “I have a car, neither does Sara” [closed]

Can we say "I have a red car. Neither does Sara." or must we say "I have a red car but Sara doesn't."? I have read this on a website and they said that the first sentence is incorrect but I don't ...
0
votes
0answers
34 views

Is the expression “It don't” grammatically correct? [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: The grammaticality of “that don’t impress me much” It doesn't. Usually, we say it this way, right? But I have seen some song lyrics using "it don't". (Examples ...
5
votes
1answer
292 views

Double negation “does not any”

I understand that any has negative connotations, as can be seen in the above link, but I need to say that there are no pages in a book. I've come up with the following sentence: That book does not ...
1
vote
1answer
211 views

What is wrong (if anything) with the phrase “it don't mean nothing”? [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: The grammaticality of “that don’t impress me much” “I don’t know nothing” vs “I don’t know anything” I've noticed that sometimes people say "It don't mean nothing". ...
0
votes
2answers
288 views

Can inversion be used without auxiliary verb?

Is the following sentence grammatically correct? I don't like autumn to be honest, neither like I winter that's coming after it. Can inversion be used in this way? Or does it requires auxiliary ...
-3
votes
3answers
269 views

“Why you no…?” or “What that no…?” — are those grammatically correct? [closed]

Why you no come? Why you no talk English? Why you no have a girlfriend? What kind of English are these sentences? Are these types of sentences grammatically correct?
2
votes
2answers
815 views

Question tag for a sentence starting with “few”

Which is correct? Few people knew the way, didn't they? Few people knew the way, did they?
2
votes
2answers
184 views

Negatives with “a” or “any”

Are both these sentences correct? There isn’t a cat in the kitchen. There isn’t any cat in the kitchen.
1
vote
2answers
523 views

“Neither of you understands him as I do” [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: Which is correct, “neither is” or “neither are”? “Neither Michael nor Albert is correct” or “Neither Michael nor Albert are correct”? Neither of you understands him ...
2
votes
1answer
3k views

“I haven't got” vs. “I don't have”

Which is the correct way of saying this in English? I haven't got any money. I don't have any money. If both are correct, which is the difference between them?
2
votes
1answer
951 views

“Is it not raining” vs. “Isn't it raining”? [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: Tag Questions “is he not” Which is correct: Is it not raining today? Isn't it raining today?
3
votes
3answers
1k views

“Never saw” versus “didn't ever see”

Do these sentences have different meanings? I never saw such a thing. I didn't ever see such a thing. I never saw him dancing. I didn't ever see him dancing. My ...
4
votes
1answer
253 views

Is this correct: “…to all avail”?

Many of you have probably heard the phrase "to no avail", as in "I tried to talk them out of it to no avail." (Which means I tried to talk them out of something but failed to do so). However, I was ...
3
votes
2answers
649 views

Is this correct: “Of [something] I have but none”?

This might be a pretty weird question, given that I'm using awkward grammar. Take into account that I'm trying to play with the language. The question is, would the following be correct? Of milk ...
3
votes
1answer
3k views

“Cannot help but think” vs. “cannot but think” vs. “cannot help thinking”

Which of the following are grammatical? I cannot help but think. I cannot but think. I cannot help thinking. I was taught (1) is not correct. Is it true? Or are they all correct? ...
5
votes
3answers
331 views

On the expression “no [noun 1] or any [noun 2]”

I have often seen the following expressions: [ex.] 1. I have no allergies or any medical issues. 2. John serves a chicken with no sauce or any kind of seasoning. I suspect that such a use is ...
4
votes
4answers
814 views

Can “me, too” be used to reply to a negative statement?

A: I can't understand why my parents keep me from buying fast food. B: Me, too. It's delicious. Does B's answer sound natural? In Korea, we usually teach that we should use 'me, neither' in ...
0
votes
4answers
621 views

Which of these sentences use proper grammar?

Unfortunately, there currently is not a way to make it default to a lower resolution. Unfortunately, there is currently not a way to make it default to a lower resolution. Unfortunately, ...
1
vote
2answers
494 views

Does “not that you would know” make sense in English?

Today I was teasing a colleague of mine who keeps forgetting things. I said "You forgot because it's Friday today... Well, not that you would not forget any other day". I am not sure if it was ...
6
votes
6answers
651 views

What's the “opposite” of “any more”?

Consider the following sentence: [This] is not important for the younger generation any more. Now let's suppose that for some reason I am willing or obliged to use the adjective "unimportant" ...
8
votes
1answer
579 views

Is “It won't let me not.” grammatically correct?

I found myself saying the following sentence the other day: I always fasten my seat belt because my car won't let me not — it starts beeping loudly. If I were to use allow instead of let, I ...
5
votes
2answers
3k views

'To' vs 'in order to' in negative clauses

The answers to this related question suggest that to and in order to are pretty much interchangeable, the former being preferred in informal contexts. My question is about negative clauses. ...
2
votes
3answers
5k views

“Neither” and “either” usage in negative sentence

I would like to make sure I understood the usage of these: Do you want A or B? I do not want either. [none of them] I want neither. [Can I say that?]
4
votes
2answers
2k views

“Seems to be not X” vs. “seems to not be X”

Which one of these two sentences is written correctly? This test data seems to be not good. This test data seems to not be good. Better yet if you could explain as to why the correct ...
3
votes
1answer
181 views

Why must “not” frequently be paired with “do”? [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: English questions and negation with do in syntax I've always wondered why English insists on pairing not with do, when negating an action. For example, you say: I ...
5
votes
4answers
2k views

Contraction of “is not”

How exactly can you contract the phrase "is not"? More specifically, what's the difference between the sentences, "The dog isn't running." and "The dog's not running."? They both sound correct to ...
2
votes
1answer
222 views

Double 'not' in questions - how is it correct?

Suppose the following sentence: "Aren't the headers not covered by copyright?" Is this sentence correct?
1
vote
2answers
4k views

“can't see neither A nor B” or “can see neither A nor B” [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: Still confused with “neither…nor…” ...can't see neither A nor B. Is that grammatically correct? Or is this? ...can see neither A nor ...
28
votes
6answers
47k views

What is the correct way to use “neither” and “nor” in a sentence together?

Given these facts: The tool cannot be found in the kitchen. The tool cannot be found in the bathroom. Which is the correct sentence to represent the situation above? I can find the tool ...
16
votes
4answers
23k views

“Can hardly wait” versus “can't hardly wait”

This has been bothering me for a while and I'm finally at a forum where I feel like I might get an answer. I have heard people say "I can hardly wait for summer to get here" and I've also heard "I ...
13
votes
12answers
2k views

The grammaticality of “that don't impress me much”

I'd like to know how the sentence "That don't impress me much" sounds to a native English speaker. The phrase is the title of a song by Shania Twain, and to my eyes it contains a clear error. It is ...
2
votes
3answers
12k views

“Why do not you come here?” vs “Why do you not come here?”

I have two questions. What is the difference between "Why do not you come here?" and "Why do you not come here?"? Are both of "Why do not you come here?" and "Why do you not come here?" ...
5
votes
5answers
2k views

Is this usage of “aren't” proper English?

Aren't you going to go outside? My wife insists this is improper English, Hillbilly speak, she calls it. The proper way to ask, she says, is Are you going to go outside? I say it's the same as ...
9
votes
5answers
3k views

Should “anymore” only be used in a negative statement or question?

I don't know why this is so, but I've always believed that the word anymore should only be used in a question or negative statement. Do you go there anymore? Don't do that anymore. But I often ...
5
votes
5answers
372 views

Is “it is no calculus” correct grammar?

I often hear people saying, it's no big deal, or I am no […], etc. I was wondering if it is acceptable to say it is no calculus in a college essay.
12
votes
4answers
2k views

Should I use 'or' or 'nor'?

This document does not cover the SDK interfaces nor any other reference material. I think the above is correct, but my grammatical checker in Microsoft Word underlines nor and suggests or. Why?
18
votes
4answers
25k views

“Whether or not” vs. “whether”

This will depend on whether he's suitable for the job. This will depend on whether he's suitable for the job or not. This will depend on whether or not he's suitable for the job. ...
5
votes
2answers
463 views

About question tags

He did nothing*. Which is the correct question tag for the sentence above? didn't he? did he? What is the effect of using nothing for negation?